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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 33 · 10 months ago

33. Claire Lessinger, COO, Tampa Bay Super Bowl LV Host Committee

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ever wonder what it takes to plan sporting events, big and small? As the Chief Operating Officer of the Tampa Bay Super Bowl 55 Host Committee and the VP of Events for the Tampa Bay Sports Commission, Claire Lessinger can give you a crash course. Using her playing and coaching career to her advantage, Claire has climbed to the top of the leader board as the queen of event planning for Tampa. Her biggest test is still to come, but she is enjoying every minute of planning The Big Game.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes, here's your host, Amanda Borgeous, Hello. How are you welcome in this is aspace to highlight amazing women in Sports. I've been so fortunate to havespent the last thirty plus episodes meeting and learning about so manyinfluential women in this industry. Some of them are big names that youmight already know, and others may not be considered famous by any means, buttheir work is just as legendbary. That being said, my guest this week is alittle busy planning a huge football game that happens every year. You'veprobably watched it at least once or twice, hopefully, you've even watchedyour own team play in it this year. The Super Bowl is in Tampa and clairlessenger is in charge of making it a success. In this episode Claire- and Italk about how she went from coaching volleyball to planning sporting eventswo talk about what exactly it takes to plan a superbowl during a pandemic, andwe also highlight some things that, as a fan watching the game, you may noteven think about without further ado. Here is my conversation with the ChiefOperating Officer of the Tampa Base Super Bowl, fifty five host committeeand VP of events for the Tampa Bay sports commission, Claire Lessenger, Hello, Claire. How are you I'm good?How are you I'm great? Thank you thanks for joining me, I'm really excited tohave you on the show. I love having Tampa people on to talk about all theawesome things. They're doing so, I'm super pump to talk to you. I know youhave tons going on, so I do want to jump right in let's start with a littlerewind. Where did you grow up and how did you fall in love with sports? Well, I grew up primarily here in clearwater, so we moved from New York to clear water when I was in fourth gradeso grew up across the bay truly like. If you were interviewing mymom right now, like ball was my first word. You know I was. I grew up in theday and age where my parents rang the bell for me to come home from outsidefor dinner. Athletics and sports has been like aslong as I can remember, just a a passion of mine and truly atthe like center of like who I am, and what whatI've always loved so was really fortunate to grow up here inFlorida. You know where I could play many sports all year round and kind of find my passion. You knowhere in the bay area. So what was your first job after college, my first job after college? I actuallywas the assistant volleyball coach at Boston College, so right fromgraduation, I jumped in my car drove north and got my first opportunity in thecoaching profession, which was was my goal and dream. So I wasn't there. Long, though, waswas really fortunate to get the opportunity to come home, which manycoaches been their whole lives and careers doing, and I was really happyto get out of that bitter cold weather, although I loved Boston, what a coolcity, but I came back pretty quickly to the Tampa Bay area and was theassistant volleyball coach at USF and went on to become the head coach foreight years, Os speent thirteen years coaching at the D, One level wow. Soit's funny when, when people love sports- and they say they want to workin sports, sometimes it takes some time to figure out exactly what you want todo, and so it seems like you, found...

