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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 10 · 1 year ago

9. Cayleigh Griffin, Houston Rockets Host and Reporter, AT&T SportsNet

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

After growing up in a basketball family and playing herself, Cayleigh made the decision in college to put the ball down and pick up a microphone instead. Since then, she's has had the privilege of working for 3 NBA teams, the San Antonio Spurs, the Cleveland Cavaliers, and now the Houston Rockets. We talk about what it’s like working for 3 powerhouse teams in the NBA, interviewing big names like Russell Westbrook, and James Harden, and Coach Popovich, and so many others. Cayleigh had an unfortunate setback early in her career that she talks about, and we also get into whether or not basketball will be played again this season. Cayleigh offers great insight into life as a reporter in the NBA, the camaraderie between other females around the league, and her relationship with her mentor, Doris Burke.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes, here's your houst, Amanda Morgis Hello. I hope you're having a good dayby now, we've all sort of settled into shelter in place, and that looksdifferent for everyone, but I hope you're finding ways to be ok today andfocusing on what you can control to get through this. I know there's a lot ofuncertainty right now, but just no! You are not alone, if you are just tuninginto my show for the first time. Thank you a little background on me. I'm asports journalist by trade and a storyteller by heart I spent the lasteight plus years, working as a sports toast and reporter in radio and on TVand in digital. I've spent time in Florida, where I grew up in nychtraveling with the newyork Rangers as their team reporter and now I live inthe bay area of California. I moved out here to be a host for Yahoo sportshosting fantasy football shows and F. l draft shows interviewing athletes andcoaches and covering big events, and then I got laid off a few months ago,so I started this podcast for years. I've been inspired by so many awesomewomen in the sports industry and I formed relationships with so many ofthem that I wanted to create a space to not only meet new women but to sharestories of females in sports, so you can get to know them on a personallevel. I really hope you find value in these conversations and leave withsomething that you can apply to your own journey. Whether you work in sportsor not, today's guest is Cayley Griffin. She is currently the Houston RocketSilen reporter and host for Atandt sports nut traveling with the teamconducting interviews and providing ingame reports. Heli is from thenortheast. She grew up playing basketball. So we talk about how shemade the decision to put the ball down and pick up a microphone. Instead,Pelias had the privilege of working for three NB, a teams. Now the San AntonioSpurs the Cleveland Cavaliers and now the Houston Rockets. We talk about whatit's like working for: Three Powerhouse Teams in the NBA interviewing big nameslike Russell Westbrookan, James Harden and cohed Papavitch, and so many othersHaley had an unfortunate setback early in her career that she talks about, andwe also get into whether or not basketball will be played again. Thisseason Paly offers great insight into life as a reporter in the NBA, thecamaraderie between other females around the league and her relationshipwith her mentor. Doris Burke without further ADO. Here is my conversationwith Kale Griffin, Hi Caley. How are you o? I am very wellI'v Bean trying to stay busy here in quaranting. How are you I'm good? I'mdoing the same. I feel like that's how all conversations start these days,how's your florintin going. Oh Mine's, fine, ows, yours Te. When I talk to, I know everyonesays the same thing. I think the most importan thing that I found is try tofind a routine, which is hard when all the days seem to blend together, buttrying to get up at a certain time and get a workout and to start my day and aleast feel like I'm doing something. Productive has helped me pass the timea little bit better, but I'm getting a little bit ancy. I can't lie yeah. Ithink a lot of us are feeling ansy and I, like your schedule, idea. I've triedand then some days, I'm like I'm going to let myself be lazy today, becausewho knows how long this is going to last? For so it's a balance of beingproductive and letting yourself be lazy, at least for me. So I totally it's beenmore than fifty days since the NBA suspended play Du Tocobinineteen, whichis so crazy to even say that number out loud, you went from traveling at toneduring the season covering games almost every night too, now being home forthis shelter and place order. You said you're getting anse what dis theadjustment been like for you to just not have any games to cover. It'sactually kind of been a breath of fresh air right now, just because we were inthe middle of such a crazy time. I mean the day befor the season was suspended.We had just been on a three game and four day stretch, including being onewas back to back. We were on the road, then had to fly home, and then weplayed again and day later, so it was insane. So it's almost been nice, but Ithink we're all kind of getting to the point where okay, we want to get backto work, this wis a nice little break, but it's it was weird to be in themiddle of a season seeing that month and a half stretch or so weeding up tothe playoffs ahead of us and now wondering when we will return to thecourt. So I know everyone. I've talked to kind of either around theorganization, my crew with the rockets, as well as other reporters out there,that I've been in contact with everyone's kind of getting to thatpoint. Like you know, we, it was nice...

