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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 24 · 2 years ago

23. Kaitlyn Vincie, NASCAR Host and Reporter, Fox Sports

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Falling in love with NASCAR happened overnight for Kaitlyn Vincie. Well actually, all it took was one race and she was hooked. She wroted about the sport for her college newspaper, took internships, posted YouTube videos, doing everything she could to set herself up for a big job at Fox Sports, covering the sport she loves. Kaitlyn is now a mom of a 3-year-old, and currently carrying her second child. She thanks NASCAR for not only providing her an amazing career, but for also building her family. Yep, she met her husband through the sport, too. Kaitlyn is a pioneer for women everywhere, proving it is possible to create a life you love, covering a sport that not everyone is exposed to. And if you ask her to convince you to become a NASCAR fan, she will. Easily.

Conversations with real women who make sports happen. This is and so she goes. Here's your host, Amanda Borgeous. Hello, welcome in. If you are a first time listener, this show highlights amazing women doing awesome things in the sports world. My guest this week is someone who is paving the way for females in the motor sports industry. And really, if you asked her, she has names of women who paved the way for her. But truly, Caitlin Vincy is an expert when it comes to NASCAR and racing. She's been covering the sport for nearly a decade and currently hosts race hub for Fox sports and a few other shows for the network. CAITLYN talks about how she fell in love with the unique sport, why she's so passionate about it and how covering the sport has shaped her family life. Literally. She met her husband through Nascar and they now have an almost three year old and a baby on the way. We of course, talk about her pregnancy journey on TV and what she's learned being a working mom. CAITLIN also tries to convince us why we should become NASCAR fans. If we aren't already, let me tell you, she is pretty convincing. Here is my chat with NASCAR hosts and reporter for Fox sports, wife and mom, Caitlyn Vincy. Hey Caitlyn, how are you? I'm doing great. How are you? I am great. Thank you. Thank you for joining me. I'm super excited to talk to you today. There is so much going on. How I usually like to start is I like to start with a little rewind. So first just take me back. How did you first come to fall in love with sports? Yeah, you know, I really was interested in sports at the high school level. That was kind of when I was involved in track and field and cross country as an athlete myself. So I had started racing competitively when I was actually in middle school. So I think just that exposure to sports and being around it, being a teammate with other individuals you piques your interest right early on in athletics and that competitive nature. So even when I was in high school, I was on our school paper and I started focusing on the sports related articles. And when I went off to college I already kind of knew that communication studies was going to be my major that I wanted to focus on, and I went to a NASCAR race while I was in college and I fell in love with the sport of NASCAR and I didn't have any pre exposure to it. My parents weren't fans, my dad wasn't a driver or former crew chief. I really knew nothing about the actual sport. All I knew was that the sporting events were fun and that when we had garage access at the races, which is, you know, say equivalent to a sideline pass at an NFL game or something, it was very intriguing to me. So from that point forward I decided okay, Nascar, that's the path I'm going to take in sports journalism and I'm going to do everything in my power to try and and make it as a journalist and NASCAR. I love that because, just like you said, it's such a specific sport that unless, like you said, a family member gets you into it or something like it's so funny that all it took was one NASCAR event to really get you hooked. Yeah, it's it was just so unique. And My dad, I will say he's a big car guy. He's kind of a car collector, but I wouldn't he didn't sit down and watch NASCAR races when we were growing up, but I had kind of looked around and the garage area and I took in the whole community that is the sport of NASCAR, and everybody had their specific job, all the mechanics had a purpose around this one car ...