...coaching right away and stuck to that.But you are no longer a coach. So how did you make the shift from coaching toa more executive role? And how did you kind of figure out that? That's whatyou wanted to do sure yeah! You know, I think, a little bit of luck and definitely alot of passion. You Know My coaching career because itlanded me back here in the Tampa Bay area. I got the the incredibleopportunity to work with my now: Current boss Rob Higgins at USF, and soyou know many times, it's not what you know. It's who you know and developingthose relationships along the way that that truly pay off and in two thousandand nine, while, while I was the coach out at USF, our community had theopportunity to host tha two thousand and nine NCA Women VolleyballChampionship. So I served on that local organizing committee, you know kind ofin a a capacity of of a thought leader representing the sport here locally, and I was just enamored like I was inall really of what the sports commission did and it was so fun to. Although I hadbeen a student athlete a played at the highest level, you know I was coaching at a high level to see what goes on behind the scenesand preparation of recruiting these major events to our community and then,of course, rolling out that red carpet and ensuring that the student athleteshave this first Classi experience and driving visitors and tourism to ourregion. As a result, these major events- I just thought it was the coolest thingever. I so enjoyed my opportunity and experience to sit at that table andhelp our city shine and- and quite honestly, like I dreamed O er since I had thatopportunity, like oh my Gosh, how do I? How do I get that job? How do I work atthe sports commission and and fast forward? You know a handful of yearsafter that Irob reached out to me and the timingwas right and I took a leap of faith and my my career in sports pivoted. Youknow from from on Corch and on Court and coaching to you know helping recruit majorevents to our community. There was a lot of transferable skill sets that tha.Quite honestly, I wasn't even realizing or aware of at the time, but that background in sports. My experience is a former player and acoach really. You know translated quite nicely to theto the role I'm now fulfilling today with the sports commission and and oneof the things that was like an instant hook for me, although I had tons tolearn, don't get me wrong. The learning curt was was big and wide, as I was.You know, navigating he, the sports business industry and definitely thetourism an hospitality industry, but when I saw that the sports commissionstag line and Mantra was game day every day, that was something that I was like.I get that I get that whatever you need me to do. I can live and die by thatMontrea. So it's been, I mean it's been an incredible experience. I have lovedevery min of it. I cannot believe I've been here almost nine years already ina handful of different capacities and and truly I'm so grateful and blast.You know that that rob really took a risk on me. What a nontraditional youknow type of hire. Quite honestly, I think he saw things in me. I didn'teven see him myself and you need those people in your life. Absolutely. I love hearing stories ofpivoting, especially these days. I think a lot ofpeople are facing interesting choices. You know whether it's because of coidor not, we all sort of reach, a point where we have to kind of evaluate andfigure out. What's next, so from coaching to planning events like yousaid, there was a bit of a learning curve, but you've been doing this forenough time. Now, where I feel like you can you can speak to the success ofevents, so there are obviously a lot of moving pieces when you're planningthese big time events and we'll get...

...into specific big time events very soon.What is your secret to planning a successful event? Wel? You know, I think, there's there'sno one ingredient. I think what we're really fortunate you know- and I'veonly done this in Tampa, so I'm super biased,but I think you know one of our keys to success and key ingredients to successis our people I mean we just have, and we refer to ourselves, and I don't justmean we meaning the sports commission. I mean our entire community refers toourselves. Is Team Tampa Bay and that's truly the mentality that we have when it comes to collaborating and working together toensure that the Tampa shines on the biggest of stages, and so the way thatthat resonates with our clients and our good partners at the NCBLA or the NFLor the NHL is is just one that I know is a game changer and a separator whenit comes down to other host communities and host cities, and I'm just so proudof that and then you lay or in you know, were destination and our weather andour venues, and you know we check a ton of boxes, but at the endof the day, it's our people that that really make this place special. We constantly say you know it's notwhether we win the business. This isn't how we judge our success, an whether wewin the business, it's whether we win it back and we're hosting major eventsmultiple times were winning them back quicker than any other city, we'rehosting events more than any other city. And so that's truly. You know that'sthat that attributes to the way in which this community rallies andsupport of what we do, but also just the the pride that we have in thiscommunity to show it off and ensure that you know that bar is being raisedevery time. I'm going to give you a minute to brag. Can you highlight acouple events that you've Ben and planned successfully that you're proudof I'm sure there are more than a couple, but for time sa? Oh Gosh, Imean, I can't think of you know again, I'm Goinna I'm going to give all thecredit to this community and and the people, but I can't think of an eventthat we've hosted that that wasn't a success, but we're coming off the heelshere, most recently, just due to Covid, because last year's events, erecanceled and being you know the two thousand and nineteen women's finalfour last last host of the the NCW women's final for and it was, it was a tremendous success andthe what makes that event and every event is special in its own unique way.But what makes that event really special and as near and dear to myheart, is that it has so much social and legacy impact built into it. TheNCLA commits so much of their time, effort and energy and decreating. Youknow experiences and opportunities for underserved communities for Girls andsports mentorship women's initiatives an so you know again the opportunity to layer all of that into our communityand rally our community and support of those programs. We have actually we launched a legacyprogram alongside the two thousand and eight women final for so over ten yearsago we hosted it was a luncheon, a women's empowerment, luncheon that wecalled beyond the baseline. When the women's final for rerturned back in twothousand and fifteen, we decided to launch a four part series of beyond thebaseline, and so we layered in all sorts of programming from networking toprofessional, develop, Tomittorship and rolling out of the two thousand andfifteen andcw women's final fourt championship. The NCA took that withthem they have now trademarked it. It lives within their event, footprandevery host city, so a legacy initiave.

