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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 27 · 1 year ago

26. Meghan Chayka, Co-Founder, Stathletes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Meghan has had an entreprenurial spirit for a long time. Having had experience in analytics and seeing a need for more of it in sports, she co-founded Stathletes. Her company now works with 22 hockey leagues around the world, providing data to help them win. Often the only woman in the room, Meghan is a force to be reckoned with. She does not have time for doubters, but she will make time to support other women and mentor young people who could one day follow in her footsteps. In this episode, we talk about how she started her company, what makes a great entrepreneur, why there aren't many women in sports tech, and what legacy she hopes to leave on this industry.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes, here's your host, Amanda Morgous Pey there. If this is your first timetuning in this is a show all about incredible women working in sports.This episode features a True Rock Star. Who knows what she wants and goes afterit. Megansheka grew up in Toronto around sports, mainly hockey, becauseyou know Canada, loved Canada by the Wey, and she always had thisentrepreneurial spirit about her. She was motivated to create something thathadn't been created before and she has a background and analytics, and so shedecided to create a company that focusis on using analytics to helpteams an athlete be better at their jobs. Che Co founded stathletes aboutten years ago now, and they work with twenty two hockey leagues around theworld. She speaks at tech panels, often as the only woman in the room, and shedoes not care what doubtors have to say about her or her business. I'm soexcited to shut this conversation with you. If you have any plans, hat aughtto start a business one day or if you just want to learn what it takes to becompitent and be a leader get ready to take some notes here is my conversationwith Megansheka, hello, Megan. How are you good? How areyou I'm good thanks? I appreciate you taking the time I know you areextremely busy. Hockey is in full force and you have a law going on. So Iappreciate you taking the time or going to jump right into it. I'd like tostart with a rewind. So if you can take us back Megan, where did you grow upand how did you fall in love with sports? I grew up near Toronto, so Imean, I think everyone knows the Tronto Raptors are well Chamtion, still rightnow and obasilly. Every major sport that you coan want so grew up and forSHIROHAP and Ahackey, but also you know, always was involved in sports growingup, I'm really tall. So when people meet me or see me hard, not to see me because I'm oversix foot so as a you know, blond woman- I don't really Blendin, but it wasgreat in squorts I was like six foot as a twelve year old, so I played and dideverything you know. I was a baseball teacher, volleyball growing anything that youcould ask me thats, like traditional tall person thing. I did so alwaysinvolved in like both sides of sports, whether it was business or plain wow. Idon't think we have time to dive into your height, but I'm sure there's a lot.We can talk about with that, especially as a kid you know what I mean like justbeing I I was taught not as tall as you, but I was a tall kid as well, and youknow T it's not that easy growing up...

...tall yeah, I mean you know everything.I've done in my life. I've like tried to use to my advantage and twice as apositive, and I think my parents and my family were very like that too. So Ijust embraced it to be honest, like, and I grew to love sports because of myheigt too yeah. You absolutely should embrace that. So what was your firstjob after college? That's my question. I mean for me even during college. Imean we call it university in Canada, but like Undergrad, I um always Havelikinternships, so I you know spent summers working in like the publicsector. I worked for a major private company right out of college too. Iworked for a Fortue five hundred company, so I had a really good blend o.You know both public private sactor, really big companies, large enterpriseand then also started my own business. So I've pretty much done a lot in termsof having touchpoints in different industries and having a lot ofexperience analytics, and I think you know that help me understand or youknow what need to be changed or like innovation in sports yeah, I'm soexcited to dive into that. I have so many questions. Tell us about yourcompany Stathle to what is your mission, and what do you guys do for yourclients sure? Well, we started actually over ten years ago and en that long YI've been a long time which you know goes fast, but at the same time I mean a lot ofthings to change like before we started our company or during our our companymoneyball. The movie came out so before we were pitching the people, it wasalways like. You know, ditas important and sports and making decisions andhears. Why and then, when that be came out, it was like you know, are youbrownpet or Jona hell and people like that right? What kind of you know ten secondelevator pitch was so m for sure the industry, like shifted to being more,you know into see a science and to be really quantifiable in terms of youknow, getting more information and getting faster, better H, datasid. SoI'd say, like you know, we were, we were pretty lucky to you know, hit onsomething that was going to really change both business and sport. To behonest, so yeah it's been quite a while and definitely got some. You knowfavorable balanceas, to be where we are. That's amazing, for those of US mainlyme who aren't as smart as you in the textpase hat. Is it specifically thatyou do for your client? Someone comes Tou and hires you. What do you helpthem with? So I guess like statlyt's O, you know we first started building likesocar applications like track Dida and bring more like dataproducts andinsights to various levels of clients. So we have clients around the worldthe're anywhere from leagues teams, players, ages, N, media gambling, allsorts of applications. I just want to...