...with forty two other cars in the garage area and I was really fascinated by it and I thought to myself, okay, I know nothing about this. If I can learn this sport and succeed in the sport, I will really feel like I have achieved something, because it's actually a very difficult sport to learn because if you didn't grow up working on cars and things like that, the mechanic side of this board is very challenging, I would say, to learn for a journalist. So you have your work cut out for you. And so at that point forward, I just dedicated the rest of my college experience, and really obviously it's been my life has been dedicated to to learning racing and and being the best I can be as a journalist and in motorsports. It's funny that you say that, because it's true, like I've covered multiple sports, but I know nothing about NASCAR, like nothing about it. Because, like you said, if you're not around it. I mean obviously you can watch a race on TV and, like you, understand the point, but there's so much more to it. There's so much more to it because you know, unlike other sports, every racetrack is different. You know in the NFL you that you have the same field and the NBA you have the same court, but in racing every track is different. You could go to a short track, a superspeedway, a mile and a half. The setups that the team's bring within the car is different every week. The tire the good year supplies to the team's is different at every race. So there's just a lot of different variables, is my point, that you have to keep up with and you factor into obviously you're dealing with machines, so there's so many parts and pieces that go into the race cars themselves that make it. I think it's very challenging to cover NASCAR. You know, maybe I'm biased. I have done some other forms of motor sports for Fox sports with the Moto series and supercross motor racing, but that's cars. Tough, it really is, but we got to get you to a race. If you've lived someone we need to get you to come to one. Looks Funny. I'm from Florida and so obviously about you know, there's plenty there. I just, like you said, like all it takes, I'm Shure, is just one event, just like a lot of people get into sports because they cover. They go to one high school football game, they go to one track and field event and they're like wow, this is awesome. So what was your first job out of college? Well, first I'll say while I was in college I did three internships in school because I kind of had an understanding even at that point that a degree I didn't feel was going to be enough to find a job out of school. I felt like I needed to get some experience while still in school, and I whenever people ask me for advice, I always encourage college students to really make the most of their college experience and to utilize internships because it's a great springboard to make connections and create a resume, even as an intern level. You know, obviously most times you're not paid, you're an unpaid intern, but that experience is very valuable once you graduate because it sort of gives you a leg up on people who maybe just got the degree. So while I was in school I did an internship at a local news station. I also work for my Athletic Communications Department at Christopher Newport University, which is where I went to school, and so you were very involved with the school athletics and a variety of roles. And I also intern for a summer in Charlotte, North Carolina, which is where I live now, with a much smaller level of racing which at the time it was called the USA are Pro Cup series, and it's just one of the feeder series that leads you eventually to Nascar, and I traveled with them for a summer as a PR intern, which was really my first taste of traveling with a racing circuit and of course I fell in love with it, even more so at being exposed to the different tracks at that level. So doing those things, I also coupled that with writing a NASCAR column for our school paper because we didn't have anyone writing about NASCAR. I guess no one...

...else cared about it. I don't know what. So I did it and once I graduated there happened to be a craigslist ad posted for a position at Langley speedway, which is a small racetrack in Hampton Virginia, which is still there, and I, you know, applied for it, audition for it. I got the job, but I think, you know, because I had these other things that I had done, it sort of helped me get that job. And so I worked at Langley speedway for several seasons, building as much as I could for my demo real because it was on camera work. It was very little budget on I got a hundred dollars a week now, so I was waitressing and doing a bunch of odd jobs, obviously to make ends meet, but I just kept staying fixated on the the ultimate prize that I felt like it would pay off, of course at some point. And while I was working at Langley speedway, I also set up a green screen and a lighting kid in my spare room of my house, Sparrow, of my town home, and I started filming Nascar reports out of my house for Youtube because I felt like I still, even though I had the Langley speedway Gig, I wanted more experience talking about Nascar on camera. So this was the only way I knew how to do it and I thought it would at least give me the experience and I could post it on youtube and maybe someone would see it and they would like it. And sure enough that's what happened. NASCAR illustrate it, saw it and they started using it on their website, which at the time was a big, big deal because then my work was next to people who were very reputable journalists in the sport so that was huge and that, all those things helped me build my demo reel that I eventually sent to Fox sports. I would update it periodically and kept sending it to a connection that I had made at Fox who is still my boss to this day. Oh and they eventually hired me. But yeah, that was my first, first kind of job out of school. So a lot of us that get into the business grow up and we see someone, we see someone on the sidelines of a football game, we see someone in a studio and we think I want to be her, I want to be him. Did you have someone like that to look to for inspiration for what you wanted to dedicate your career too? I did, and it's funny because I've worked with those people now that I looked up to, because Christ to Voda, who is now a host for NBC sports network, for Nascar and Jamie little and Shannon spake. We're all in my senior dissertation as examples of women who had obviously held their own and a maldominated workplace. So when I did my senior dissertation in College, I did it on kind of the gender disparity. They can work, you know, play into too various workplaces. So I focused on, of course, NASCAR and I use those three women as examples. I remember in my research and they were, you know, they were the role models to me, people I really looked up to. It. Now I've had the opportunity to work with all three of them. Two of them I still work with, which is so ironic but so cool. It is cool and I've been fortunate that there were some really strong women who came before I did that sort of paved the way and set the groundwork and have been good mentors to me and people that were great examples for a college student to look up to. So yes, I did look up to be bull and and now I can actually call some of them my friends. That's amazing. It's cool how that can come full circle because I'm sure at the time when you looked up to them, you just idolized them and thought what they did was so amazing, and now you're one of them. I mean that's just wild. It is being a woman covering racing. It's it's pretty unique. As you mentioned, there are only a few. What sort of experiences have you had that I sort of reminded you like, okay, I...