We started here in Tampa has now becomea legacy initiative of the NCLA women's final for and we still host them aswell. So we pivoted to use that word again andwe rebranded ourselves to the beyond series and if you were to go on ourwebsite, you would see a tab title beyond series and we've hosted awomen's empowerment event alongside every major event in this community.Since then, we just rebrand it so beyond the blue liner, beyond the goalline. So it's been a commitment of ours back to our community and and thenprobably, of course, the most rewarding that the NCLA has taken this with themand a Tampa legacy lives on within their championship forever. So that'sthat's a story and and an impact initiative that that we are so proud of.But it's just a direct result of how these major events you know, can leavethese lasting impressions and host communities. And then you know we saidattendance records not just invenuand at the Games, but at the ancelaryevents because of our unique destination were able to take standard.You know ballroom type events and move them outdoors and alongour riverwalk,and so again it's just so fun to reimagine these events each time theycome back to our community and then leverage the assets in Tampa Bay thatare ever changing ever developing, and so it is it's such a blast and sorewarding so clear. There's this one event that you're currently planning-and it's not really a big deal just this like small little football game,that's happening in February. In case I did a really terrible job of thoosingthat I'm talking about the superbowl, which I know you know, but ourlisteners might not know so, there's so much to talk about with this. I want tostart from the bidding process. Explain to us how one bids for the Super Bowl, sure, yeah and similar to all of ourbeds. You know an RFP is distributed to the host cities that are interested inbidding and then a you know, really timeconsuming comprehensive process in order to you know, submit that bid back and makesure that we can deliver on all things that the NFL is looking for and from ahost city, and so we work in such close collaboration and partnership with somany partners. As you can imagine, you know, from the Tampa Sports Authority,in Raymond Jame Stadium to the bucks, to the hotel years to the venuepartners and all of all of the you know, obligationsand requirements that that bid needs to fulfil, and then it goes to the ownersand, ultimately the owners you know, will decide on those future super bowl,hlose cities, what's unique about our hosting opportunity this year, is we originally weren't, selected or chosen?This was supposed to be La's year and with their stadium, renovations and constructionfalling a bit behind you know. Tampa was unanimously votedby the owners as the city to step in and fulfil thathis hosting opportunity. So we couldn't be more fortunate and,although yes were diseas Ar unprecedented times and someunchartered waters, Tampa is just still so thrilled to be welcoming back ourfifth Super Bowl and our community has embraced it like they always do and andultimately our number one goal is to be great partners to the NFL and, ofcourse help our community shine on the biggest of stages once again so Tampa his awarded the Super Bowl.Where do you start like? How do you figure out? Okay, there's there's somuch to do. Where do we begin yeah, you know our our structure is unique and it'sdefinitely a huge benefit and, quite...