...use sport data in different ways. Weonly work in hockey, so we track in twenty two leagues worldwide andprovide better datasits, more afterate, more an death to understand, knowdifferent parts of the game that traditionally haven't been recorded. Sowhen you watch a hockey game, you know you know a face off, you know hit. Youknow a shonatown to where I was from. We provide all the information aroundthat as well, in addition to a lot more detail on on the players on the teams.So when we have clients, it's Pur, a wide variety of reasons, but mostlythey want to make better decisions, they want to win and they want todivelop their players. So going back to the beginning of when you started, youobviously saw a need for this, and then you thought, okay, I can be the personto do this. What was that thought process like for you? Yeah? I mean, Ithink it's organic and I think for a lot of entmreneurs, especially greatentrreneurs. It's like not necessarily like ouforce ideas on the market, soyou know initially. I thought I maybe Wantd to start a company and startedpractising pitching kind, O like Shark tank or dragon's done for anyone.That's you know listening, so you go. You pitched a pannel. You pitchedtinvestors, you pitchd to forfassors and I actually my first pitch was onlike a baby bottle company. So I really wanted to start like a health companyin that space, and I thought it was a great idea and it was like beforeJessca Albo started a billion dollar like honest company in that space. So Ifelt like I thought, friend, Um but D, I wan quite a few competitionsactually and just didn't- want to go into like the product base, an had alot more industry experience and analytics. So when accamp with thisidea to bring you know more data to hockey, we realized that there wasn't alot of competition. There wasn't very many companies at all. In fact, we werepretty much the first company in the space, so we had to sort of make themarket and have that pitch and one of our first whims was actually inKentucky. We lost a couple of pitches in Toronto, they did they weren'tsurbon our business model or if it was big enough, but in Kentucky they werelike yeah. We understand, you know horse racing horse, gambling and Mthenfl. Both are like majorly, driven by you know having more data. So you know we met people who were veryinterested and invested in what we did and you know we were able to bankrolcompletely with our own revenue. So we didn't have to take on investors. Wedidn't have to do anything that outside forces wanted, we could just focus onournish and what we want to provide in hockey. I mean I already knew that youwere awesome, but like I'm just so impressed because and we'll get intothis too, but especially being a woman in this space. I mean tell me about thedoubters like, especially in the beginning, when you were starting outthere had to be some right. Well, I think there still is doubters right andI think you could agree to an hockey an...

...in sport in general. There's not a tonof really strong women in you know exacutive positions Theye, just notright, for whatever reason, maybe it's a pipeline, Pau Proem, maybe you knowit's a networking thing. No one's really quite sure why that equationdoes not up, but you know I walk into a lot of arenas and people assume youknow, I'm in media or I'm in some of these roles at you see a lot more womeninvolved tin and I think you know, there's greatpeople breaking down mirrors in every single space, but for sure whether it'son hockey operations or executive side very few and far between women. So yeah, it's definitely a challenge. Imean my mindset. I think I have just pushed out to the back, where I think,if Ying Professional, I an value, I will win over good people who want todo great business and those are the people I align myself with. So I don'treally worry about the doubtors I like to hear where they stand, because Idon't want Ta, Pat Time, energy focus into people who don't believe in me orwho don't value my hard work with that sad. I've definitely had meetings evenrecently, where you know I wasn't on the docget and I walked in as a woman,and they were shocked because Ti hadn't seen a woman, and you know two or threedays an executive meenint wow en you know two thousand and nineteen, so that kind of motivates me to keepworking hard. So it's more of the norm. You know I want to see more women withme. I want more women in that room that I walk into. I don't see myself as likethe token woman, which you know I think historically sometimes people feel likethere can only be one woman in the room and we tend to compete against eachother. But that's I line ithoght. I don't personally take or like, and Ithink that you know has created a lot of friction amongst women executivesthat shouldn't be there yeah and I feel like especially now it's less commonfor women to compete against one another. I'm sure that was true at somepoint and and maybe it still is Um in certain spaces, but at least in eveneven in broadcasting. On My side, like the women that I've met specifically inhockey, but in other sports as well, everyone's just got each other's backs,and I think that, like the stigma of competing against each other is dead,maybe I mean I hope it is, but I feel like we're all just like. Oh my goshyou're awesome keep doing that 'cause. There really is room for everyone yeah.I completely agree, and I think we can all work together. Toto make the spacebetter as well right so tha, the more awesome women that get exposure both toeach other and to bigger networks. The more we all win, yeah, absolutely lauer,relidge who's on e SPN. She put a quote out actually just today, you just mademe think of it and she was. She was saying you know, don't even think aboutyourself as a woman in sports, like you're, just a person who works insports and you're good at your job and and that's what it is. You knowfocusing on being a woman almost it just. It makes it more of a thing whenreally like you said, like we still...