...for a couple of days and now we'rewe're, definitely getting to the point where we miss work and we're excitedfor what it does come back yeah, hopefully sooner rather than later. Ifeel like that's all we say whenever I have any conversation with anyone insports. Everyone's like fingers, crossed just waiting for to start backup again 'cause. Everyone is more than ready. I Wan to dive right in. I feellike there's so much to talk about with you. First of all, Cayley. I think youare an absolute rock star. I am so happy that you've found success. Truly,not everyone t that has a dream to be in broadcasting, gets to work in thespecific sport that they love the most and it seems like. Basketball has beensuch a huge part of your life for so long yeah, you're, absolutely right,basketball is the sport. I grew up around my mom actually playedbasketball, provivince college. Where I attended school. My sister playeddivision through basketball. I was in the middle of deciding if I was goingto continue my basketball career, but I I'd played since I was eight years oldthrough high school played on the egg. you start it going across the countryplayingplaying all the time the summer an, and it just came to a point where Ihad to decide what I wanted to do and I mentally prepared that I was justwanted to go to school. I waned. I know this was a career I wanted to pursueafter doing some internships even in high school, and made the decision tojust a ten school as a regular student, and I I went to providence and was veryinvolved in theire in arural program and still played sports and and was ahuge fire basketball fan still IAM but um. I knew that I wanted sports to be partof my life and if I could make basketball part of my life, that wassomething I really wanted to do as well. So I feel very fortunate. I now andyou're four in the N Ba and it's kind of a surreal dream that I'm in beingable to pursue a career covering the sport thatI love the most and Um it's sport that I grew up loving. It's the sport that Istill love and it's one of those things where you walk into arena and it'salmost hard to believe. Sometimes I still walk it and I'm like Ob. This ismy job. This is so cool. I get to just talk about basketball. Today I get towatch some of the best players in the world play on a nightly basis. This iscrazy. I'm glad that you still have those moments, you don't let it get toobig, which is good. Let's run through your resume just a little bit. What wasyour first job out of college, so my first job out of college was actually Iwas working at a live stream, digital production assistant at n BC, sports,and that was not right out of college. I A graduated from providence and I hada TI internships at school and I felt really good about where I was, but Icouldn't get a job anywhere to save my life. I tried everything and nothingwas working and then ID intered at NB C for two summers and they've reached outto me randomly the summer after I graduate and Mo and said they had thispart time position, so I would be going into the n BC sports office in StamfordConneo, where I'm actually from I was living at home, and I have to go in atfour m because I was doing premierleague soccer. So I was watchingthe Games a and cutting and dropping commercials when I needed to- and itwasn't the most ideal situation, but I got into n BC sports and I felt goodabout that. I had that on my bresime and I was making connections and aroundthat same time I saw that the biggest conference was launching a digialnetwork and proviince is in the big east and I was like o you know. Maybe Ishould just kind of reach out to them. So, on a whim, I set my resume and yreel to the director of Digital Ot, the conference and said Hey. My name isCaly. I just graduated from Providence. Here's my real her side resume. I sawyou're waunching the digital network. I don't know what you have planned for it,but I would love to be involved or to help out at all. If I could and to mysurprise, he answered within the next day and was like yeah, you know wedon't really know what we're doing with it. Quite yet, but we'd love to have mecome in and Shat and I didn't. Of course I had the most grandyost ideas,just above and beyond anything. They could ever do starting a a digitalnetwork, but they were like we really like you and we would love re to helpout, and so they hired me on a very, very part, time pay basis, but I wouldcome in and I would edit a lot of their digital content and they allowed me todo more on camera stuff, and I was there for two years and I ended upbeing Um and the position just kindof took off. It grew itself. I was doing alot more on camera. They allowed me to cover all of the the bigy sports frombasketball to lacross swimming and diving track and field soccer. I wasdoing everything which is great for me, especially right out of college, andthen they let us work the championships too, which were on the the Fox network.So it was a great experience Um, but it was kind of just the right, tining and using connectionsand reaching out on a whim that allowed me to somewhat create this role, whichthey still have. They have um pretty young people there. Still that are, arenew out of college, but they have built these correspondent positions, and I'mexcited that I played a roll in helping...

...build that and helping these up andcoming broadcasters pursue their career with the big east. I love that story. Ialso love that you just reached out on a whim, because I think that if we'renot open, minded and we're like oh well, there aren't any jobs available on thewebsite then like. If that happened to you, you would have just stopped rightthere and you would have moved on. You would have never reached out M and hadthe courage to just say hey here. I am like. Let me know if I can help. Ithink that that speaks a lot to you are as a person and also helps you insituations with your current role when you're interviewing players, you sortof have this bravery that maybe other people wouldn't have to ask specificquestions, because there is a chance that someone isn't going to answer yourquestion. They're gonna, you know in that case with the Big East Um networkm. He could have said no, but you you never would have known ifyou wouldn't have reached out and I dnothat it's turned into a really coolprogram. That's like that's your legacy, that's so cool! I know I love it. It'sso fun to see, and I encourage students that are, you know just getting set tograduate to just reach out, and I I said what is the harm in doing it? Theworst they can say is now D and if they say no, then okay, that's no and we'veall had hundreds of them in this industry. So it's ot might be knockeddown a few pegs, but then it gives you the strain to go and ask again- and Ithink in this industry too, a lot of the positions are' necessarily postedonline, so it doesn't hurt to just reach out. Maybe you make a connectionthere's so many other things you can do by just reaching out that you might noteven expect so it doesn't hurt to at least try absolutely I mean most of thejobs. I've goten in this industry weren't from applying online. They werebecause downhound me on Lington or I had a connection somewhere, and theyput me in touch with so and so um, so don't limit yourself to just lookingonline. Absolutely so. You've now covered the Spurs, the cavaliers nowyou're with the rockets. Those are three powerhouse teams in the NA. Theyall have big names and big personalities. I mean I could just runthrough all of those rosters. How Hav you managed to