...honestly, an asset to our partners and our clients, because what we don't do is we don't createbuildup, teardown host committee models. What you'll see in a lot of othercities is once you know, the the bidding organization or the leadorganization that helps put the bid together, whether whether it's afranchise or whether it's the venue or whether it's a sports commission or aCVB once they win it, then they kind of hand that bid over and they build up aa host committee. You know by hiring an executive director on down and thenthat team kind of gets the bid and and then helps deliver it and concert withsome of those key partners. What we do is were we're the engine behind the bidprocess. You know where the team, in the room with our partners, like thebucks and and Ur, and our Stadium Partners, bid delivering that presentation andthen once awarded. We are also the team that then delivers on the promises made.So our team shifts from our sports commission roles all still wer allstill wearing dual hats, and then we fulfill major roles and obligations on the hostcommittee, so rob Higgins. The CEO of the Tampa Base sports commission isalso the CEO of the TAM base. Superbowl host committee and you can go on downour staff and those roles that were filling are the same rules. We fell onevery major event, so not only is there continuity and consistency, but againyou're getting the group that made the promises, they're the ones deliveringthe promises, and we have just found that that the way from a strategystandpoint, but also from a cant nuity standpoint and a relationship buildingstandpoint. This is such a successful model. So, although yes, once theCanfetti fell in Miami, and we were on the clock, you know we all just sort offell into our lanes and we started doing what we what we know how to do- and you know, embraced those those expertises and started workingdirectly with the NFL' staff, and it has been you know around the clockplanning for Super Bowl. Fifty five you know for for. Oh, my gosh were likeeighty days or something less out so for months and months, and it's been an incredible process, so I actually participated in the SuperBowl halftime show in two thousand and nine when Bruce Springstein performedat Raymond James. Oh, that's awesome yeah, it was. It was a very importantrole. I was one of hundreds holding a glowstick in the crowd. You probablysaw me out there. I share that because I remember I played the smallestsmallest possible role that one could play and there was so much going intoit. We had rehearsal there were so many people involved ind. I think, as fanslike you assume, there's a lot that goes into planning the biggest game inthe NFL, but you have a different perspective because you're in it sodoes it feel that big when you're in planning mode or can you not letyourself go there because there's thereare so many things to accomplishyeah. I think no, I think, as an event planner. Of course you can. You can definitelyfeel the magnitude of the event as you're planning it and and quitehonestly, that's what makes it so fun. You know when you realize how manymoving pieces there are. There's such a level of respect and admiration forwhateveryone is doing in everyone's role because it takes a village. It'syou know, it's the outsiders perspective that doesn't get that. So Ithink you know when you are behind the scenes and you realize how many folks are involvedin pulling each and every piece of this off. It's it's. It's really rewarding and you know...

...we're fortunate. We have a really leanteam, I mean we're, you know we're a smaller team, but we wear so many hats and you know we truly love what we do. Ialways say I refer to us as grinders like the busier. It gets the happier weare, we love the Adrenalin Rush, and so with an event. This is my first superbowl and you know it's definitely. You can just because of the magnitude of itand and the size, scope and scale of it. The that Adournalin rushes is happeningmuch further out than you know, save m some other events, but it is unbelievably fun and unbelievablyexciting and yes are there long days and tireless days, but but it's really, but we what what we thrive on. We lovethis and then I always like the best piece of advice. I remember rob gave me early on. It may have been my firstmajor event with the sports commission, but he said you don't forget to stopand smell the roses, and I always share that with folks, because it's so easyto get caught up in the process and the planning and there's never a time. Youknow you always feel like you need to be somewhere doing. Something is liketake that time, whether it's on the Riverwalk, when you know all the fansand in they're in their jerseys and theyre, enjoying this downtown walkablefootprint- and you know they're passing by yacht village or there you knowwhatever it is, make sure you stop and just take a moment and go wow. We'vebeen planning this for months, if not years, it's now come to life. Thelooking decoreis up all over the town like because it when it goes away andit happens so quickly- you shift into post event, depression, which is a realthing, and so you know that's that's always. I try to remind myself that,when we get into the thick of event, week is to find ways to just stop pauseand embrace, because it's so special, I'm