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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 42 · 9 months ago

42. Jennifer King, Assistant RB Coach, Washington Football Team

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How do you know what you want to be when you grow up if no one before you has paved the way? Well, that did not stop Jennifer King from chasing her dreams of coaching professional football. After a successful playing career in football, she made stops coaching basketball at Johnson and Wales and Dartmouth. In this episode she explains how current Washington Head Coach Ron Rivera gave her a chance to prove herself as an intern with the Carolina Panthers, followed by a position in Washington. Jennifer is the first African-American woman to be hired as a full-time coach in the NFL. We talk about why it's taken so long for women to get opportunities like these, what makes someone a good coach, and how important it is that our generation is doing away with the "good ole boys club" in sports.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes. Here's your host, Amanda, Borgeous, hello and welcome in welcome back, Ishould say, I've taken a little mini break from the show. I'm planning awedding, so I have a lot going on most of it's fun, but you know: Planning awedding during covid adds just a little more stress to the normal planningprocess anyway, I'm so excited to be back with an awesome woman, who'smaking history in the NFL. My guests, this week is Jennifer King She's, theassistant running backs coach for the Washington football team and afterstarting as an intern, she was officially hired as part of thecoaching staff, which makes her the first African American woman to be afull time coach in the NFL and, what's even cooler about Jennifer, is thatwhile she enjoys the platform that she's on in order to inspire others andmake a positive impact, she's super down to Earth and she just loves thegame of Football. In this episode, we talk about how her playing careerhelped her in coaching the new generation. That's getting out of theGood Old Boys Club in sports and why it's taken so long for women to getcoaching opportunities in Pro Sports here is my conversation with JenniferKing, hello, Jennifer. How are you I'm good?How are you I'm good? I'm good, I'm so excited to talk to you. Thank you so somuch for taking the time to share your story and to get into everything thatyou've been up to lately so Jennifer I like to start from the beginning: Let'sdo a little rewind. Where did you grow up and how did you fall in love withsports grew up my Reedsville North Carolina S,a small town near Greensborn, Oth,...

Carolina and sports. Just always a partof my life growing up we're always going to games or I watch ome Games onTV. So when I was old enough to join teams, you know I was excited to dothat, because I've been playing already. You know in the backyard and at schoolfor years, so sportsag has always been there for me. So did you know early onthat? You also wanted to work in sports, or at least try to find a way to makethat happen, because not everyone gets to work in sports, even though theylove it. As a kid yeah, I mean you know as Taas a kid all all over the place.You know like a lot of kids was what I wanted to do, but once I got into college I knew I wanted to stay in sport insome way and I was porch management, Major and and I'm getting a Master andSport Administration. So I know it was something I want to do in sport, butThidn Know It was coaching initially until you know I just realized I jus. Icouldn't really get away from like the game, you know, and it was basketballor football. It didn't matter. I just wanted to be around it. I neededsomething to kind of feed that competitive drive that always had that kind of ended. You Know HinCollege sports ender. So what was your first coaching job? I was a volunteerassistant, basketball, coach at Greinsbrok college and at the same time I also startedcoaching like Middle School Football, so coaching's interesting to me,because I mean you would know this more than I, because I'm not a coach, youhave to be a really good teacher. So did you have to learn how to teach oris that something that came naturally to you? I think you cind o learn as yougo. I was Fortue enough to have really good coaches along the way. So literaldid. I know I was taking things and learning things from them the wholetime. So when it was my time to coach, I wasn't a hard transition and you knowI learned on the job a lot as well. I had some great guys I work with so Ilearn from them as I move forward, wel...