not let that go to yourhead and really just focus on covering the game that you love. I think that a lot of people don't necessarily knowor understand what goes into our roles as reporters and um all of the background that it takes sowhen I was hiring in San Antonio as hired as ha digital reporter, so Iwasn't ot any broadcast or anything an the focus around. That organization wasmostly what the organization was doing and not necessarily the team, and whileI was there, I continued to you know, push and prod a little bit, and I mademy way onto the broadcast in my second season, but it took a little time andit it took building the trust internally with my people on thebusiness side with the front office, with the players themselves, showing upshowing my face up practice every day, even if I didn't necessarily need to bethere, but knowing that I was with the team and that I was going to be thereconsistently. And while I was there too, I I expanded my role by taking on the aproducer position and it's helped me tremendously being able to edit all ofmy own content and a lot of the Times there. I was a producer on justfeatures and I wasn't even involved in, and that was really cool and a hugehelp for me and a huge advantage as I' moved forward in my career, but it is so fun to to build thoserelationships. You know now that I'm even in Houston, when we play the spursor the ro or the cab, seeing the the familiar faces, I had pattymills fromthe spurs a we were in Houston. He it's going through warmup and he's lookingat me and he's just like thit's just is 't right. This is a PRI. I can't acceptthis. It's just Houy an and you you J,because of the role that you have you're working with the team, as youhave done in the past with the Rangers, you built a different sort ofrelationship because there's a trust there that they know that yourintention is to build their brand and to make them look good, and I reallyhave embraced that, and I've really enjoyed that about my roles with theseteams as building solid relationships with the players, because I think thathelps you in the long run, no matter where you go. If I stay in the M B, anhopefully I will for a long time, I'm geting to know these players and themhaving a comfort with you, because you know they don't always stay on the sameteam. I've had the chance to see guys bounce around and then I see them cometo Arvrenas with different teams and it's always fun to reunite so Um. Ithink there's a lot of different aspects that go into the position itself and that peopledon't see- and I think that that has just kind of made me who I am and Umand how I've continued to grow. Yeah. It's a really cool experience to get afront Roa seat to who these players...

...really are get to know them on apersonal level, and at least for me my main goal when I worked for the Rangerswas really just helping fans learn that they're. Just people too. I feel likefans, have this view, not everyone. I shouldn't put them in a box, but thereare a lot of fans that just idolize these players and think that they arethese aliens. And yes, they are suber super talented, but they are justpeople too, and I think that's a really important job for you being in thatRorld to bridge that gap between the fans and the players. Absolutely- and Ilove that about our positions, it's fun, and I think, though, the onethat jumps out at me this season at least, has been Russell Westbroke inhis first year in Houston, and he has this mean demeanor one plays, and hekind of has that Um role and view by the media that he justplays angry and he's this angry guy and, of course, my first broadcast with therockets Ho season. I've been in town for maybe four days and my first walkup. Inverview is Russell Westbrook and I'm plinting I on Nerveoh Mywhat. Is hegoing to say? What's she going to bee like I've? No idea what to expect andhe comes over to be and he shakes Mi Han Hes, like I don't think we've beenintroduced. Formerly yet my name was Brussell as if I did know who all rightright, Arr so nice to me, ane. I am familiar with you ith, my dad andI'most. So great and we've been able to build this just great relationship interms of how we communicate, and I think it shows in our post, gaveinterviews t at I try to bring out a lighter side in him and, and he is sucha great genuine person, he loves his family he's. So not the person that yousee on the court. It's like in flips a switch, and I and that's really is whatI enjoy most about. Our job is bringing this personality of these players tothe fans and letting them see who they are off the Corp, because, obviously, when they take the cort andthey're in their competitive zone, they're a different person, they wantto win at all costs, but when they're off the cort, they are just normalpeople like the rest of us. Oh absolutely, you Um, you just remindedme of something I I just. I love the Um preinterview conversations that you cansometimes have with a player like normally it's you know, coming off of awin or something or you're joking around or whatever, and then I've hadtimes where th the cameras, which is on and they're so serious and they justthey're so strict in their answers and the camera turns off and they're jokingagain and they leave and I'm like. But where was that? I'm like I'm, trying to show the fanshow awesome and funny and bubble you can be B y. You know you turn on aspecific for SONA for the CAMPRA, it's funny, because I think it's just likewhen they see the red light they freeze up and they're like we have to say this,and we have to say that we want to sound like this, but it's not what wewant at all. We won't just genuine personality, and you just want you toanswer honestly, but I think some of the guys at least I've noticed thatI've actually noticed a lot with the younger players. I like laster inCleveland. They are thinking so much of what they need to say. They're like gotto make sure. I say it like this and say like this, that it doesn't soundnatural at all their er step and, like you said, the camera goes off and thenall of Asudden they're, just chanting with you and I'm like Yeahki, know it'sUm. It's it's just a mental thing and I guess it comes naturally for for peoplelike you and me where we speak on camera, so the red light like Yeah S. Idefinitely makes us nervous, but it doesn't impact us like it does forother people. So I always tried to remind myself of that, but Um. It wasalways funny to me when they wouldt turn a switch on and Durin Jom. I totalagre in telling that story aboutRussell Westbrook. Have there been other players that you've you've gottento know throughout your career, but you feel like they might be misunderstood. There is one player that immediatelywhen it comes to my mind, is lamarcus Aldridge I work within for two years inSan Antonio. He is there stare right now he is there. Go to player my lastseason, there, ky Leonard, was injured mysteriously for most of the year andthe spotlight was on lemarcus and he just shined all year long, but he has ahard time with the media, and I think we see it more and more wherejust some players are just uncomfortable and they don't like totalk and misunderstood is exactly how Limarcusolders describes himself. I I think she was on a podcast honestly and was askedto describe himself in one word and he said misunderstood and H. People thinkthat he's kind of a jerk just because he doesn't like to talk but from beingaround him so much I could genuinely realize he just doesn't like to talk e.that's just how he is he's a very nice...