glad you said that that isimportant, especially when you're used to planning multiple events you get ina rhythm of okay, it's another event. These are the things we need to getdone in order for it to be a success, and in this case like who knows, youmight not get to plan another super bowl after this knock on what I don'twant that to happen. I'm just saying like it is important to just rememberthat you need to just sort of live in the moment and not think past. This event this is this- is a reallybig deal for not only your career if we think about it in a selfish way, butjust for the community, like you've, been talking so much about it's goingto be a really amazing thing and not to you know, switch to something that wedon't love to talk about, but you allude to this before there have beenadditional challenges when it comes to planning the Super Bowl this yearbecause of Covid, I'm sure we could dedicate an entire episode of talkingabout Covid. I don't want to do that. No one likes talking about it fortime's sake. What has been the most difficult thing to deal with in yourplanning efforts when it comes to Covid? Well, yeah, I think it's the unknownright, I mean as an event planner. You just want answers. You want, you knowclaridy. I think. If anything I mean we couldalso spend a whole show talking about silver linings right, I mean, I think,if anything, we've all learned to be much morepatient and control the controllables and- and you know, make sure that we'reputting our effort in areas. You know that are a priority at thetime, and then you know just just being flexible and- and I think you knowthere's that that's been a challenge because we just have to pause and wehave to wait. You know for answers in certain scenarios, but I think what'sbeen great, for us is yes, there are stillunknown and there's things that that are going to change in the landscape ofthis superbowl, but there's also three...

...things that won't change, and I thinkour team does a really good job of spending a lot of time in these areas,because it's what our focus needs to be again, it's what we can control and themedia and marketing exposure is going to be astronomical, as italways is, but maybe more so than ever, and leveraging that opportunity for ourhost community, and you know telling Tampa's story and helping control thatnarrative is really important to us. Of course, as I mentioned this beforeis our relationship with the NFL. I mean they are unbelievable partners. They are experts in this space. Soagain navigating you know whether it's covid mitigation,our health and safety protocol or event, preparenes guidelines in stadium,prepareness, guidelines, working side by side with them and their team and incomplete lockstep. The communication is, at an all time, high we're truly inthis together. The partnership's never been stronger and for us that'ssomething we just truly value and and is an absolute priority of oursand an investment of ours that that is soimportant and then, maybe even more importantly than bothof those is this social and legacy impact. So our host committee raised amillion dollars which is matched by the NFL, and so a two million dollarinvestments going back into our community. We have identified six pillars in whichthese dollars are going towards, which are focus areas and at the end of the day, again moreso than ever. There is such a need during these times, and so we've beenso thoughtful, so strategic working cloli closely with stake holders andbeneficiaries to ensure that the these two milliondollars invested back into our host community leave a for ever impressionand so again, when we, you know, can step away and whether we're you knowplanning events or we're working with hotelers oere working on transportationplans or security plans. You know again, we can fall back on these things, thatwe know won't change and, and that's really what what drives US daily. Canyou highlight an aspect of planning the Super Bowl that you think fans would besurprised to know? Oh my gosh, I mean there's so many I'm sure there are a lot yeah. You knowit's kind of been. This has been one of those eyeopening experiences, becauseI've been working primarily virtually and that's another thing I mean we'vevirtually planned. He Super Bowl. For the most part, the NFL has not been intown a ton which, which will be a success in itself, but you know my I'mhere and in my home with with my husband, who doesn't normally go towork with me or my kids, and so this perspective. You know that they nowhave they're just mind blown by what goes into planning a major vet. Ofcourse, they're. Getting the you know, they're getting the Super Bowl plans,so it's a whole different level. But from my perspective, an thisprobably just has a lot to do with you know some of the areas and which I helplies or manager oversea, but the public safety security peace is is incredible. You know not only the amount ofagencies that are at the table, andsuring. You know that that everyoneis safe but working with the NFL security and their protocols and theirbest practices. It is an incredible process that takes hundreds andhundreds of folks to be all in the same page, the the information sharing you knowthe the thought sharing that goes in to e the public safety and securityside of the game, and the events...