...speaking of transition, how did youtransition from coaching basketball to football yeah? It was. It wasinteresting. Oh, I was coaching basketball for for nine years and endup getting a head coaching job at Johnson, O Wellsonversa in Charlotte,and when I moved to Charlotte the Carolina pansarge facility was nextdoor to my job, so I saw them practice all the time and you know doing thosenine nears. I continued coaching football at Lowe levels and I'd alsoave been playing football as well in women's Tacke, football leags and man.Things were starting to happen when were starting to get opportunities infootball, and it was something I always kind of wanted to do. Whatever's, youknow, obviously no representation, so it was kind of like you know. No onelooks like me there, so the chances of me getting there are very small. So Iwas happy coaching basketball and you know long story short. We had a lot ofstosess on basketball. I end up meeting coach Revera. I was had coach to thepanters at the time, an the NFL woens coaches for him and we kind of hit itoff and built a relationship, and he invited me over after, and I thought Iwas going to be there for two days and ended up being there for about fourmonths. So that's kind of how I got how I got started exactly how I got startedwith everything, so it happened really fast and you know. Luckily I was I was preparedyeah I was going to say it was like a mix of being in the right place at theright time, but obviously that's not enough like just because you were theredoesn't mean that you would have gotten the opportunity you had to be ready,and so it's awesome that he saw that potential and you and was willing togive you a shot. And obviously I worked out considering you know what you did with the panthersand then what you're doing now- and you mention something that I do want totalk about before we get into your role now with Washington. You mentioned this,and I read this quote from you about how you didn't have anyone who lookedlike you to look up to when envisioning your future and coaching or really justin general? What did you visualize when you mapped out your future like? Howdid you propel forward without actually seeing that person who's done it aheadof you, I think, with football.

Ultimately, I made the decision thatyou know it's okay to be your own representation, so I didn't think thatwas no longer an excuse for me, and I think that came with a successthat I had in coach and basketball. I had built the confidence, and you knowthat realize I was a pretty good coach so that excusive, no one being therewasn't good enough for me anymore. So I made that decision that it was okay. IfI kind of went ahead and made my own path, it absolutely is okay, becauselook what you're doing now you're paving about for other people, and youknow that takes a lot of courage to do because a lot of people at least me like I'm, a visual learner,and if I don't see someone doing it before me, then how do I know I willsucceed at it. You know like you just you went for it and you're doing it,and that's that's really important, so you mention you work with Ronmavere atthe panthers for those who don't follow football ronevers no longer with thepanthers e is now the headcoach of the Washington football team. So did you because you had worked with Ron Raverabefore he obviously knew what you were capable of? Did he kind of fight tobring you over to Washington? How did that work out? I don't know whathappened behind the seeds. You know during that time after I left thepanthers I I was in Arizona for a while there ason a hot shots, and now I was at Dartmouth the previous I mean the previous seasonfor I haded to DC. So when I got back to North Carolina from Darmouth, he adthen became the head coach at the Washe football team and gave me a call. Letme know an opportunity had for me and I went up and interviewed and thosepromatire. I love how you make it sounds so easy like. Oh, I just wentthere and every nigt Gr no yeah. No, I definitely wasn't it way. It's justfunny. It's funny hearing like the First Person Story, and everyone doesthis- you know like oh well. I did this and then that was that, were theremoments where you were like. Oh, I like really have to prove myself. If I wantthis, or was it truly something that,...