...person. You just have to read him andread the situation and once you're round him eough, you can kind of belike okay. I can see that we can poke a little more today, but then there areother times where you're like all right he's, just not feeling it today. Sowe're just not GOINGTA we're not going to go there. So my second season in SanAntonio, we went to all start within with him and we didn't have a ton of access normallywith the Spurs, but they let us follow Lemarcus all weekend along and it was areally awesome time. We were in l a he had a ton of event and we were doingthis event with Leeve eyes and we just kind of afterwards always wanted to.You know just grab him for a few seconds. Have Him talk about the event?He was just at what it means him to be at Ulsterwekand whatever, and he wasdesigning denam jackets and we was us and our PR staff and we Ijust stayed in the corner. I was like N, I'm not going to get. This is hisweekend, we're just kind of stay away. We don't want him to feel like we'reall over and he's LE. He calls me over nd he's like hayly. Come on Youe got tomake one with me like he, and he had all of us that were there, he hadhe paid for Leevis to make us all these custom old, star, weekand, Danm jacketsand he's such a genuinely nice person andsuch a great guy, but because of just his sometimes discomfort with talkingto the media. People write him off as rude and he's not like that at all, andI think we are in the unique position as having been reporters covering a teamwhere we get to know these players little differently, because we spend somuch time around them, whether we're on flights with them or we're just buminginto each other in the lobby of the hotel. What have you that we get to seethem outside of just the working situation and getting to know thembetter? In that sense, we see who they are as people both on and off the court,and so l, Marcis auted is fort sure. One hundred percent the person thatcomes to mind to me, wh N, when I hear misunderstood, because that's exactlywhat he is he's such a great guy. I'm so happy that I got to work with him.He was one of the he reached out to me when I actually lost my job in SanAntonio, so it was lso, sweet, so kind. U, so he is one of the best. That's agreat story. I love that. What's been the biggest difference for you coveringeach of these teams and have there been lessons that you've taken with you fromteam to team? Obviously you know it s, it's the same sport, but there theremust be differences between teams right, I think that's the biggest takeaway forme. Is it's so interesting to see how each organization that I work for runsand they're so different. When I was in San Antonio Tim Duncan had just retiredit was still monogenobly and Tony Parker, and so they were still in themiddle of this kind of big three evolution that they had. This big threesituation and Mano and Tony were starting to make their way out, butthey were. They had never really needed to push the media attention becausethey had had it for so long. They had one a championship still in twent yfourteen and theyre very old school, and it was tough for me because theydidn't necessarily see the importance at the time of needing to push digitalmedia and push access. And it's funny now Tony's Gone Manu's gone and you seethem the flexibility of there and people that my friends thave still work.There talk about how that, from the organization standpoint, they've reallystarted to allow more access because they've realized. This is a new teamthat they have now. They don't have those guys anymore and they have to bemore open to this new digital age and and giving that access. So at that timeit was difficult for me just because they were very closed off, but that'sjust how the spurs were. Everyone knew that the spurs were really tough and T.I went to Cleveland and it was the year after Labran left, so they were in acomplete rebuilled stage and I had so much access that I couldn't get over itand I don't necessarily know that it was different access than a team usuallywould give, but just because I had come from an organization that essentiallygave the most minimal access ever I had now. I could just theyere like you, canjust go talk to any player once practics and go just go right up tothem. I couldn't ro my head around it. I was Han and talk to a guy and just talking likeyeah, you work for us you're part of Thi team too, and it was that was soeyeopening to me Um and then, when I came to Houston, even when I Iinterviewed here, I I kindo gave that story of how I went from oneorganization to another that were so very different in how they ran theiroperations around the team and US as broadcasters, and they were likethat'spthere's, probably a middle ground that we're at so for me here inHouston. It's it's definitely not. As...