...is one that I think again. If peoplecould be let behind the green curtain and truly know and understand, you hopethere's never a safety ansecurity issue, but when you see them planning how toprevent them and ensure that there aren't safety and security issues, it'sreally incredible, I'm always so proud and I always feel so safe because hereI am in the room with you know: TPD FBI, Bom Squads Lok, it's it's a phenomenal phenomenal process and Iam always so proud of how our community leads in that space and work so closelywith everyone. You know from again from the venue to the hotels you know totransportation, it's a mind, blowing process. I bet- and I can just imaginehow many moving pieces there are with everylittle aspect of the game at the stadium itself. Also on the broadcastside which I have experienced with not was super bowl, but ihave experience onthe broadcast side. There's just there's so much that t goes into it andI love how you've mentioned team work at and community, and that's soimportant, but on a personal level, if we zoom in just a little after all, issuid and done what would make this event a success for you. You know I I'mjust like one, I'm a half glassful person and- and I also you know just like to haverealistic perspective and at the end of the day- and this is this- is how Iwalk away from every major event is, you know, did, did we do everything wepossibly could that we leave no stone unturned, whether it's from a marketing and communication stanpoint, whetherit's you know from the events that were hosted- and I think we just like that'sthe pride that we have in being event planners is- is that the experiencewhether it's guest experience, whether it's fan experience, whether it's localexperience? You know whether it's team experience is that the the the conversation coming out of Tampa is a positive one and that they feelthe warmth from our community, not just the weather, but the people, as Imentioned earlier. I think that is that's the number onegoal. That's what's so rewarding. I remember postwomen's final, for youknow again we had there was there. Was You know? The Cherry on topwas that these games were phenomenal. They came down to Buzzer beaters allscripts. We couldn't write but were awesome, but it was the the medias. You know praise of Tampa's hosting effort, andit was the praise of you know, Genoriama, and the experience is tonathletes here in Tampa from the second they touch down at the airport. Youknow to the second, they were tipping off and the arena, and I think thatthat's to me like what why I do what I do is. We hopeeveryone feels you know this, this sense of communityand they love every minute of their time and Tampa,and they again feel that welcome and that warmth at every turn from ourpeople and to me, that's that's when we chalk it up as a big win and I'd be ErMiss, of course, if I didn't say that the legacy impact- and that's that's myoversight and it's my baby is telling the story and covering and bringingawareness to all these amazing community organizations and not forprofits and and the families and the kids and the youth in our communitythat are going to benefit from this...