...belong in the room, so let's just notfocus on that and just do our jobs totally yeah, and I think you know Iget that question a lot and I think for me my mindset is that I'm PAS thatpersonally and I know- and I you know I'm aware that you know I'm still awoman- I can't change that. So I tend to focus on the control like what I cancontrol in my life and everything else I just leav behind and what's cool is. If you are the onlywoman in the room, then people are paying attention to you and you canhelp griw your business and be like all right. Well, since I have yourattention anyway, here is what I'm doing. I agree it's perfect, so you've been doing this for ten Imean even more years. Obviously, since you know, you've been working hard onthis way before you launched the company, but how would you say you'vegrown personally through all of this? I think definitely, leadership is aprocess. It's it's a long road and I don't feel like I'm a greatleader, butI feel like I work every year to be better and better at that, and you knowwhen you talk about that. I think it's an Eloman of of recruitment too, soalways in staruks, and I feel like in sports as well. You know having awinning culture and finding people who are going to push themselves and push.You is a talent, so I would say: Iway spendhalf my time at my company recruiting great people talking about what I do and you know it's it's seen in thestartup world is marketing, but I really think it is just being walkingthe talk too right. So you can tell people how great you are, but if youdon't execute, no one will believe you. You can tell people how empathetic youare, but if you don't listen to them and really care when they have problemsand try to help them, no one will believe that. So I think it's not onlyyour words that matter. It's your octions and I think that's somethingthat you know takes a long time to develop in terms of you know, workingtowards being a better person and a better c Eo or leader every day. Whatdo you think has been the most surprising part of running your owncompany, probably that it doesn't get easier like you just get better. Youknow, I think, as you grow and they always say like the first millions thehardest- and you know I I think that's true to a certain extent and likegrowth of companies, but I think you know your problems, your timemanagement Um. You know the stakes get a lot higher. The client demands reqlasts get a lothigher, so I think you know. I always thought when I was in college that thatwas like. Oh, you know I'm overloaded in courses and I'm studying for M forfive exams, and I do when I did in college and a Lont in a day now, intert of productivity, so yeah, Itruly believe like enjoy every moment, enjoy every you know, sagment of yourlife, because you know, I think people...

...always hope for there's this big breakand then things come easy and I think you know everything. That's worthwhileis hard work totally easy as a lie ES. He does not exist. What advice would you give to? I wantto say women specifically, who feel that either they don't have what ittakes to start a company or they just kind of need, a push to take their ideato a big stage. Yeah, that's a good one 'cause, I think, for women or anyentrener, or that matter it's about finding a great mix of people. You knowI meet single founders and there's some people that can really do it, buttypically you have two or three people before you launch a company that aresort of the Co founders and have complimentary skellsides. So I wouldsay you kow be realistic about yourself what you're goot out, where you knowyou could use help in whether it's finance operation strategy and reallyalign yourself and and find people that you know you not only like and trust on the business side, but also asfriends, because you know starting a business is in some ways o like family. You know you're you're,really putting a lot of time. Energy in many cases, capit altogether, there's alot of risk that are associated with it. So a lot of things have to line to besuccessful, but I truly believe you know people know and can pick out greatenttreneus, like there's a lot of overlaps in terms of you know the thefabric that runs between people who are successful, so I would say for sure youhave to have great people that you know have your back and are really smart anddedicate as much as you then also a belief in yourself right that you'llmake it happen. That failure is never the end. It's just the beginning of anew idea. Oh, I love that. That's a good one! The the people thing isimportant because if it's your idea- and you are more passionate about itthan the people around- you- that's a problem. You know like you need tosurround yourself with people that are going to lift you up and take you tothat place that you want to go because you can't do it alone and if it's youridea, you know like you're gonna, want it to get to that place, that you'vealways dreamt of absolutely and they always say and startups to you want tolike replace yourself every two years, so I'm always training of like who'sthe next met, and then you move on to bigger more strategy different projectswithin a company. So that's always interesting. So we've talked a lotabout just being a woman in this industry and being a woman entrepreneurbeing a woman in sport INTEC. Overall, though, how would you say diversityintact has changed over the years, I'm hoping in in a positive way. Yeah!That's a tough question, because you know I'm so busy. I don't really get tosee too many other companies. I know Ya. No, there was a big plush for diversity,especially in San Francisco, like the major companies- and you know it's...