...am a woman covering the sport. So I think the most like thing that comes to mind for that is, you know, I've spent seven or eight years as an attrack reporter. I'm in the studio now, but I was at track doing garage and pit reporting, and every weekend, you know, the garage opens at a set time, right, so everybody hangs out at the garage entrance until it opens. Will you like stand there and you're looking around, it's just a sea of men and there's very few women, especially women. They get there on the garage opens, because the garage just the hours are pretty strenuous. A lot of times it's seven am or so that it opens. So you look around and it does put it into perspective for a moment that you're one of very, very few. And but I'm at a point now where I don't even notice anymore because I've literally been with Fox for nine years and I've been covering racing for over a decade. So being around a large group of men is kind of the norm for me all the shows that I do. I never am on a show with another woman anymore. It's always me and the guys, and I mean that's just part of it, right. I think you see that in most sports, but particularly you definitely see it in Nascar. So it's just it's become just what I it's all I know at this point. Why do you think there aren't many women covering the sport at a high level? I think it's because some of those reasons we talked about. You know, I don't think a lot of little girls are working on cars with dad, you know what I mean, or with mom for that matter. I think it starts at a very young age. I think the interest in cars is primarily a masculine thing. So they'll probably a lot of the actual fan base. They say it's split relatively even, but I can only say from my own experience. I just didn't have an exposure to it from a young age. So because of those reasons, I don't think it necessarily resonates maybe with women like some of the other sports do, because you know people have football games on or basketball games and those you know women can play basketball and they can do some of those sports. You don't see as many women competing in racing in general. You just don't. Don't fully know why that might be. I think it's getting better than it was. There was a period of time where women weren't even allowed in the garage area, if you can believe that. So we've come a long way and I am seeing more and more working women in the sport, which is a great thing. I've seen definitely an uptick, probably, excuse me, within the last five years. So you know that's actually one of my roles at Fox sports. I host a segment called women and wheels and I posted it for seven years now. It's a subsegment of race up. Are Daily Broadcast, daily NASCAR broadcast, and the whole purpose of it is to showcase the women who work in Nascar that are doing extraordinary things. So we've had some really talented women that we have featured on their women who run the PR division of major manufacturers, women who are toppr representatives for some of the biggest names in the sport, females who are now engineers and sit on top of the pit box that are poised to become crew chiefs one day. So that's been kind of one of my purposes and missions as a journalist is to shed more light on the females in the garage area and to hopefully encourage more to come into it. I love that because if you, even if you watch NASCAR on a daily basis, if you're a huge fan, you might not know that there are women in these positions that are part of the sport. So you getting to highlight them is really amazing and, as you said, I'm sure it's extremely fulfilling for you. Do you have a story of a woman that's either part of the pit crew or or some one that you've talked to you that is really inspired you? Sorry to put you on the spot. Oh No, it doesn't. Every single woman we featured on...

