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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 35 · 11 months ago

35. Ellen Hyslop, Co-Founder, The Gist

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Have you ever had a really good idea and then actually brought it to life? If you're like me, that answer is no. If you're Ellen Hyslop, the answer is...well, I'm sure you know where I'm going here. As a sports fan, Ellen and her friends realized there was a huge gap when it came to fans and how they consumed their sports news. So, the three of them co-founded The Gist. Their mission is to level the playing field when it comes to talking and learning about sports. They're creating an awesome community of people, called Gisters, who come from all walks of life. In this episode, we talk about starting a company from an idea to now having more than 40 employees, creating company culture, becoming a leader, and so much more.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes, here's your host, Amanda, Borgeous, hello and welcome in if this is yourfirst time listening. This is a show highlighting awesome women in sportswomen who have lived through hard times, women who are making a name forthemselves, women who are creating and inspiring and showing us all how tolive our best lives. This episode features a woman who is the cofounderof a company called the Jist. Their mission is to level the playing field.When it comes to talking about sports and Sharing Sports News, you don't needto be anything specific or know anything specific to enjoy theircontent. That is the point of what they do ellen his lip came up with the ideaover one and take out with her other co founders, JC, dehoop and Rosalindmcclardy. I won't spoil he story for you, because it's a good one anywayellen talks about what it's like learning, how to become a leaderestablishing culture at a new company and how the gist plans to grow andexpand in two thousand and twenty one. Here is my conversation with cofounderof the Jist Ellen Hislip, Hey Ellen. How are you hey Amanda, I'mdoing well, thanks. How are you doing I'm good? Thank you. I appreciate it. Iam so excited to talk to you. There is so much to talk about. I know thateveryone's busy, because of the holiday season and obviously when you work insports, especially during this time- There's always a lot going on. So Iappreciate you taking the time yeah thanks, O having me of course. Ofcourse absolutely. I know you have your own podcast. So we'll talk a little bitabout that as well. I'm sure it's fun for you to be on the other side of theinterview, because sometimes when you have your own show it's a littledifferent totally. So I want to start from the beginning: Let's rewind a bit:where did you grow up and how did you fall in love with sports? Oh Gosh, so Igrew up in a very small town. It's called Carlisle and Ontario. There'sabout twohusand people in the town. We don't even have stop lights. We justhave stop signs and there's basically one fourway intersection thatrepresents the entire town, so I grew up in a very, very small town andreally my love of sports started from a very, very young age. I honestly can'ttell you when my loves sport started, because it's just always been a hugepart of my life. My Dad is a massive sports fan and he really taught meeverything that I know about sports today and taught me the love of sportsas a fun kind of anecdote and fun fact. I was his first born child and, on thesame day that I was born, he left the...

...hospital to go to a Blue Jays playoffgame because he had tickets, playof game and didn't want to miss it, and soI think, if that love of sport kind of is indicative to to my love of sports,that's that's really! where it got started, he didn't even get to bringyou to the game. How rude I wish I wish I was like man. If I had thaopportunity, though, and the the flu tas ended up, winting the world seriesthat year so iam like yeah, totally go fhor, I'm glad that he did it it's allbecause of you, you were his good luckcharm. That's what I like to think.So what did you study in college? And what did you think that you wanted tobe when you grew up yeah, so I actually studied business in college whichcoming out of high school. I wasn't sure if I wanted to get into thejournalism side of things and really lean into sports or if I wanted to getinto the business side of things, because I really enjoyed economics andmarketing and math and strategy, and everything like that in high school, aswell so apted for the business route, because I figured I could takedifferent electives within the journalism and writing worlds in orderto kind of stay close to it and to potentially get into the business sideof sports one day, of course, things change over the four years that you'reat school and somehow out of school. I ended up in insurance. Never did I everthink that I would be an insurance, especially as someone who I would liketo think. I'm. You know decently creative more on the communication sideof things really loving sports, but that's that's where I ended up afterschool. So that's the perfect sege, because now you can tell us the storyof how you came up with the idea to start the gist. Yes, that is a decentsegue, so I graduated from school in two thousand and fourteen and I'mCanadian so immediately moved to Toronto, where my job was and a lot ofmy friends from school also move to Toronto. Just because of the dropopportunities in the city so had been working downtown for a couple of yearsand actually in two thousand and seventeen I had tor n my acl playingsoccer, which was just a brutal injury. It was horrible and normally I wouldsee my now two cofounders, so my cofounders JC dehoop and Roslin mclardypretty frequently rosalind and I actually played soccer together everysingle weekend and JC and I would likely meet up at the bars every singleweekend. That's God how? We all hung out, but unfortunately, with my ACL, Iwasn't able to walk so we decided, instead of seeing each other, doingmore active things that one night we would just get together and grab sometakeout and white wine at Rosalind's place, and while we were, you know,shooting the Shit catching up. I started talking about how excited I wasabout the leafs win the prior night and started explaining at this point I twothousand and seventeen what a big deal it was that the least one because itmeant that they were going to make the playoffs and that was supposed to be abig rebuild year. No one thought they were ever going to make the playoffs,but because of austern matthchews and...