...two or three years ago. Definitely, youknow set off alarm belels like it just wasn't what it should be M and I think,with you know the current momentum too there's a lot of like diversity andinclusion that you know we don't only need women, we need. You know black anddisiness people of color to be in leadership, rules and black women aswell right, there's a huge lack of of diversity in terms of that and youdon't want to be the one token woman either in the room- and you know it'sall white men ar all white people talking about a sport, a companywhanever. So I think for sure there's a lot of work to be done, and I think youknow, as white women we do have a lot of privilege. So, like acknowledgingthat that you know I get to be in a room because of like how I was born, Ithink that's important to understand. Um. You know I'm definitely not anexpert on it as as well. I will tell anyone, but you know I try to learn, read alinemyself with people of my money into organizations. I think are doing greatwork in that, and you know I hope that will continually change 'cause for sureI go to all the big tack, ovants I've spoken on Alonthe, whether it's Mi t,websalmed and lesbian. We have a huge collision conference to like a hundredthousand people in Toronto intact and it's largely the same type of lookingpeople talking people and same type of companies. So Um. You know I hopeChangeis coming. I you know feel e re energize as much as is pandamic andCobet has sucked. I. I really hope that there'll be goo change. Out of you knowwhat we'll take from this year. Well and what's encouraging, is you aresomeone who recognizes the need for it? And you are someone in a position ofpower to hire these kinds of people, so you can contribute to the positivegrowth in that way, which is amazing and and I'm sure that you've alreadythought of ways to do that. You brought up the s and the PWORD covet andpandemic, and I almost was like do I go an entire episode, probably for thefirst time ever and not bring it up, but I mean it's: It's impacted us in somany different ways, especially you know. Having your own business, what'sbeen the biggest challenge for you guys. I guess, like we've, been prettyfortunate because data and analytics and even the way we structured ourcompany, we can remotely quite easily and to be honest, we had a few peoplerejo to us that were like epidemeologist and you know, PhDs andand different Hile Studies. U So we worked Ath a group actually in Torontoand we're helping them with like dashboards for Ppe, so we were quitebusy m. You know kind of pivoting, I suppose, and helping on the outside fora bit, which was you know interesting and we didn't know if hockey on hockeywould come back or what hat would look like. So it s it was kind of ainteresting break to like not do so do...

...a project or have a client and sportsfor a bit, and you know we were happy to help outas well and learn something new, but it kept us very busy. So we've beenpretty much busy since the shutdown which no superfortunate M, but yeah I mean it's never fun right. Idon't think anyone likes not attending games or not traveling, and it's hardfor companies too, like working all remotely. Basically, you miss that human contact right, NDand brainstorming and all the great things that come from my companyculture, so it certainly has provided a lot of challenges M and will definitelytake some of, like the you know, Best Practices from this time moving forward.But you know we're hopeful that hopefully t a year um we'll get back toa bit of our normal operations. Well, thank goodness for the Internet right Imean I've seen that you've done a couple of virtual events and you knowjust being able to be on video calls and even a calllike this just becauseof the Internet, like I don't know what we would do if a pen demicat withoutInternet. I know it's happened, tin the past, but I'm saying right, YEU'RERIGHT NOW! I can't imagine it no. I agree. I actually have done likefifteen different Analxibat, so difteen team. I did the first one like thefirst week, thinking: okay, we're going to be off for two weeks en she, a contetalking HKs, no Ed, like the NFLLEAGUE office. You Know Major League baseballtonight we had no horce racing talking about the Kentucky Dorbeans, so we'vedone basically most sports. Now Wow, I mean that's awesome, but I'm sure yourvoice is tired. So I appreciate you doing this for those of us who again,I'm speaking for myself, don't know a thing about like I. I understand thepurpose of analytics in the sense that, like it's helpful, but how do theseanalytics actually help teams, leagues players Et Cetera people that are usingthem to get the most out of that data? I guess from a really high level. It'sjust yeah, like you, said, more information, so more understanding ofthe game. You know, leagues, are looking to get things right tounderstand whether it's like historable trends, referees, there's all sorts ofparts of the game that can be improved through understanding. You know dataand analytics from teams they traditionally, especially if thehighest loil want to win right, so it any competir advantage anything thatthey can figure out. I mean kind of a glaringly obvious example in the NBA islike the three point shot. You know, everyone figured out that the you knowfarther mid range jump shots that were only worth two points. You take onestepback and it's worth three points we'll take that stepback every timethat was you know their kind of major analetical break through that just aneasy. You know, example, but there's all sorts of like French examples atteams. Players, you know, trainers used to try to improve their games and itcould even be like aging curves right.