...along the way like once you got up toWashington, you were like this is so meant to be. Like I am aware, I shouldbe right now. I kind of felt like I was were where I should being. Where know Iworked hard to get to so I didn't feel like I had to go in and prove myself inany way, and luckily I already knew a bunch of ourstaff, especially on offense from Carolina. It was a lot of guys that Iworke with before twice so they already knew me already knew them. So that madethings a lot easier and you know the running back coach, Randy,Jordan. He was amazing to work with. We didn't know each other, but we startedquickly building a good relationship with each other, and you know he'sdefinitely somebody that thankful for t lone with Cotrever, because he's beenfantastic. What advantages do you have as a coach because you've played thegame because not every coach, whether theyr male or female, has actuallyplayed yeah. It helps a lot. I mean you've been in the fire before and Ithink the players respect that just because they know you've played and youknot played for a long time and has some success and it helps a lot andjust as far as teaching you teach a little differently just because you'vebeen there before you know sometimes how things are taught it', not how italways plays out in a real game. So you have that idea in the back of your headas well to be able to kind of teach that message as well. How do you carrythe title of being the first Africanamerican woman to become a fulltime coach in the NFL? That's just it's a huge badge of honor and I imagine itcould be challenging to carry since there are so many eyes that are on you.How do you handle that? That's something I'm still getting used to. Iguess I really had no, you know idea of the magnitude mypromotion would be. I never thought about. Oh, I no Wat make me the firstlike I. Never it never crossed my mind and then when it happened, and you knowI start geting, all these interview requests and just everyone wants totalk to me- and I see my name in these these lists of first and it's likeIvven belong this like it's like it's like Mary...

...comate, like my name, it's like come onthe I'm like I just I cook football, but I mean it's it's an honor. I think it'ssomething that I'll look back on later in life and really be appreciative andin proud of my accomplishments yeah. I feel like that's it's a very balancedway to look at it because you are where you are for reason. You deserve to bethere and you've worked really hard to be there but t's. It is a big deal andit's a full circle moment for someone like you who, like you said you didn't,have someone to look up to and now you are that person to so many young girls,young and even older men and women of all colors, and so I think, like you,said, kind of taking a step back and realizing. This is a big deal, but alsostaying focused on the job at hand, and I think that I mean I'm. I can't speakfor them, but I imagine the coaching staff really appreciates that fromsomeone like you, because you do have a job to do whether you are the first oryou're, not the first. You know you still have to. You know come in and andbe successful. So what would you say? The reactions of your coachings, yourfellow coaches, on staff with you and the players have been. I imagine that it's been brought up afew times right, you being the first yeah I mean. I think the funny thingwith the players is when it happened, the ones that you know kind of reachedout they didn't know thiys assumed. I was already like just a regular coate.They didn't even know. I was like a internit or anything like that, so itwas kind of funny to hear that I just assumed they knew and but they just allassumed, I was a ou- know, regular coach already, so the other coaches onstaff, I mean they're great theyre, fantastic. A lot of them are for Gadsof girls, and you know they're happy to see it happening and you know they've all been great, verysupportive and so much knowledge on our staff. It's always nice to be in thesame room with these guys just to learn every single day. That's so great! Soactually I do want to clarify for the audience. You just brought a good point.You started as an intern and then you...

...were promoted. So that's how you arethe first Africanamerican woman, because you were promoted to being afull time coach in the NFL right yeah yeah last year, trying to GE. I waslike a inturn, even though F I mean essentially was. I was a full season,intern full time but yeah. So now I guess my promotion. I have a new titleand I, as it's more permanent, which is funny you say that because, like yousaid like you're doing the same job right, it's just the the drea h Ti oveit where you're like wait. I've been doing this. Why is everyone making thissuch a big deal? What do you think is the most rewardingpart of your job? I mean I get to work with some of the best athletes in the world.You know every single day who want to be better and I get to help try to makethem better now an make them perform at their best on Sunday. So it's reallycool to see guys who are obviously elit and want to be even better and performeven better to to to get to help the grow. It's really cool Jennifer. Why doyou think it's taken so long for women to get opportunities like yours inprofessional sports? I think it's because you know a lot of people, noone leke change. You know, and- and I is definitely a change to to start-hiring hiring women and essentially looking atthe entire aflican pool or some of these positions, and I think it tookcoaches like groose arean like Cochrivera, to really have, I guess, the theoutlook and the somewhat courage to step out and realize that ther are.There are women that can help their teams and their organizations and to beable to do that, and you know therare women playing Oman NFL on the businessside and doing great things, but on the coaching side I think that's what tookso long. It's just it had always been that way and no one was really thoughtabout changing it. Until you know these guys came along and you know saw thattheir opportunities yeah, I mean we...