...such and such and such at that ended uphappening and in the way that I was talking about it and speaking with JCand Rosin about it and answering their questions, both of them kind of said:Hey, I've never had so much fun talking about sports before and both JAC andRoslind grew up playing competitive sports they're. Both athletes and Iwould say that they were both interested in sports, especially aroundthe playoffs or the Olympics, or something big going on, but they werenever those people to necessarily turn ind jost tune into sport center everymorning or to open up the newspaper to the sports section just because theynever felt like sports were for them or there wasn't a voice that spoke to them,and so from that moment they were kind of like who else do you speak withabout sports and, I kind of Said Yeah Friends text me pretty decently, bothguys girls, whoever just kind of saying you know. What do I need to know aboutthis? I'm going into this business meating, I'm going on this date, I'mplaying fantasy. What should I be knowing, and we really took a momentthere and said how can we scale the experience that JAC and Rosalind hadthat night to so many other people, and so many other women, because if jas andRoson were feeling that way, and even if I was feeling that way as an avidsports fan feeling like there's still something missing in the sports world,then there was likely so many other women that were feeling the same waythat we're feeling disenfranchised from sports, and so literally that night wepopped open another bottle of wine and open up a goole dock and just startedwriting down all of our ideas for how we could basically scale thisexperience that we all had that night in order for more people to be a partof it so much to unpack their first of all. Iknow what it's like to sort of be the only one in your group of friends whocares about sports. It's an interesting place to be aside for my scortsindustry, friends, my friends from home, I'm probably the only one aside fromthe guys that you know care and know about sports. What I'm curious about isyou know there are times where I'll be like. Oh, this is a good idea and thenit just like floats away and that's it or I'll talk with friends and an idea,wi'll pop up and then we're like okay yeah, and then we go back to our dailylives. The fact that you, the three of you, had this idea: wheredid you? How did you have the confidence to know like? Oh, this is acool idea that we should actually pursue. Yeah I mean it did take a while,I would say so. We were all very jazz and buzzing after leaveling Roslind'sapartment that night we were all very excited and the next morning we kind ofOderd the idea or the winrilike. It was both. We were buzzing from a fewdifferent things so, the next morning we woke up, maybea little bit more hazy the next morning, but the next morning we woke up andtexted each other and we're like hey. Are you kind of interested in learningmore about this or exploring this in some type of way? And we all said yes,and so we ended up getting together the...