...women and wheels inspired me in different ways because their stories are all so different. But I have to say some of the female engineers, because that is a job I truly can say I would not be able to do. Their brains just start different skill set than mine and I think that would be really challenging because that's a position that's truly entrenched in the sport, because you're a part of the road crew that travels every week, you're one of the engineering staff. You need to know the simulation, you need to know the setups, you need to know how to work with the crew chiefs, with the card chief, with there's just a lot of layers, I feel like, to that job and that's one where you still don't see a ton of females. It's one of the ones where there's just a handful that are doing that, so they're kind of on a island, a little bit by themselves. So those, I think, have been the most that have stood with me quite a bit because I just can't even fathom being able to do that job, quite honestly. But the day we do see a female cross that threshold and become a crew chief in the Nascar at the Cup level, I think will be pretty incredible and you better get the first interview with her when that happens, right, I know, I agree. Will see will be fakers crossed. For those of us who don't know much about NASCAR, convinced us to become a fan. What makes it such an exciting sport to cover. Well, you have to attend a race to truly get the entire feel of what NASCAR is. In my opinion, there's a whole experience that kind of leads up to it. Now, granted, I'm speaking pre covid terms here, because the tailgating and the camping and the environment of our fans is nothing there's just nothing like acause I've been to every sporting a type of sporting event under the sun and I swear race fans are a very unique breed. And there's certain race tracks they're really highlight this perhaps a little more than others, the superspeedways, Daytona, which, as a Florida native, you probably of course, I've heard of. Daytona National Speedway, that our Talladega superspeedway. Those are race tracks that have big like camping areas, big in feels. It's a whole experience just outside of the track before the race even begins, and then once you're in there you can really feel the sensation of speed and and, I for lack of a better word, danger of what goes into this sport. It's truly incredible and I think too, if you have an opportunity to get a hot pass, which is what I mentioned that I had from from one of my initial race experiences. Then you can really see firsthand what goes into the preparation of the cars. You can see the pit crew was doing their work up close. There's really many, many subsets of NASCAR, because there's the drivers themselves, who are they're just truly unbelievable what they do and get the average Joe would say they just sit there and make left hand turns, but it's so much more, my God, it's so much more than that, because you envision yourself driving, let's say two hundred plus miles an hour around forty other people, bumper a bumper, and not wrecking for five hundred miles, that's a skill. I don't care who you are. That is incredibly hard to do. It takes a tremendous amount of discipline and precision and there's many things that go into it, especially on a superspeedway, of the way the drivers manipulate the aerodynamics on the car that helps them propel another track. There's just a lot of layers. So maybe I'm not doing a great job of convincing you. I don't know. No, you're convincing us that there is more to the sport than just watching cars go around and around and around and around. So you have the driver element, then you have the pit crew, which is a huge part of it, because the pit crew can make or break a race, quite frankly, and they are athletes all on their own right. Most teams nowadays recruit former collegiate athletes,...

...whether they were football players, a big group of football players, but there's a wide range of different athletes that they will bring in and recruit to be part of the pickers, which is actually really neat. Many people don't know that. I had no idea, but it makes so much sense. Yes, so those guys fast. Pit Stops can be twelve seconds and that's to change for tires and do additional adjustments that they may want made to the car. And if you just think about that for a minute, changing four tires in twelve seconds or more is what is unbelievable. So that part is a spectacle in itself, watching the pit crew, and of course everything that goes into creating the fast cars is all in the mechanics shoulders, the engineers and the crew chief. So there's really kind of three parts to racing. Some of it is obviously not as tangible because you're not seeing it the preparation that went into it, but you can at least appreciate it. When you see certain cars that are just lights out fast, you know obviously what went into creating that car. So it really is a fascinating sport. You have to experience it firsthand. Sometimes even TV can't fully do it justice because you're not getting the full experience if you're not there. Yeah, well, hopefully post covid some of us and experience our first NASCAR race. You mentioned the drivers. Do you have a favorite driver to interview? Well, technically we're not a lot of favorite, but I would say there's one in particular who people who know me know that he is kind of my closet favorite, I guess, but he's a lot of people's favorites and he's a seven time champion, Jimmy Johnson, because he is such a class act. Whether he's had a good race, bad race or somewhere in between, he's always gracious, he's always kind to the media. He's a good person off the racetrack. He's a family man. He's also in his final season he's retiring after this year, which is heartbreaking for me. I will be sad to see him go, but just a tremendous talent. The things that he was able to accomplish in his career I don't believe will ever be duplicated. Winning seven titles in the Cup series is incredibly hard to do and he won five in a row of his seven. So Jimmy is a class act. Whenever I hear I have to interview him, totally okay with it. You're excited about it. That's great. I know you're not supposed to have favorites, but everyone you know, you know who's like you said, who's Nice and who will answer your questions and and that's okay. So let's get personal for a minute. You're working hard and the industry, you're focusing on your career. Then you meet your husband. How did you guys meet? We met through NASCAR. Wow, my husband's a car chief. He's a car chief for Martin Tricks Jr. So we met through work. Obviously, being out on the road, you travel on the road to the same people for thirty eight weeks of the year, which is a longest running professional sports season. So it makes sense that you gravitate towards people that understand your little world of the traveling circus, as we fondly refer to it. But so I met him in New Hampshire, my God years ago now. But yes, when I say Nascar is my life, it really has brought me the greatest things in my life because it has brought me my career, my husband, my child, I have another child on the way. So all the things that have been important to me, not all the things, but some of the big, big things, came through racing. And it's neat for me because my husband and I share the passion for for the sport, and it's not all we talked about, of course, but I think in a profession like this it...