...talk about not having anyone to look upto when you were younger. Well now you have the women who have been to superbowls where you can look to and be like. Okay, that's what's next for me likethat's, that's where I need to go: Yeah, yeah, they're, they're, awesomeand- and I was so excited for them. I probably they probably got tired of metexting them before Sero Week. I would so excited eahthat's really cool. I would imagineso. I've worked in broadcasting for many years and there's this sort ofsisterhood amongst us because it can be pretty competitive and we try to sticktogether for the most part- and I imagine it being very similar to youand all the women that are female coaches in the NFL. I would imagine that there would besome sort of whether it's you know official or not, but you know just agroup text or you know some way of staying in touch and keeping each otherencouraged to stick together. Yeah, absolutely you know e. We have groupgroup chats and text and it's just good to have becaus everyone's kind of onthe same journey in the same parts of our career, so it's cool to have peopleto Shat with and talk to just kind of going through the samethings, and it mean it's also fun too. It's not always just assen seriousstuff. I it's a lot of fun just to keep up with everybody, an Cirby's doing,yeah, definitely and talk about Super Bowl rings, and you know all that funsuff. So I've seen that you've been a part ofcertain projects recently, so what sort of opportunities have come up for yousince you've become a coach in the NFL? I mean you have this awesome platformnow to reach whoever you want yeah, it's been. It's been interesting, justto be able to Chau with so many different people and to be able to kindof become a mentor to some other people. You know so many people help me getwhere I am to now and it's nice to be able to give back in some way to help.You know that next crop of people coming up, so I think that's been thecoolest part of just being able to share some of my journey with thosepeople to possibly help their journey...

...and now been able to Chattel coop people.Like you just to kind of talk about my journey, you know know it's nice to bewa share on a podcast. You never know you know who might hear this messageand it may help them out. Yeah. Absolutely and that's what's importantto me in sharing stories is even someone that doesn't even work insports at all. I feel like we all can learn from each other, no matter whatwe're doing for a living and what industry be working, and I think justyour story of you know you just kind of pushed through and didn't even havesomeone to look up to to get to where you are, and people can use that as anexcuse and be like well, no one else as done it. How could I dont do it andthen just kind of give up and take a different route? And that didn't stopyou and I'm glad it didn't stop you, because now you are reaching so manypeople on an individual level, obviously with the team that you coach,but then more so, people that look up to you and I've seen pictures of littlegirls who are you know, posting just all about you and how they want to be,and that just must be so cool t', crazy it at it's, unbelievable it. Sometimesit's like thats insane this see to see that it's really special yeah. I BetI'm sure sometimes you're. Like me. Really me ts like what this is kind of a deep question,but what has teaching others taught you Ifeel like there are lessons to be learned. Even when you are spending allof your time, teaching others yeah, I mean one of the biggest things Ilearned in coaching was to you know you can't treat everybody the same so thatthat to do that, you have to really get to know your athletes and- and Ithink that's something that I've been successful. I think that's helped me alot on the pootball side having the different relationships with the guysand being able to to have a...