So you know you don't play the samewhen you're twenty one as when you're thirty one and you have to adopt- andyou have to understand about your game, you know how you can still contribute,so deta can be used in so many various ways and behind the scenes too, whetherit's media or you know, Um fantasy teams there. As so many ways bans caninteract and understand more about their favorie players and follow theseteams that I think you know, it'll only become more prevalent, not less. Whatare some tech trends that you're seeing now that you think will become evenbigger in the coming years? I think in tact it's funny, there's always likedifferent. You know kind of Flang or sayngs about certain applications ortrends. So you always hear about like Ai, artificial intelligence, machine HM.You know algrithms whatever and to me I mean there's a place for, likeyou know, automation, I think it's great woll hopefully have self drivingcars and don't even have to you know, think when we're having a coffee andgoing to work, but you know I still think more waysaway from having a bit of that like human overlay. So I think you know alot of tack is just trying to be smarter, fast ar more efficient help,usleep better help us be more fit Um. You know whatever those hacks are tomake us better. Haver humans, there's all sorts of tack working on it and in sport too, right making betterathletes that understand, load management or understand how to get youknow recover from injuries faster or make their careers longer Um. You know,there's all sorts of sport, science type TYC companies that are coming outand doing really interesting things so yeah. I think, there's a lot to beexcited fo for in the text base, especially Crosse Sports. Just makesure I'm relying on you, don't let them create robots that actually replace us,because we still need to work mi pell, the Ro over wot. That will be like thekicker, but so I can't live I'm saying this, butit's already Kinda of the middle of September this year, there's not even the acorrect describing word to understand and put intowards how we felt this year.However, it's still a year of our lives, none the less. Do you have any goalsthat Youv set for yourself for the remainder of the year, whether it's foryou personally or for the company I mean I I'm always a big Gol setter. SoI have like micro goals and I have one year goals five year goals both for ourcompany and then for me personally, I think when cobed hit, though it sort ofblew some of them apart and I had already had a bit of a checkles goingwhere I was pretty aggressive in the first quarter, so I was coming intoMarch, pretty hot. You know I was thinking, I'm doing great intwhotototravelf the clients. What I felt like I...

...needed to accomplish m you knowespecially professionally, but I think once cove hads, it kind of makes youyou know g go back through, what's really important, you know what mattersto you and U know that's why I kind of talked about like empathy, and you knowthings that people like in leaderships or or like in people, I suppose Um. Sojust really working on you know, realigning like what's important to meand and how to be as healthy and happy as possible, because even for mycompany, I was traveling so much and trying to get so much done that Iwasn't really even like lifting my head up and enjoying anything. You know if Iwas going on a work trip. It was like for two days. I had like five meetingsand I would get back on the plane and I wouldn't work out once and I would justyou know, eat out, because there's no other option and I found myselfdrifting int like these. You know Middle Age, executive type, a habitsthat I never thought I would be. You know I've always been athletic. I'vealways cared about you know doing other things and, having you know, otherhobbies, so definitely Nepandamac has made merealize that to be the best version of Myselffor, my company and for my familyand friends that you know, I have to take an balance approach and make surethat I, you know Sano, sometimes and focus on, what's important and I thinkwhen you hit those like major goals and makes it even more sweet because you dohave people celebrate it with yeah, if there's any positive that comes fromthe paws. U That was caused by the pandemic. It really the common theme.I've heard from a lot of people and myself included as just having time toself reflect and like really kind of like Givean audit of yourself and yourlife and and figure out, what's important. So I'm glad that you areable to realize that as well. This is kind of a deep question, but I thinkyou can handle it. What sort of mark do you want to leaveon this industry? That's a good question. I mean I think for me. Youknow I don't feel like. I need a title I don't feel like. I need to haveaccomplishd something. That's like the first for a woman or this I think mylegacy is who I lead behind me and that's what I's sort of alluding towhen I said I don't, like being you know the only woman in the room or theonly person, an analytics. You know I want to build a a culture and a group of people thatlike to be profressive that have you know, growth mindsets that want to beinomative and try new things and you know really push the industry. So Ithink, like my legacy, will be the people that I've ment oard and I dohave like mentes around the world and major sports, and you know I put a lotof time and effort and care into those relationships and h. You know I I justhope to see like that next generation come up with the same vigor that I havewell. Thank you for doing that, because being a mentor is extremely important.What you know, otherwise you wouldn't do that, but to have someone to look upto and say, Oh, I can be her one day is...