...next weekend and kind of talkingthrough our ideas, a little bit more and basically putting back on ourbusiness school hats to figure out what was going to happen next with the dest.What research we needed to do, we didn't have a name at that point andreally figuring out what was next and one of the biggest things that was nextwas just asking people what they thought ofthe idea. We definitely did not keep our idea close to our chest. If we werefriends with anyone, we asked them, it didn't matter if we thought that theywere in our target market or not in our target market. The only people who Ithink we didn't tell was people at the office just because we were stillworking our very demanding corporate full time jobs, and so, as we started,telling people within our network, outside of our network, our family andour friends, hearing their feedback and understanding that hey they alsoexperienced the painpoint and that they also felt like sports, wasn't for them,and they were also interested in how sports could change Sho be moreinclusive and to speak to all types of sports fans, as opposed to a lot of theTimes. Today. The sports media in the sports world is really talking to thatavid fan and a lot of the time their target market really. Is that avid malesports fan? And so how could we change it up to really include everyone whowasn't that avid male sports fan was really what we were asking our friendsand family and we were just receiving really great feeback from them, andthen, when we did the research on what I was looking like from a competitiveanalysis standpoint how we were going to make money, how we'ere going tomarket things? What would we all be doing all of that sort of stuff? It didshow that there was this super massive white space in terms of women, creatingcontent in terms of a target market being different than the general targetmarket, and also in the way that people talk about sports on a level playingfield. We really do try to provide content. That is fifty fifty mens towomen sports. Our instagram is completely fift fifty, whereas what wewere noticing is that it was only women, sports or only men sports and to us. Wewere like, as as fans. Our identity is tied to so many different teams into somany different sports, regardless of gender, and also only just women, don'tjust like women sports men, also like women' sports. So we should all betalking about them all in the same conversation, and so it was really thatwhite space that we saw with our research as well. That made usconfident that it could be a great idea. I love the leveling and playing fieldmontor that you guys have, because that is one thing. I think it's so greatthat you guys are doing because a lot of times as you're saying there arenetworks and sports outlets that speak to a fan, that they assume knowseverything or nows upknows the names that they're mentioning with thesecontracts and different things, and I see a lot of people being like who's,that I don't even like what is this and it's not they're, not speaking to them,and so then they feel like they are...

...missing out or they feel a little less than just because theydon't fully understand. So the fact that you see that there are people thatexist that just need to they just neem to be spoken to a different way,because not everyone knows everything about sports fut. That doesn't meanthat they don't love sports. So I love that you've found that and you've kindof like made that your mission, I would say right, yeah. No, thank youdefinitely, and I think I think the key thing that's different is thateverything kind of in this world has its jargon. You know whether you'reworking in the insurance industry or you're, a big beauty, person and you'retalking about makeup ore. You are talking about what the chemicals in themakeup. What have you you know, there's Dargin aroundeverything but jargon being around sports, which arguably is the numberone thing that Unites People regardless of AG rage, gender religion? What haveyou and that really represents almost a marihocracy to us that didn't reallyseem fair, and so we just thought of a way of how can we help sports be moreinclusive for any type of sports fan, whether they know that Dargon and lovethat dragon or if they don't, and they need just a little bit more background?What have you learned about yourself in the process of starting a business withfriends, because I feel like it's almost like living with your friendsright like sometimes it works? Sometimes it doesn't, but starting abusiness with your friends. That's a huge leap of faith to take together,Eah, it's funny that you say living with your friends too, because we didactually live together for almost four months last year to so we've just beentoing at all. We would goin and full force yeah. I mean the great thingabout JC Roslin, and I is that we were friends throughout the four years ofschool, so we knew each other really well and we also played sports together,and I do feel like when you play sports with someone. You get to know someonereally really well and at that other level, and you build that trust in agreat way to and because we knew each other really well, as we recognize that we did really havecomplementary skills, and so, when we're looking at the gist, we all bringsomething very different to the table and we all bring something that makeseach of us better and kind of covers up each of our areas for opportunity aswell or weaknesses. I guess you could say, but I like to frame those as areasfor growth and opportunity instead, and so I think that, because we already hadthat level of comfort, level, of trust and level of understanding as to whatall of our strengths were, it worked out very well, and then we also justtry to do a really good job of separating work from play. A little bit,but also recognizing that play, can for sure be a part of work, and I think thebiggest thing that we've all noticed is that we all enjoy work so so so muchmore than what we did previously, because we get to work with our friendsevery single day. So sometimes it can be tricky and it can be hard, but Ithink if you, if you have the right foundation with someone, then youshould be okay. Do you feel like you...