...strict as the spurs were as it's not asI don't have as much access as I did with the cows, but there is a middleground there and I get. I get a decent amount of access and, of course, beingwith the team and being with the team's partner from t e network stamp way M. Ibecome a priority, which is very helpful, but it is interesting. I thinkthat is that's been the biggest eye. Opener for me is just how they operate. It is so amazing thatin this thirty team, Leagu that all of these teams operate so differently yeah,I kind of experienced something similar to once, and I only worked for one teamin the NHL, but once you meet a lot of people from other teams, you start totalk to them. How do you do this? This is how we do this, and- and it reallyis an organization by organization situation- it it's not the same, and myexperience in working for an original Sixh team, it was Vthey, were verytraditional. There were lots of things that I could not do, but at the sametime I I did have a lot of freedom so M. I always justlike to ask that question because it's it's interesting to hear how differentteams do it and there's no there's no right or wrong way. Every you knowevery team has their own way of doing it and that's just the way it goes.What is one part of your job that people might think is glamorous, butit's really not probably there's probably a mix betweentraveling and getting ready Games. I lway Ti b back what you would sa people think that someone sthew in myhair, your young Bak, I like to AIA lugging around a make: U Bag? I've gotmy curler and my backpacks, or just in case my hair starts to go straight Ofar,the DA I in a bathroom, I'm in upon e Ather, I'm trying to curl my hair andlike with bans walking in and out being like. Who is this crazy, leter SinOrown andthen the travel standpoint. I dotravel with the team on a team plane which is very helpful, but I don'tthink people take into consideration the crazy hours that we fly. We weveusually right after the game, so we're not getting to the next city till Godknows what time in the morning we had this year we were actually in SanAntonio. We went. We had a double overtime game, of course, and we wereflying from San Antonio to Toronto. That night and we didn't leave SanAntonio Til. Probably One am we os to the hotel at seven? Am My God Er? I wasgetting my family group chat being like Oo Morning I'll be everyone has a goodday. I'm like I just got to theoi'm going to sleep, so I think people don'tnecessarily realize you know we traveling is cool. I I really do loveit. It's my first time full traveling, every game, all season long and I'vereally enjoyed it, but it is a LO. It's a lot wer. I barely unpackd my bagbecause I'm gone at least once a week, for God knows how many days it's it's acommitment for sure, but it's it's certainly not glamorous. Flying on theteam. Plane is nice, but knowing how much travelling we're doing in thecrazy hours we're getting into the next city or we're getting home, and then wehave to get into our car and drive home. It's it's a huge process, Oh yeah, I'mpretty sure in season. I always had my suitcase on my floor, like I just neverput it away like it's. Always there you're unpacking and repacking, and I'msure it's been weird for you to not have to pack and repack pace for thelast. However long it's been it's so funny, because we had like a week afterwhen we this legue ast suspended, we were supposed to go on a two week, roadtrip. So I was. I had toaain like, Oh, my goodness, we're going to the Midwestwe're going to east coast, I'm going to have to bring layers and all of thisstuff, and I'm like Aue y God, Ol Hane to do anything. Likethatyeahyou E to dolaundry- I I I was saying o somebody th other day like this is the longest timeby far that I've been in my apartment ever yeah it's so it's strange ND, likemy electric bill, went up. I actually got N Aler on Y credic hard. Last month,the like your N Electric Bill. It's gone up. Fifty eight percent from thelast month, like t' 'cause, I'm actually here, yeah 'cause you're.Actually there I used to joke when I lived in New York that, like Icouldhave, lived in Tim Book too, and it wouldn't even matter 'cause you're,just always on a plane. You know you you shouldn't even have to pay rent.You should be exempt because you're just never there. You should. I totallyagree. I have to ask you about your outfits. Caly, I'm not kidding. I usedto get so excited, seeing your game photos from the sidelines, 'causeseriously, they're, always so awesome. So I'm curious. I just want to know howyou plan and where you shop, as we just talk to, I eas know what it's like pack,Nice Clothes and plan for a gazillion...

...days on the road. What is your strategy,one that is like the biggest calle whatever so ho? We thank you. I it'sfunny, because I always loved fashion and stuff like that, but I went to aprivate high school, and so I was in a uniform and that in college I I swear.I lived inwat pants, AF legging, so I never really took it seriously untilafter I graduated, but now I'm always theking out F thing Zars my favoritestore. I could live in Zara, but just this year, actually I started usingrent the runway and it has changed my life yeah. It's truly changed my life.I don't know how I did it before. I had previously bought everything and it'sreally hard because you wan to try to notrepet out ten it's if eighty tworegular season games is s so difficult and I started using rent the runwaythis year and it's amazing and of course now it's funny because I seeI'll see tons of reporters are using it now and you see some things that you'veseen onone or maybe you were thinking about prenting and stuff like that, but it has been a a life saving just revelation that I'm not but foundit. It's amazing. We D, I do the monthly, so you pay one price a monthand you get four things and you can switch t'em out, and maybe you want tokeep another thing for a little longer. You can send two back one back whateveryou want. You can pick the next thing that comes so m strategically in theseason. If I know I have a long trip I'll try to save and get four of themfor that, but then I do have a lot of basic stuff. I love Black Halo, its oneof my favorite dress. Brands. Tey have some great jump suits and I strugglebecause I am sixty tall, so I need a lot of long things and it's really hardto find things that are long enough. It's funny too, I feel like I haddresses that I wore a few years ago that now I put on I'm like mabt a little bit too short orsomething I I feel like just as you get a little bit older, not that it wasever inappropriate, but you look at it differently and Otal get a littleolderya. So I try to keep. I have like a couple of black dress staples in mycloset and I I um still I'm obsessed with Zarr. I go there too much. I hateto admit how much I spend IGARA I' like to be able to have a few things to that.I'm like okay, this this is mine. I own Thiss, I'm going to wear this and I'mtrying to get my mm, my mom hates that I have so much black she's like color.You need more color, so I'm actively trying to have more color F. my life, Ideelike planning outfits is another thing that fits into the no glamorouscategory, because even though it sounds fun and it looks amazing when