...conversation with them, not aboutfootball. About L, you know their family of the life. How things aregoing? You really build deep connection, so I think the the best thing I learnedwas to really build those generil relationships with people to help coaching success. What kind ofcoach are you? What would you if I asked your players? What kind of coachYou er? What would they say? Yeah? I mean it's kind of funny, because when Iwas coaching basketball I was I was pretty chilled, but you know I had noproblem like turning it up: Butthochin the guys and coaching the athletes. Youknow, I think, I'm a lot more chilled, because the guy I work with is a littlemore turned up. So I kind of balance us out. I feel you know, and I think thathelps sometimes sometimes the guys are come to me just. I think, because Ikind of look like their sister or their aunty. You know or something Makeit O.I feel a lite more comfortable, especially the rookies, becausesometimes I think, they're a little afraid to ask other questions to somepeople. So they come to me just to ask, but you know this building thoserelationships and have helped so much. You know that's sointeresting. I've actually heard that from a couple other female coaches,that a lot of players feel comfortable coming to them about things that theywouldn't go to their other male coaches about- and I don't know if it's likeyou said a sisterly thing, a motherly thing like there's just something aboutbeing a woman where people can be vulnerable with you and I think that'ssuch a huge thing that is needed in all professional sports, especially insports, where, like masculinity has been such a huge topic for so longabout how you can't be vulnerable, you just got to push through and like can'tcry, you can't do this, and so I feel like bringing females into the mix. I'mhoping is helping to allow allow the players to like know it's okay to bevulnerable and like no ites, okay, that they can lean on you for certain things,yeah, absolutely and I think, working in sports song. You know, particularlyon the maileside, now it's cool, to see kind of a new generation where I thinkit's less of that macho attitude,...

...which has been good to see it's notkind of that good old boys club anymore. You got to be manly and you can't dothis. I really, I feel like it's really shifting more towards the middle withthat, and you know, even our organization did agreat job having open spaces for people to be able to talk and get things offtheir chests and really share things that will botherin nom, which wasreally cool to see yeah, I'm really proud of our generation. I feel likewe're moving a lot of needles in positive ways and we're openingconversations that, even like our parents never had, but we're not theonly people living on this planet, I'm sure you get a lot of negativity online.Just a woman working in sports, I know I've gotten it before. How do you tunethat out and just you know, focus on what's in front of you and and knowthat you're doing the right thing and kind of have thick skin? It's notalways easy to do. Yeah I mean I learned a long time ago. I don't reallylike pay attention to it. I mean sometimes al read comments butessentially like Twittertha. I don't even read what people are saying, andsometimes I probably miss good things because of that, but I don't know I just always had thatmindset that if the people in the building know h I'm doing a good joband you know I'm Awhare I deserve to be. Why would I allow some random personthat I don't know to ruin my day saying something? That's if they're not trueor just ridiculous, so yeah, it's not that hard to avoidpeople on twitter. For me, and sometimes if you do see something you know I might recline my head, but Idon't actually reply just kind of keep it moving that help ethat's all. I need that's kind of W I' handled it. It'snot. It hadn't been a big deal to me because I hadn't really paid a lot ofattention to it. Good, good and- and I would imagine- or at least I hope thatthe positive outweighs the negative, because there's so much positive,that's coming from this-...

...and I know you technically didn't askfor this platform, because you know you're just doing your job, and this issomething you want to do. But you know the fact that you recognize that youknow you are reaching so many people in a positive way. Hopefully thatoutweighs all the stupid comments where people don't know what they're talkingabout, because there are a lot of vidiots out there. You know yeah. I know people are real, comfortable,saying things on. You know: BEA Keyboard, it's cawful, it's awl, welgood for you, I'm glad that you ignore it. What was covid like like what wasthat season? Like I mean so technically that was your first full season withthe team this past year or the year yeah yeah. It was no this past year, so it was a a covidseason for Socia was. It was so interesting, but I get so much creditto the League and R our organization, this wor doing such a good job at kindof policing ourselves to make sure what we did a good job. Don't we need to do,and you know we were never really hurt by any outbreaks or anything, and youknow we testid every day, which was this became part of your normal morningroutine and had about midway through the season. Everything essetially whenvirtual, except for practice- and you know their lifts, so you onlysaw sot of players that practice, which was interesting and all of our meetingsin the morning and afternoons were Veazoom, but we managed you know, and Ithink coshever Tolus the beginning of the season. You know the teams that didthe best job adapting to whatever came along will be the most successful teams,and you know we believe that, and even when I was out in Arizona with the AFcoach, coach Newhilo always talked about being adaptable, adjustable onflexible, and that was definitely a mindset that I think I brought to thisseason Tjus, because you knew at any moment things could change or a newpolicy to go and play, and you can no longer to this. So you got to do thisnow, so really just to be able to...