...have a different perspective, becauseyou know what it's like to not work in sports? I aske that, because I know alot of people want to get into sports and they you know a lot of people ask.How can I get my food in the door? I just want to work in the sportsanddustry. What can I do and I've only worked in sports, and so it's not thatI've ever taken it for granted, but I feel you have a different perspectivebecause you know what it's like to not work in sports yeah and I think that'sone of our biggest value propositions is having never worked on sports.Having never worked in media. Our biggest thing is that we know our audience so well, because wewere our audience and because we still are our audience and whenever peopleask me that question to Amanda, I'm like I have no clue how to get intosports. I started a business to get into sports, so I absolutely have norecommendations outside of creating a startup for yourself, but for us really,that was our valeuy proposition. Is that we fully do understand how a fanspeaks about sports when they try to Bo Sports, what they need to know more,etc, etc, etc, because we were never fully inveloped into that sports worldyeah. Absolutely so how many people are on your team? Oh Gosh, so it's it's kind of set up in a bit of adifferent way. So right now we have for three of us: Co founders workingfull time as well as Gary Ome, who is our amazing social media manager.Working full time, carries oon with us for about a year and a half and we'realso bringing on two more full time, folks at the beginning of two thousandand twenty one, but then after that, because our content is not daily rightnow. In terms of the news letter, we have a lot of people who are parttimeon our team. So in addition to our full time staff, which you could say likefour to six right now, we have about ten to twelve, more people workingparttime on our content team, and then we have about twelve interns workingfor us as well, so between everyone, it's actually pretty big shop of aboutover forty or so people wow, that's bigger than I thought. That's amazing,yeah yeah, it's been it's been really great to be able to honestly be a sideHustle for a lot of folks as well. So a lot of our content team has fulltimejobs, all of our interns ar in school as well or the majority of our internsare in school as well or with the different consultants that we work withor operations. Folks that we work withagain. They have full time jobs and they're able to help us out on the side.So it's kind of cool, because there are so many people who are incrediblytalented in terms of creating content, doing marketing operations. What haveyou and they really do- want to work in sports, but there's not always theopportunity to work in sports full time. So it's a really nice way for them tosupplement what they're doing throughout the day to help us getcreative supplement, their income and all of that as well. Well, you knowwe're stil start up and we can't necessarily take on to too many fulltime dollars. So what was it like for...

...you sliding into a leadership role likehow did you learn how to become a boss? I feel like there are some learningcurves there right. Oh Gosh yeah, there's so many learning curps, I'mstill learning how to be a boss and still learning what that even means.I'm still learning what a boss means, what a manager means reading a lot of books, learning a loton the job asking for a lot of advice, there's so many different things tothink about. When you are a leader, I think the biggest thing that we've beenworking on recently is that continual improvement side of things and that thebiggest thing about being a leader is putting r your ego aside and learninghow to make sure that the others everyone else on your team, puttingthem into the best place for them to succeed and for them to feel likethey're growing and for them to be making an impact and for them to behitting all their goals as well. And how do we as a team, think aboutculture in order for them to feel empowere to do all o that type of stuffas well? So it's always a learning curve and anda big thing to that, I've learned is that leadership is definitely not one.Size fits all. Every single person within your organization is going toneed and want and expect different things out of the leader, and so thatindividualized leadership is something that ve I've found is very important aswell. I love that you brought up the culture of your company because, what'scool is, as we talked about before, you know you coming in from the corporateworld and starting your own business with your friends like you guys havethis opportunity to create whatever culture you want like you set thatstandard, did you guys have a certain process that you went through to reallywhether you wrote things down whether you went off in the woods and playedmusic or whatever you did like? What was your process in determining theculture of the gist? I love the image of going out in thewoods and dancing and N that outyou know at culture. US is something that'sever evolving, because culture, when it was just the three of us, is verydifferent than when we hired on some riders is very different when we hiredon our phoe first ie for first full time. Employee, then when we hired oninterns, then as we're looking into two thousand and twenty one. And so that isthe biggest thing I think for us is that we have a few key pillars in termsof our values and in terms of our mission and our vision. But the cultureis something that we can create, but everyone who we hire ads to it andeveryone who we hire influences it. And so yes, there's that culture fit part.But a big thing for us is yes, there's there's the fit, but also there's theculture ad when everyone is coming into a business, and it's funny that youbring this up because we're still learning an evolving that we'reactually meeting with the business coach tomorrow and for the next week tokind of talk through. How can we best set up our culture for two thousand andtwenty one ND beyond? As our team...