you showup to work and everything's put together doing the rentals 'cause, Idid the same thing Um and I even have recently Um it's stressful because youhave to play in a head. You have to ship it back and you have to make surethat you get your next shipmen in in time before you hit the road or beforeyou have another game like it is another added stress that I feel likesome people, just don't even realize. I totally agree, I'm like I so before myI live in a relatively new building here in Houston and they didn't haveany. I had to go to the Front des to ask. If I had package I've been goingdown there like three times a day asked I frent Ese Lik di o a I got ETA telike Taley. No, like they know me my first Tinik Tali. We don't have it I'MD,like okay ut. I want to leave like in two hours. I rein the stress like please, and then you 're thinkingabout the city you're, going to what the weather is going to look like sothat week before I have all the cities plugged into my weather APP to bechecking. Okay, we're going to be here Wednesday, Thursday that we're going tobe in thes city Friday, through Sunday and you're, trying to plan that it is. It's definitely an added stressfor sure it is. It's like a whole separate job just to plan outfits,which sounds so ridiculous and materialistic. But truly it's it's partof the job and it's a lot of work. It really is Um, there's no right way toseg way into this, but I want to talk a little bit about adversity. Nothing inlife comes easy, especially working in sports and any capacity most of us facesetbacks at some point in our career. When I was laid off from Yahosports acouple of months ago, you reached out to encourage me, which was really nice,and I really appreciated that, and you also shared your own story of dealingwith a set back yourself. So I would love if you could share. Are youcomfortable with sharing yeah? Absolutely I actually so I mention itbriefly in the beginning of this talking about Lemarcosolderge, but I'dbeen in San Antonio for two years and it's funny because the season ID endedand it was probably a month after the season ended. I was in the middle of afew projects and I had been I it was a late. It was, Iremember, like it was yesteray. Actually it was late. On a Thursday Iwas in meeting with our PR staff getting ready for the draft and my boss suddenly called me in and hadme come upstairs, and they just told me that they were making cuts and that mymy role was being dissolved altogether...

...and it was so shocking. I mean I had noheads up nothing and, and it's hard to wrap your head around when you're inthe situation and Um. They said there was nothing that I did.They absolutely loved me there and to this day I still have great friends andgreat connections at the Spurs, Um, no bad blood. Of course, at the beginningI was just so shocked upset but M. we've we've moved past that weave greatrelat. I have great relationships there, but it was shocking and I had picked upand moved my life from Connecticut and I was working in New York to SanAntonio, so you have that Mon were like okay. Well, what do I do now? I don'tthere's in San Antonio I mean the spurs is really it. They have their MINORLEYACockatin, but they're all owned by the spur spur sports, NT entertainment. Sofor me I was like okay, there's really nothing else for me to be doing here,and I remember calling my parents crying after that and being like. Ijust I can't believe I don't know what to do and they're great well you'regoing to come home and that day literally I just drove home, and I wentright to my leasing office and T was like I'm breaking my lease and within the next few weeks I just packedup everything with my dad and we drove from San Antonio back to Connecticutand for me it was just I'm from stampor. There's a lot in Stamford and you'reclose to New York, you ave, close proximity to Boston or Philly D C, justa lot more around, and so for me. I was like no. I had a better opportunity tointerview to meet people just to reconnect with with people and Um. Itwas hard. It was really tough. It was you enjoy it for a little bit becauseyou have all this freedom and free time and but then you're like okay, I m I'mancy, I'm anxious I wan to be working again. I picked up a few freelance gigsand I auditioned for a wop and nothing was coming together and it was just. Itwas a tough six months. It was about six months, yeah and Um. You know Ihave a very supportive family and I'm so thankful for them and they havehelpyacross the country too many times now, but they know my passion for myjob and how much I love it and how much I put into this career and they were sosupportive of me and what I needed to do and it was big help to have thatfoundation. I think it's so important to have people that support you whenyou're going through something like this, but I tant sugar coated and say it was. Itwas an easy time for me. I was really Ha. I was at a low point. I reallydidn't know what I was going to do. I was trying to consider all options. Isthis the right field for me? Is this something that I want to pursue, and Igot very fortunate that probably at the end of September I was able to auditionfor the the calves and then atwo weeks later I found out they were going tocreate this new roll for me and jumped back into it, but it was. It wasa really tough time and so an any time I hear that someone is going throughsomething similar. I I try to reach out and share my story, because I wastwenty five still so young in this industry filing for unemployment andgetting unemployment checks. It was such a surreal thing to take in and Umit's an unfortunate reality. I think of this industry in particular. Is thatjust the way this things move and the way things trend towards digital? Orwhat have you things are constantly changing and unfortunately, sometimes we are theones that have to face that. So it was, it was difficult. I think it helped. meM become a stronger person, but I I can't say that it was easy yeah, especially because when you're soyoung and you get an opportunity like that you're so excited you know whatyou have to offer. You know that you're you're capable you're willing to putall put all this work in and then it just gets taken away from you um so easily. It feels and it's it can be.Very discouraging sports is one of those industries where you have to giveeverything to be in it and then it can just drop you on your head outof nowhere and you're. Just like what I like everything like you, you know youmoved across the country and and then that's what happened and it's tough. SoI'm glad that you didn't give up, because I feel like a lot of people inthat situation, especially six months. It might not sound like a long time,but six months is a long time to be unemployed, especially in your midtwenties, when you should be like on your way to where you want to go andyou're working as hard as you possibly could, because you're young and um it'sjust it's it's a supervulnerable time to have what seemed like everything at thetime Um. It was just taken away from you, butI'm I'm glad that you mentioned that it made you stronger, because there havebeen times too in my career, where I've looked back and I've been like. Oh I'm,so glad I didn't get that job 'cause. I...