...handle that and not think too muchabout it. Just because everyone's doing it, it's not like it's just our teamwas something that I used to really move forward and I think we did thebest that we could, and you know I think you saw a lot of things possiblydon't have to be how it's always been owic. Was God force yeah? Absolutely Imean it's opened the way for so many new conversations and new ways of lifethat we never had before. I don't want to say I'm thankful for Covid, becauseobviously it's been terrible for so many people in so many ways, but I dotry to see the positive in tough situations and I feel like we all havelearned so much in so many different ways this past year, and you knowthinking back to the summer and like before the season. I really felt badfor the rookies and I feel, like you, W're kind. You were in a rookiesituation right where you were still a kind of new yeah, because it's not it'snot like a normal season like rookies come in and they learn everything inperson. They learn the playbook and they're, with their teametes, anthey're learning their their coaches and what they want and what they don'twant, and you know you're still learning all of those things, but in acompletely different way that no one has been through before I just I justimagine that being tough. So I have said that, if you are, if you wentthrough that as a rookie like you know that it will never be hopefully fingerscrass knock on wood, that itwill never be that hard. You know like that wasthe hardest year ever and so now it can only go up from here and I'm sure,being in person. Everyone will be so much more thankful for it than theyever were before. Yeah. Definitely it mean for them to go through it andthat's the thing we had. You know obviously rookies that were we neededto have vital roles in in our offmece and Defense D, For them to have tolearn everything on Zoon I mean this is definitely a testament, I think to themand how they had tho become prose, probably a little quicker than thanmost before them, but they did a great job with it. So what are some of yourgoals personally and professionally? I...

...know you just got to Washington, so I'mnot trying to push you out or anything, but you know like what do you want toaccomplish while you're there? I Man Forti for now is really you know band abest, runnerback coach, I can be. You know I'm trying to trying to get better.All the time and coach always talks about Bewherin feet are, and I thinkthat's super important for the players and coaches just to remain focused on atask, a hand and not start looking too far ahead and things like that, youlearn, you know early in Tha, coach and business. You can start looking toofarahead, because you know you may not have a job, so it's important to reallybe present in the moment and that work that you put in will ultimately startleading to new decisions and then opportunities for you but yeah. For now.That's really my goal and I don't have inany like super long term goals rightnow. I kind of take it one thing at a Tim Yeah. I think that's a great way tolook at it and plus I mean, like we just said with covid. Technically, youwere virtually there for some of it, so you still have like a whole year aheadof you of like real in person, and I don't know you know what the plan is togo back and when things start, but I imagine that it will be completelydifferent and hopefully way better than it was last year, and I know early, youmentioned how important the relationships are to you with yourfellow coaches and the players, and you know I feel, like you are someone thatfocuses so much on just cultivating those relationships and building off ofthat at least that's what I get from you and I think that's so important asany coach, as any teacher in anything, is to really just like put so muchemphasis on the power of those relationships and see how far they takeyou. So I love that. What did you say? It's be where your feet are yeah.That's great! That's really good, it's so simple, but it's so I mean I getcaught up all the time like what am I doing tomorrow? What am I doing nextmonth? Like what does my summer? Look like, and it's true like you've got tobe where you feet are otherwise you're not going to get to where you want togo. Thet's awesome advice, I'm sure you have so many amazing little like coach...