...really helps to have a partner, in a spouse, who understands it and you almost kind of go through the highs and lows together. You know, because, for example, he won the championship, which is like winning the Super Bowl Nascar in two thousand and seventeen, and the year later they lost a sponsor and the team had to fold, which is absolutely unheard of. Its kind of a strange story, but you know, I of course had to cover when he won the championship, because that's a huge deal. And of course you cover it when the the hard times hit on teams and, you know, loss of a sponsor, what have you. So we go through it literally together because we have to write for our careers. So I don't think anyone understands it any better than me what he deals with and vice versa. So that makes it really helpful because it's a very demanding career, it's a very demanding sport. So if you're both on the same page, I think that just makes it a little easier. It absolutely does. And then once you add your beautiful daughter into the mix or, you know, traveling pregnant and then with her. Yeah, tell me about your pregnancy journey while being on TV. I love talking to people about this because I feel like everyone has different stories. What was that like for you? It was interesting. I was nervous about it, honestly, because you just don't know how you're going to feel. You don't know how much weight you're gonna gain, you know. Yeah, certain things that right, wrong or indifferent, they cross your mind when you're on air for a living, when you're on camera. So of course, and and ours was an accident, which made it even scarier for me because I was like, Holy Shit, I'm not even ready for this, like I don't know what I'm doing. They well, no one knows what they're doing, even if it's not an accident. Through good point, but but I was pretty apprehensive. So it was a lot and at the time I was still traveling every week as a pit reporter. So the other interesting thing is you can't wear your equipment at a certain point, once you're about seven and a half. Well, for me I didn't show till much, much later, which was fortunate, but around seven months, there are seven a half months I couldn't even wear, you know, the equipment that goes around your waist that's required with all the mics and everything. So they had to switch to a backpack version, which, fortunately, Jamie little, who I mentioned at the beginning of the show, had been through this already years ago, so they kind of learned from her experience and they had come up with the idea of a book bag when she was during her pregnancy. So she sends me her old book bag. It was an Oakley book bag and it was just funny because it was like almost like it was being passed down to the next bit reporter who was going to have to fall job. You know, while very, very pregnant, because I traveled up until eight months to my doctors told me I couldn't. So you and it was a dead heat of the summer. Oh my God, we go to some places in the summer to or it's just excruciatingly hot tips. So it was not easy, but it actually I had a very, very easy pregnancy besides all that, because I was very active. I was super busy, you know, I was just going with the flows, doing my thing, so I stayed really healthy and I didn't gain a ton of weight and it was so ended up being fine. But it's definitely you adapt. And now I'm going through it again and three and a half months pregnant now, but I'm a studio, a host, so it's a lot more simplified. You're in a climate controlled environment. You know, you're not having to be in the elements of racing. So it's definitely a totally different experience this time around. But you know, it has his share of challenges because I have felt a lot more sick this time. I had had bad, bad morning sickness. So I actually had to get a prescription to help me with that because I was like me, and I can't even. I don't want to have to think about this when you're talking on national TV, like I...