...continues to grow just because it is soimportant because what' set up for the culture really does make this stage forwhat's going to happen in the rest of Your Business Whooll, I love that youbrought that up, because I actually was just going to ask how you learn newthings like where do you? Where do you go to learn new things? Obviously,you're hiring this coach for Your Business? Do you have maybe books thatyou recommend that you have read to learn how to be a boss or a leader orstarting your own business, and things like that? Yeah we do a lot of reading.I think that it really depends on the stage of Your Business. So at thebeginning we were reading books like the lean startup venture deals, all ofthose types of things just to even understand what being in RaunchepernerMentan, what being a startup ment and what it meant to be creating a minimum,vible product and iterating and feedback loops and all of that sort ofstuff. And then, as our team continues to grow and our company contrncontinues to grow, there's different things that we need to work on. I really like Brenee Brown. She hassome really great books. Obviously, Dara lead is a really great one.There's a book that I'm reading right now for new managers, that's from theHarvard Business Review that basically has a bunch of articles condensed intotwenty or so articles. Sorry, twenty or so articles that are moved into onenovel that you can read that I've been finding has been super helpful. Ourbusiness coach is amazing, he's a wealth of information and we meet withhim basically every other week to chat through things that we want to beworking on with him and then. Finally, a huge thing that we have been doing isjust building our kind of Mentor Network of folks that we really inspireto be like or that we really trust, or that we think has some really greatbusinesses or that we think are really cool leaders and those are the peoplethat we learn from the most because they have that hands on experience,especially in a similar field to ours and so surrounding ourselves, withbasically people with more experience than as people who are smarter than us.People who are creative. All of those types of things has been really fruitful. What wouldyou say has been the hardest part of this entrepreneurial journey? Would yousay I don't know if I I don't know if Icould pinpoint the hardest part. To be honest, like I feel like I feel likeevery day is, is challenging, but it's also so rewarding and so fun, and wehave such a great time together and I'm really motivated by what our mission isin terms of leveling the playing field and speaking about sports all the time Imean for me when I look at what my dream job could have been. You know thejust include sports and communication check the disincludes business check.The just is helping women and sports check like it truly is my dream, joband dream career that IV basically creative for myself, and so wheneveryou know you come across a hard day or...

...you're, making hard decisions, and Ithink it's really at the end of the day, the hardest stuff is the is thebusiness decisions that you have to do or if you have to let someone go that'sjust like always the worst, but really those business decisions, and you knowI always try to check myself a little bit and be like how lucky are you to bemaking these decisions? How lucky are you to be in a place that you couldeven hire someone in the first place? How lucky are you that you've literallycreated this job? That's working that you that you started that's now, youknow, has the ability to create jobs forother people to so I I don't know if I could really pinpoint anything thatspecifically the hardest. I feel like it's just part for the course yeah,that's good. Maybe I should have used the word surprise, because I feel likefrom the Ba when you have this idea of something, and then you go into thecreation of a new business. You know no one really knows what they're doing atthe beginning right you just kind of like figure it out as you go, and soI'm sure there ware lots of surprises, good and bad that looking back, youprobably maybe not wish you would have done differently, but you know you justremember as a surprising moment that either like really defined yourbusiness or you, you know you learned from it and moved on. Yes, there'sdefinitely been a lot of surprising moments. I feel like T it's nice andit's good to be surprised, because then that means that you're learning andyou're learning something new and some of those things totally tro point. Someof the things are great surprises like Oh, my gosh. Someone would pay us forthis content. That's awesome and some of them are not so great surprises interms of like. Oh, it's really hard for a team of three women who are creatinga product for UNDERSURF sports fans to go into a room of a bunch of venturecapitalists that are all middle aged men that are avid sports fans thattheyare going to invest in your business. Let's just kind of you knowthat was something that's a not fun, surprise that you thought you couldmaybe change that trend, but turns out you can't. So I think that I think that there'sthose good and really nice surprises and then there's those like a man. I guess you know I'm not surprised, butI thought that we could have been been surprised here, so you were on the forbthirty under thirty list. CONGRETS! That's amazing! Thank you. What didthat mean to you? Oh Gosh, we were, we were so surprised when we got it. Wewere like wait. What what's going on really yeah, I mean what does that mean to us? I think thatit was obviously very validating to what the just is doing and what ourmission is and what we are creating, and I think that the forbs thirty underthirty is more indicative of our team and the brand that were building andare the forty plus people who are on our team really deserve that entirerecognition.