...coach speak what Iiwhat, what I callthem. What are they called yeah? You know you learn so many overtime and you know, coaches, all we do is steal stuff from each other. So it's really good. What's the best?What's one thats stuck with you, I don't mean to put you on the spot. I'msure you have so many, but is there one in particular, that's really suck withyou or one that you use all the time. I mean that's one, that I definitely usea lot and you know, and I've heard the story ofit's kind of on the same line, but the story of Navy sales. You know gettingthrough Hillweek and you know so many of them drop out of Hellweek becausethey're just wanted to be over and the ones that make it through typically arethe ones that can take things when thing Gat a time and vie where theirfeet are d. You know when they wake up their first on their first ubjective isto get Tho breakfast because that's the first thing on the schedule not to makeit through the end of the day. So just really taking one thing at a time. Youknow, I think, that's big, that's a story that I love and really whole sotrue to so many things that we do. What is your advice for people who, nomatter what they look like or what industry they're currently in you knowwhen it comes to working hard to become someone or create something thatdoesn't exist yet like exactly what happened with you? What is your adviceto them to just keep doing it and also just do it anyway? Even if you don'tsee it, you could still do it yeah, it's so important for them to beknowledgeable and to be ready for the opportunities that hopefully they're,creating through their heartwork and knowledge. You know I kind of had this personalMontra being so good, as you can't be denied that I developed, then I thinkit's important for everyone. I had that Mondset that you know I have to be. Youknow twice as good mentality, because, ultimately, if you're thatgood it doesn't matter what you are you're going to get an opportunity,because your vital to whatever is neat. How have you dealt with doubtersthroughout your career because you are the first I feel like there are bull.Who would look at you at some point...

...whether it was last year ten years ago,three years ago and say Mi, get it you're good, but you'll never be whatyou want to be had that ever happened to you? No, I never really had that. Ialways had strong people around me that Har supported me and whatever I wantedto do my parents, you know whaver. The person ones always supported me,annything that I wanted to do and just have that mindset of being really goodand whatever you do so I've always had you know goodgoodpositive people around me. I don't think I really keep anything or oranybody around me. Thet would say things like that. Well, that's good!I'm so glad yeah yeah! Sometimes people have like one or two moments where,whether it's someone close to them or not that it just sticks with them whenthey say you can't do it for this reason or you're, not good enough. Forthis reason it takes a really strong person to if they are told that to moveforward and be like well. You know I'm doing this anyway, but it's awesomethat throughout your life, you've had so many amazing support systems,because that's that's important during the journey to and then it's even moreimportant now when you're here, and you still have so much work to do so- I'mso glad that you have that yeah. It's me too yeah. It's awesome! It's really awesome!This is my last and final question for you. It's going to be hard, but it'salso going to be easy and you'll understand what they ask. Who are somewomen in sports that inspire you I mean, I think it kind of goes backfor me to the some of the first women that I saw in sports ecause, because you know itwasn't a lot of women' sports on TV when I was growing up so to see peoplelike Jackie, John, a Cursey, INA garrisonbeyond scurr from the women's national soper team to just see those thoseblack women on TV. W was big to me just because I've never seen lik wheneverlook like Ye, Ow TV player sports, so to be able to see them perform at suchhig levels were Wem, definitely big for...

...me a and now I mean you know, there'sthere's so many that I love and support, but those ware some of the early ones.That really gave me that confidence to play sports and to try to be reallygood. That's awesome. I feel like the early ones when you're young kind ofstick with you, but now you're right we're in a great position where thereare so many that we could name in every single part of sports playing coachingexecutive level and beyond. It's awesome to have so many amazingwomen around us to look up to and you being one of them for so many people is,is really amazing and I don't want to make you blush, but thank you for beingsuch a positive light in oballbecause. It is really important and I'm justexcited to see where you go. So thank you so much Jennifer for joining me. Ireally appreciate you taking the time and I'm so excited to see what this newcovid free- I don't ewant to say at at Lan, I'm going to knock on wood. Thisnew season looks like for you I'm going to be cheering you on. Thank you. Thankyou. So much appreciate it. I was fun traewith you! You can follow, along with Jennifer'sjourney, on Instagram, at Jennifer Dot, King Five and on twitter at Jennifer,King Five, and you can also follow along with this show at end, so shegoes bod as always. Thanks for listening.

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