...got this one instead and I'm very gladthat that's where I ended up and I'm in an interesting season as well or I'mcurrently unemployed, and that's never happened to me, and so I'm I'm also waiting for theokay that door closed and now the next one's going to open m. So I think thatit is important for us to like to remember that everything happens for areason as cheesy as it sounds. It is very true. No! I A hundred percentagreen. I think you hit the nail on the head like six months when you say itdoesn't sound like that one, but when you're going through it, it feels likean eternity and as you mention when you're in the sports world inparticular, you give up so much. You are committed you're, giving up holidays you're, giving up events with your Fam Youl, give up your weekends, yournight, everything you just commit all of it h for an extended period of timeand to have it all taken away like that is crazy. But I I do encourage people,and I have to remind myself a lot to do this is to just sometimes you know youget caught up in the whirlwind of everything, and why isn't thishappening fast enough and I feel like I should have this job? Whyisn't this happening for me? Just take a second and pause and reflect on whereyou are what you've done up to this and how you've gone to this point, becauseI am the biggest culprit of that. I have done it for the last few yearsleading up to this job. I just have been in this big rush. A and I'm justlikejust. Take this second and look at what you've done y. You startat the big bast you covered the national championship Villainovateamthen you went to the spurs and you covered that team going to the n BaWestern conferce finals, and it's it's hard when you're in the moment to,I think, appreciate it, but once you're out of it for a little bit, you cantake a step back and how I I at the time I was like I'm twenty five andlook at all this stuff that I've done a it's unfortunate that sometimes ittakes you a second because you're in e situation like that to appreciate that.But I try to encourage especially young broadcasters, who are just getting intothe setter, almost inevitably going to feel moments of frustration to thinkabout everything that they've accomplished up until this point, oneof the best pieces of advice that I've gotten actually recently from one of mypodcast guests, was to try to not live and die by the nose, and even thoughthis wasn't technically a no it's in the form of a no Um and it's it's true'cause in this business, like our livelihood, is based upon the yeses. Wejust no one, yes and that's where we go and that's what our life becomes. It'sthe nose that hurt the most because we build this up in our head. This is ourdream. We want to live our dream and we're doing it and it's taken away oror not given the chance, but we know we can and you just have to keep chuggingalong and it's scary. Because no one knows you know you, don't you don'tknow that that you were then going to get a job with the cavaliers and theneventually g go and move to Houston. Like you didn't know, any of that wasgoing to happen. You were just hoping that you know someone would give you achance to do what you love again. So I'm glad that you bounced back I'm gladThatto Shining Your light for everyone to see n the MBA. I'm really happy thateverything turned around for you. Oh thank you. I appreciate it. It wasnitthe easiest road, but I can say that I'm very happy now and now honestly,this sounds easy to you're more relatable now, because it's really hardto relate to people that have never gone through any sort of adversity,everything's been rainbows and butterflies, Um, whether that's yourelading to players or other fans, or just people in general, and that's real.That's that's real life, so Um speaking of something that's not Super Fun. UmBasketball, obviously is not happening at all right now, which we know therehave been some rumors circulating about the remainder of the season.Potentially getting canceled therehave been some players that have spoken out,including the Bron James. They obviously don't want this to happen. Ithink I know your answer to this, but at this point, what do you hope happens? I hope we play basketball again. I do Imean I, I think we're all craving it. We all want something to look for justseeing the WMBO drap and the NFL draft and how the viewership was of all thosethe last sdance documentary I mean people are just wanting some sort ofsports content and it's funny because I don't think a lot of people realize howmuch their lives revolve around sports until this all happened Y, AH, not onlyus as broadcasters or people that work in it, but just fans in general they'rethey're in this weird space where they don't have sports around. So I wouldlove to see it come back. Of course. The most important thing is making surethat everyone, the country the world, is safe and healthing. We've enoughtesting for everybody. Before we get...