It definitely did you know mean a lotto us to be to be recognized and to have people think about us and and giveus that legitimacy, but I wouldn't say that it wassomething that you know was on my goals. Listar on my you know,what's that called like Jonot the job board, one of I thing like pintrispoardor vision, board vision. Boart see, I don't have one so ma. I don't ee, but Iwouldn't say that it was like. It was one of the things that I wanted to doto feel accomplished. I guess that you could say like it was ye so great andwe feel so grateful and lucky and are so happy that Forbes put us on thatlist and whenever Forbes talks about us, you know we're small business. We willtake all of the PR and accolades that we can get and that we feel like wedeserve, which is which is awesome, and so we loved it. But again, I think Ithink it's more indicative of the team ind the brand that we're building. Then,specifically, you know th the three of us, while speaking of free pub, I wouldlove for you to brag on yourself and your team. What did you guys work onthis year? This was such a crazy year. Sports were canceled for a while, thenthey came back and everything was on all at once, so I feel, like you guys,have grown so much in the last year, even though it's about like ten yearsthe year, two thousand and twenty. So what have you guys accomplished thisyear? What are you proud of? Yeah this year was wild. There was a lot ofpivoting and a lot of changes this year, and that is definitely something thatI'm proud of is how we did take everything and stride and how we manageeverything with the pandemic, with our justers and with our team and with ourproduct and everything like that, reflecting on two thousand and twenty.You know: We've grown our audience by over two hundred and fifty percent thisyear across all of our channels in the way that we connect with ourjusters,which is something really cool, to look back on, because a lot of the timeswe're looking at growth week to week. But when you look at everything from afifty two week perspective, it's really cool to see that two hundred and fiftypercent growth number we started really bringing in meaningful revenue in Q,four, which is something that's been awesome, to show that people do thinkthat our content is amazing. Our gesters are just such a premiumaudience and that were able to monetize. Basically, what we're doing issomething that's really cool. We also launched our own podcast, so would loveanyone who's listening to check it out its called the jest of it. It's hostedby myself, as well as my good friend, Stephanie Rots, and that has beenreally cool to launch a podcast. We launched that in February, so Itasperfect timing just before the pandemic started, but it's been so much fun. None thelessto have that additional channel and kind of outlet in a way to communicatewith aurjisters, and then you know...