...investment back in into our community t. At that we canhelp. You know truly impact. Positive change again is a big piece of why I dowhat I do so cool, so you've been doing this for several years now. What haveyou learned about yourself, post, pivot, postpivot, postcoaching, yeah, Oh man, so what I've learnedabout myself is, I definitely don't like being bored. Well, that's good! Ithink that is at Studen Atle, yes, we'weve rarely hit lals and that's another thing that I'm so you know thankful for ever since I'vebeen at the sports commission, we've had a major event on the horizon orevery year. So it's you know we're moving from one to the nexts andsometimes overlapping in the planning process. So it's Nethere's, never biglulls, but when things slow down and whether that's maybe August, I findmyself toiling my thumbs. Is I love to be busy? I hate to be bored what one thing I also have learnedabout myself and this job really does kind of accentuate it. Is I love toContin to continue to learn and so again with a small team that getschallenged to step up and in different roles when needed as needed? Is thatprofessional development opportunity is constant, and you know I'm so gratefulfor rob and his leadership style, because he empowers our team to step in and lead and you know helppass a Beton in terms of you know, take this and runwith this, and so never ever. Do you feel like you're hitting a ceiling ofyou know this? Is it my my you know, I'm at the end of my road, I'm notfeeling challenged, I'm not. You know feeling valued. It's an ongoing everchanging kind of personal professional journey, a that this profession and n at theSports Commission specifically has provided me, and I realize how much I I need that, and I I appreciate that and I embraceit is. I love to learn and IAM learning from the best in the Biz every day andfrom my colleagues and our partners in this community, and it's amazing that is amazing, okay,clear last question: Who is a woman in sports who inspires you, I'm sorry toput you on the spot, and I know that there are so many, so you can say morethan one if you like. Oh there really are how to like boil this one down. You know, I think it's an easy one, but but I you know, Ialways share. She said such an integral role in my life as a mentor, but also was you know for me, one ofthe the first high profile women in sports that I had an opportunity youknow to play for and that's Mary wise at the University of Florida. The hadvolleyball coach still the head, volleyball coach, winningtiss femalecoach in the country, but she her leadership, Style and hercoaching style is, is unbelievably contagious and youknow having thet opportunity to play for her and play it at a high level forher. Is You know what what made me want to go into coaching, and so I'm just so grateful for theopportunity that I had to play at the unversity of Florida to play for MaryWis to develop lifelong friendships and the teammates you know at that I playedwith, and I will always always take...

...that experience with me, and I thinkyou know that that teamwork in that Kamaraderie, that that you get an experience from playing teamsports, absolutely translates to business. And you know our current our currentenvironment. Our team is absolutely just like just like a team that hitsthe court every day, as I mentioned our Game Day, everyday mentality, so Maryhad a huge influence in my life. There are so many others. I couldlistene forever. I MASHELA Johnson, who here locally, has you know she ownsINIS Brook and is very well. She owns lots of things you know, but she has been right there with us every step ofthe way on all of our bidding and hosting efforts for every woman's finalfor we've brought to this community and so to have the opportunity to get to noSheila and how impactful she's been, and breaking barriers and glassceilings left and right. I so admire her and I'm so grateful.You know that that there's a a friendship and a partnership- that'sbeen developed with her here locally because of her love and passion forwomen's basketball and her affiliation with our community and EnisBrook and and the Val Par Championship. But I really could go on forever andever there are so many women out there that have been so influential in mylife, but it's just so great to continue to see women left and Wright,breaking barriers, getting opportunities sliding into GM roles andMajor League Baseball. It's it's the it's the year of thewoman. I really do. I do feel that there's amazing things happening forwomen in Sports. It's so true. It's an awesome time to be a woman in sportsand it's really cool to be surrounded by women who are like minded and, likeyou said who are breaking barriers, and I love that you highlighted to womenwho are more local. Sometimes we hear about a lot of inspirational women whoare on a national stage, which of course is amazing, but just hearingabout more local community women, it's really important to highlight themso claire. Thank you so much for your time. This has been such a pleasure. Iknow that you have so much to do as you count down to February, but thank youso much for sharing your story and shutting some light on what it's beenlike for you to plan, so many amazing events for Tampa, but, most importantlynow, these dayss is planning the Super Bowl and making things safe foreveryone during this crazy time. So I wish you the best of luck in this finalcountdown and I'm even more excited to watch the Super Bowl now, oh well,thank you so much a mand. I appreciate it so make sure you pay attention to asmany details as possible when you watch the Super Bowl in February. I know I'llhave a bit of a different perspective this year. I hope you enjoyed listeningto clear story of how she used her playing and coaching skills to thrivein a brand new role that has led her to accomplish so many things. I reallylove hearing stories like hers. If you want to follow along with this show onsocial media, you can follow me at, and so she goes pod on instagram and ontwitter I'll catch. You next Thursday, thanks for listening.

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