...might go off set and throw up, you know, oh my gosh. Yeah, it's interesting. It's definitely a unique profession to have while you're pregnant. It is. And it's interesting too, because it's such a personal thing. But when you have such a public facing role where you share your personal life with your fans, it's I'm sure you reached a moment where you're like, okay, do I share this with the world? Do I not? People are going to know at some point. Like how do you navigate it? And there's no right or wrong way to do it. You know, like this is your family, it's it's your personal life, but at the same time you know you have a public facing job. Yes, it definitely has a tricky balance, because the other thing about pregnancy, and I thought be able to hide this. I mean this is gonna be right there there. She's, you know, eating a lot of sweets or she's pregnant, right. But so it's definitely a little bit tricky. Like I said, at this time has been a totally different experience. We've already announced it, we put out into the world and people are obviously very happy and my work was very happy. It was never a problem like that with either child, so it's just one of those things you kind of figure it out along the way. Honestly. Yeah, definitely will. Congratulations on your second by the way, that's very exciting and it's funny you say that too, because it's like, yeah, you've been through it before, but already you're experiencing that this is a completely different pregnancy, so you have to like start over almost, and being pregnant with a child is something new as well. Yes, to that end, what have you learned about yourself as a working mom? Oh Man, that's a great question. What have I learned about myself? Well, I've learned that, you know, you really can do it all and that maybe that sounds like a terrible cliche, but when I got pregnant I was very concerned that something was going to suffer, either the home life of the child or the career. But you can do both, and you can do both to the best of your abilities. It just takes finding your new routine and it can take a little while to get into that rhythm. But I think I have become a better broadcaster since I've been a mother, and the reason I say that is because you're much more centered, you're more focused, you're less selfish of a person because you now have so much more responsibility outside of just you and and I think that's a really positive thing and it's just made me all around better as a person, as a professional and broadcast and as a mom. I mean, I still have my moments telling me wrong or it's just like overwhelmed. Patience is out of all time hot, like low and you're just over it. Well, and she's at that Prime Age right where she'll say things, she'll do things. Yes, she's turning three. We're actually celebrating her birthday after I finish this call with you, because her birthday is on Sunday, but my husband will be out of town at a race. Shocking, so we're doing a little bit early to accommodate everyone's work schedules. But yeah, so she's turning three, which is an age where they are wide open, crazy into everything. It's a fun age, but they're a little more defiant, so you know they'll talk back to you a little bit and that kind of thing. But it's just having kids put so much into perspective and it really makes you real reevaluate yourself and your priorities, and I think for me, getting pregnant was the best thing that could have happened to me. In all honesty, that's amazing. Well, it's funny that you mentioned reevaluating and realizing your priorities, because ever since covid hit, I feel like we've all kind of had to take a step back and really, you know, just kind of be thankful for what we have and try and stay healthy and still work from home. So how has your work space set up been at home, kind of creating this home studio for Fox broadcasts and scheduling things with your daughter's naptime? What is that all...

...been like for you? It's funny you mentioned that, because we actually were in the midst of selling our home and we're building our quote Unquote Dream Home, wow right now, and we started this though right kind of, you know, maybe three weeks before this whole covid thing became a big, big problem. So we were, we are in temporary housing right now, which, as you can imagine, is very interesting because we sold our house, which had plenty of space and you know, my child had her domain and we had our domains. But we had we had said ourselves this temporary six months will do the just a small three bedroom apartment until we get into the other home. Well, now everything has slowed down, the build process has slowed everything is going behind. So we we've had our work out out for us a little bit in that regard because, you know, we didn't anticipate having a toddler and a quarantine in a apartment while our home is finished being built. So it's been a little tricky. But you know, obviously we're very, very fortunate because things could be much, much, much, much worse. But we immediately we moved into place, we had to get the home studio set up because at this point now fox and suspended doing shows from the studio. So it's like a mad scramble to get that situated, make sure that it looks right and all that. So we adapted just like everyone else. I think we're very fortunate as media professionals that that is a business that has been able to adapt so well to these circumstances while we did the home shows and then we did get clearance to return to the studio. That happened a while ago. So we have been operating out of our Fox headquarters in Charlotte to do our shows, but we only have one host now, where we used to have, you know, cohost and a bigger group of analysts. It's a much more smaller team or barebones crew. It's a totally different feel when you walk into the building. They operate in pods, so they're in rotations. They're very smart. They've taken it really serious and it's important that they have, because we need to. But we're fortunate, though, that we have still been able to continue working through this entire process. There was only a two week period that we didn't work. Oh that's it. Yeah, yeah, that's wow, that's amazing. Yeah, it has been really interesting to see how networks and the leagues have adapted, because there have been a lot of safety precautions that have come up and guidelines that we have to adhere to. In your opinion, how is Nascar handled all of these new guidelines so far, especially compared to other sports set have played in a bubble format? NASCAR was one of the first to test the waters and they've been very diligent about their process and we have had some cases of covid with our drivers. Two cases now, which I would say is pretty good given the circumstances and the amount of travel and racing that we've been doing. We've been going since May and we've been going all over the country still, so I think they've done a very good job. I was really proud of the NASCAR leadership and the way they handled everything and they've made a lot of changes to our sport for the better. Different things that they were forced into doing, but is actually improve the racing product, and I'll give you some examples of that being we've taken away practice. It used to be when you would head out to the race market you would have probably two practice sessions for each series to get acclimated to the track. This and that the team's feel out what they have. They did away with practice because they're trying to minimize the amount of days that they're on the road. Right. So now you unload the cars and you race them. I mean it's cold Turkey, no qualifying laps, no practice time. Wow, but it really helps you know see the best teams will rise to the occasion. It's made it really interesting because you know initially some teams would totally miss it, teams that you would expect that they wouldn't. So it just made it a little more compelling because...