...extremely important, especially for thethe younger generation. So thank you for doing that. Can you leave us? Thisis the last question. Can you leave us with a woman in sports who inspires you?Wow T, that's a good question. You know 'cause, like I mean, there's a ton ofwomen that inspire me in so many different ways. You can pick more thanone I'll. Let you have more than one it's hard. It is hard 'cause honestlyfor me. I I feel a little bit alone. I won't lie as like a woman, a sportentreneur. Let's say: There's not a ton of people, I feel like Angela or GeroldUm. You know she's one a I look up too SAR the sports innovation lab. You know.I really think she could be an executive and hockey if, when sheeverwants to M Alison Lucan, who I work with actually on the hockey analyticsnight and Canada events is just an awesome person. Great Journalist, I'velearned so much in communications and in blending like Dita and story tellingso she'd be another one in like my very close space, but going back to the mensorship thing,a lot of the mentors I I've had have actually been men and that sort of whyI one to change in terms of like having more mentis at our women under me. So Ithink I do have like a very good vlend of like men and women who I go to fordifferent reasons and who inspire me, and you know, even on my Avet, I we had.You know a woman from I believe she was new ork Yankees. That was one of thefirst women in uniform on the field this year, so that was super inspiringfor me as well, like obviously the NBAS having their firstwomen's commentatorin like the championship. I think that's like awesome as well, so I liketo get these likes first out of the way, because I really don't think that theyshould exist anymore, and you know we should just have a lot more women. So Iguess that's a long one to Danswer to say there's so many people that I drawinspiration from, and I don't think you know being a celebrity or having a bigjob necessarily inspires me. I I, like you, don't take a lot of energy frompeople. In my day to day people I work with m one of our like best managers.She played woman's hockey, her name's Ambrellas and she is you know, anexceptional um person to work with and were so lucky to have her so yeah. Ithink to me inspiration is, you know, working hard every day, getting bettertrying new things. It's not necessarily people that are, you know, quoteunquote. Celebrities. That's a great answer, though, because it's it'sinspiring that someone can be inspired by so many different people, becausesometimes a lot of people are very narrow minded and they think. Well, Idon't see myself reflected in this position that I want. Therefore I can'tget it so I'm just going to go do...

...something else, so I think you beingable to see other people doing amazing things and that inspiring you to doyour own thing is awesome and I'm I'm actually glad that you brought up themen M who've bent toward you, because I feel like sometimes what gets lost intalking about women in sports is I never want people to think like like.Do they just like hate the men in sports, then no n N. No, absolutely not!I'm the same. I've had so many amazing men that I've worked with in the sportsindustry that I still call friends to this Tay and and the men that supportwomen in sports are so important not only to US individually, but just ingeneral, like just being respectful of of every human being. Um is a reallyimportant trait to have so I'm glad that you brought up that you had M, hadand have men who are mentors to you totally yeah completely agree. Well,Megan. I know that there's hockey on tonight- and I think every night untilthe Stanley Cup is hoisted, so thank you so much for taking the time. Ireally appreciate it. You're doing so many awesome things and there is a lotthat we didn't get to, but keep being amazing. Please stay in touch and goodluck with the rest of the year. Thank you. I really appreciate it. You know as cheesy as it might soundhearing Megan talk about getting inspired by good energy around her andhow seeing others get inspired actually inspires. Her is such a cool way to seethe world seriously. I mean, if you waited around for someone that lookslike you. Talks like you, has a vision like you to inspire you to do that onething or be that one person you would wait forever, because no one will everbe you. No one has ever been you again. I know that all sounds really cheesy,but just looking around and soaking in inspiration from others, inspiration issuch a fantastic way to live, and I'm so excited to start implementing thatin my own life. I hope you love this episode. If you did- and you happen tobe listening on Itunes, please rate and review to help others find the show,and if you want to follow Meggon on her journey, you can do that at Meganshekaon instregamant twitter as Megan with an h and her last name is Cha Yka andyou can find me, and so she goes pot as always. Thanks for listening.

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