...really, I'm also proud of using twothousand and twenty as a way to propel into two thousand and twenty one likeit's been a weird year, the data that we would have liked to get theengagement. Just everything has been different in the way that we can lookat two thousand and twenty. So it makes two thusand a twenty one, even all themore important as we think knock on wood that we're going to go back into aregular sport cycle. Gosh. Can we please, like I, don't know what elsehen do I've put all the good judo out there, I've saged everything like whatmore can we do to start a good and prosperous two thousand and twenty oneseriously speaking of what are some of your goals to Sert the New Year? What eYou guys working on? Yes! So so there's a few things that were working on,which I some of them. I can share with you today, man that some of them we arekeeping close to our chest and still figuring out, of course, so with ournewsletter, which I should mention you could subscribe to at the JessSportscom with our newsletter were potentially going to be extanding to anadditional day, which is very exciting for us and something that our justershave been asking for for a while, so moving from twice weekly to another dayof the week. I can't give you too many details on what day or what exactlythat will look like, but that will come down the pipeline this year. We alsoactually launched merch. So that would be kind of. I guess in something that Ishould have said beforehand, but we did ladch SOM Murch, which was Super Funand awesome to see our justers kind of rocking their merchant does closeshortly. We just did it as a pop up, so we're thinking about different waysthat we can. You have merch. You know in the future whether that's partneringwith different athletes, organizations, artists. What have you? We think thatwe're still going to be testing out, that community side of thingsdefinitely working on the revenue, side and growth side? That's justtablestakes that we need to grow our audience and and monetize as well, andthen we're also obviously looking forward to the Olympics and, what's socool that well have Tokyo in the summer and then we'll have Beijing thefollowing February. So it's like you know. Within eight months we get twoOlympics which is going to be great and I'm sure everyone in the sportsindustry is excited, but also scared. At the same time with how much workthat's going to be, and so we have a lot of. We have a lot of fun thingsthat we hope to knock on would again be able to put out for the Olympics, socool. That is exciting. I somehow like put the Olympics in the back of mybrain just because there's speen so much that's that's gone on and you justreminded me: That's amazing, also guys signing up for the just newsletterscompletely free. So there's no excuse go sign up, elast question from me:Ellen Sorry, to put you on the spot, I'm sure Yo have multiple, and that isfine, but can you please leave us with a woman in sports who inspires you?Okay, so do you mean an athlete or do you do you want to go more than any?You want to to be anyone whoever you...

...look up to whoever inspires you,whether they inspired you as a kid whether you just met them via aszoom meeting or somethingrecently or you watch them on TV. It doesn't matter whoever inspires you canonly choose one. No, no! You don't have to okay. I will okay, if I can do like to, that would be great. So the first one is Jennifer Hedreu.She is a sports caster from TSN, so ESPNS APHILIAT here in Canada, and whenI was a kid, I always wanted to be a sports caster on Tsand. That was justwhat I wanted to be and what I wanted to do, and it was truly because ofJennifer hedger. She was, I think, probably the first woman who I saw onTV talking about sports, and I just thought that she was the coolest personever and I've had the chance to meet her now, which is so cool. She is sohard working knows her stuff inside and out is so confident. I just think thatshe's amazing- and so I would say her just because Little Ellen was- wastruly truly obsessed with her. Then I do have to say I do really look towardathletes the most in terms of learning from them about the leadership side ofthings composure. All of all that type of stuff, like I definitely look lookat athletes in in that way in terms of you- can learnso much from what they do on the field or on the court and bringg that backinto your personal life, and so for me, I do always look at Christinesinclaireas well as Serena Williams, and just see the type of leaders that they are,what they're like on the field and on the court, what they do off the field,their demeanor and they're, both very, very different, but I think that theyboth bring because they are different and makes methink about different things in different ways that you can show up towork and in your day to day life to great choices. I love that yeah. I just I just choose the bestathlete it's just the goats Aey, of course. Of course, I love that wellAllen. Thank you! So much it has been a pleasure talking with you. I love whatyou guys are doing. I've been following following along this year and I'm soexcited to see what you guys do in the New Year. So cheers to a brand new,beautiful two thousand and twenty one thanks Amanda An d thanks. So much forhaving me on. Isn't she so great, I'm always soinspired by people who have great ideas and then just run with them. It's socool that her and JC and Roslind all came together to create something thatreally is needed in the sports space and they're good at it. The communitythey're. Creating really is something special and you can be a part of it. Ifyou want, you can sign up for their newsletter to get digestible and fundsports news, sent straight to your inbox, go to the Jist sportscomnewsletter to sign up, and you can keep up with the just onsocial by followingthem at the just USA and for my Canada,...

...friends at the just news, dot ca andyou can keep up with me at, and so she goes pod on instagram and on twitter.Thanks for listening.

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