...that just adds a whole other element of surprise to it. So they did away with that and they've been really diligent, as I said, about making sure that the teams are safe and the guys haven't been staying overnight very often, only in certain circumstance dances that they had to stay overnight at a race market. So that's been a huge blessing, I think, for a lot of us who have spouses that are on the road. We get to see them so much more right because of this, which I have been loving that part of it. So it's been different. They've had to think outside the box. They had so many races that they had to make up from that two month period that we couldn't compete because we had barely gotten our season started. I think we'd only had three or four races when this hit. So they had a lot of races to make up. So because of that, they placed them at different venues, they shortened the race lengths, they did double headers back to back for the first time and it was awesome. It's been I think it's shown them what they can do moving forward to make the changes for permanent changes in the future. So that part I don't envy the position Nascar has been envy as I'm sure when this season wraps up they are going to be like wow, I can't believe we went through that, because it's been a moving target for them for four months now. But, as I said, I have to commend the leadership. Given the circumstances, they've done a fantastic job and I felt like NASCAR kind of set the bar and they led the way and that was something really unique and we we probably were able to capitalize on that with new eyes on our sport and at one point Nascar was like the only sport that was going. And so the ratings were good and people were tuning in and people are interested and that's a great thing. You know, that's a positive that came out all the craziness. New Fans, new fans, Hey, we'll take them. What sort of projects do you have coming up that you're excited about? Can you give us a little preview. So we are getting close to the playoffs for the Cup series. We only have three races remaining, three race weekends remaining, before the playoffs, which this is the most exciting time of the year right because this is when you make a run for a championship. So we're just continuing with our racehub shows, our daily shows, and I think these are the most fun ones because the storylines are very unique and people are getting knocked out because it's a round system, just like you have another sports where drivers and teams are trying to make it through the various rounds of the playoffs. So this is the best time of the year because we're getting close to crowning a champion, and it's like that for all three NASCAR touring series. So we are continuing also with the Nascar Gander truck series. I host the pre ratio for that. They only have four races to go before their playoffs. So those are the things that excite us the most as we continue on here through November when our season concludes. How many toy trucks and cars does your daughter currently have? She's going to add to her collups in here and just a bit actually because I did buy her another one. I thought her ASCAR Barbie that's wearing like a pit crew outfit. But I I'll cute up her a car with tools to work on, because I'm Mike. We're gender neutral in this household. Yet not one or the other, you know, so love it. got a little bit of both. So we talked about this a little bit before, Caitlyn, but I like to ask all of my guests to leave us with a woman in sports who inspires you. And I know that you've already mentioned a few women, but if there are any that you left out that you'd want to mention, please do so. Woman in sports and inspires me. You know, I'm a big fan of Charissa Thompson and I know she is under the Fox sports umbrella, but I think she's a fantastic host and I love her persona on there and she's on the pregame show for the NFL, which is one of the most watched programs in general, and I think she holds her own so well with with very, very talented analysts,...

...former football players and everything that she's up against kind of on that desk. She really commands it. She holds her own. I've been able to establish a bit of a relationship with her, obviously both of us working at Fox, and she's just a cool check. I really admire her as a person and as the job that she does, because I think that would be a hard job to do, honestly, and she never misses a beach. She's on it. So I would say she is a person that definitely inspires me in a variety of ways. I agree with you. She is very witty and you could tell that, like she won't take any crap from anyone, which is it's awesome. Well, thank you so much for your time, Caitlyn. I really appreciate it. This has been so much fun. I wish you the best of luck with your homebuild and congrats again on your new baby on the way, and I'm so excited to watch you in this very exciting time for Nascar. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate is great conversation and definitely if you ever need anything, just let me know. I have to say I've followed Caitlyn on social media for a while now and of course seen her posting about being at the track and being around the drivers and although I knew next to nothing about NASCAR before this interview. The way she describes the sport, it makes it sound so exciting and Intri kid and I don't know, I might just watch the upcoming playoffs, who knows. If you want to follow along with Caitlyn's journey, you can follow her on Instagram at Caitlyn underscore Vincy, and on twitter at Caitlyn Vincy. And by the way, that's Caitlyn with a why. And you can follow along with this show at and so she goes pod. Thanks for listening.

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