...back because the N B, a players we'renot, we can't put them above the rest of the population of this country, so Ihope it comes back. I'm hopeful that it comes back. I've got my woesnotification, an ETIFICATION smarkstine everybody in the N B, a world all theirnotifications, constantly of waiting for that one twee to get an update ofone. We can expect things to start ramping up, but I think just the mostimportant thing is staying safe and some practce facilities are starting toopen up this week in the states that are starting to ease up somerestriction. It'll be interesting to see how that process hall goes, and Ithink that's probably where the league will tend to lean on as seeing how thisslow reopening of facilities for guys to get individual workouts. How thatworks out, and then maybe we'll we'll see some more updates, but again justmaking sure that everyone is staying. Safe and healthy is most important.Absolutely and I do wonder how other Um proleagues will follow suit, because itwas a trickle effect when all of this happened in the first place, obviously, with an M B, a player being the firstto contract it, you know, then the NHL canceled everything and we know therest, so I'm hoping that maybe the N B a will also set the tone, for you knowreopening and playing again. So I am trying tosay positive, especially since they are opening practice facilities up verysoon. So hopefully that means that games will be played soon. But, as yousaid, safety and Health Um is is very important, so we will see what happensby traveling with so many different teams you've met, and this is only fromwhat I've seen on social media, but YOUV met some really awesome women inthis industry. I know that that was something that I loved as welltraveling with a professional team. What have you experienced in meetingother females in terms of the Camaraderie and the sisterhood thatexists in working in sports? I think you just took the words out of my mouthby sank. Sisterhood and I I can only speak to the N B, a sisterhood, but I Ibelieve that it happens in other leagues. I know I work closely with ourATER reporter down here in Houston. She' said the same thing: They have agroup chat, but the women are just so supportive and they want to see eachother succeed. I think there comes a time, and maybe it's the level of the position N,but we're understanding that we are all here representing women in the NBA atthis level and there's about twenty eight of us. Oh there's, twenty eightcilone reporters in the N B and not all of them are females. So there's evenless of us in that sense, but everyone just wants to see each other succeed. Iknow I talk to them before every game. Whoever were going up against. I seekout the sideline reporter. We all have great relationships with each other andwe share notes we're like well. Can We? How can we help each other? How what doyou need? What information are you looking for? Is there anything I canget for you and I think that's really cool, because they just genuinely wanteach other to do a good job and Um. I think that is a little bit of amisrepresentation in terms of how people view sometimes of women in a inan industry like this, and it certainly is a competitive industry, but just about every woman I've met in thisindustry just wants to see the other succeed and shine, and I've had theprivilege of meeting some of my closest friends through working in thisindustry. I worked very closely with the SILAND reporter in Cleveland lastyear, Angel Graand. She became one of my absolute best friends and it's sospecial to have those relationships and it's cool to be able to talk to themtoo about everything we're going through, because they can relate to thetrials and tribulations that were all experiencing traveling with the team.The commitment, the time, commitment, everything it's it's a relatabilitythat we have and an understanding of what goes into our jobs Um. It's veryspecial- and I see it around not only the NBA from the from the regionalnetwork standpoint that we work for, but also the women who work on thenational platforms they they've all been so amazing. They all want to helpout, and it's a very cool thing. I don't necessarily think that everyoneunderstands out or knows that. No, that's! That's! Truly theinspiration behind this pocast. I remember feeling that, and I'm like, Iwant other people to know that there is a real camaraderie that exists betweenfemales in this industry. I feel like people don't understand that that's anactual thing, like a lot of us, are friends, we're all rooting for eachother, whether we've met in real life or we just follow each other on socialmedia. It exists, and I really wanted people to know that it exists inmultiple fascets, not just broadcasters but m people in the Front Office umwhether they are high up as a CEO or the're, a social media person ormarketing or advertising, or someone...

...that works in pr or an athlete Orica.There are just so many females in sports and even though you don't knoweveryone, there is like this secret bond that I don't think should besecret anymore. So I have my final question for you and I think I mightknow the answer to this, but maybe not can you leave us with a woman in sportswho inspires you? It can be someone you worked with before or someone that youtry to emulate in your own work or never met whoever inspires you who's.The first person that comes to might, I feel, like you, do probably know whothis is 'cause. I don't make it it's not very quiet but of don keep thisquiet. Dorsburg is my mentor, my idol Um. She went toProvidence College as well, so it's I've known Dora since I was still atschool. It's a, I think. It's a unique bond in that providence has no sort ofcommunications program, nothing along those lines at all and there's a verysmall group of people that come out of that school and try to pursue that kindof field, and she is, I mean pretty much when you think of women, an sports.She is what most people consider the gold standard. She is just one of thebest when you meet her. She is just one of the most genuine down to earth.Normal people wants to just get to know you want to grab a glass of wine, havea conversation. She is just so relatable on so many levels,but then, when she gets to work, she is one of the best at the position. Maleor female she's been doing it forever. She is an inspiration I feel like to somany, and she just she just does such a great job, and I feel so lucky to haveher as someone that I can reach out to by text now checked in on her a coupleF weeks ago. She came out by saying that she was positive for the COBAnineteen. A just sent her a text to see how she was feeling, and she was great,just saying feeling a lot better. It's been a crazy road, but sheis glad thatshe was able to donate her plasma, which is amazing and m. Now I know I'mnot alone and in thinking she's one of the best. I know at least in the NB, arelm that most of the women I work with on a day to day basis and around theleague aspire to be like Dorason the relationships she has across the Leagueuh from Organizations Front Office to the players. Shes just has she just oos resp O was his respectfrom everybody, and it's it's pretty incredible to see that, and I'm justvery grateful for our friendship. There is no one like Doris, that's for sure,and I'm I'm so glad that you mentiond that she's feeling better. I wasthinking about her and I love that you guys have that providence connection. Idon't know why. I didn't know that, but that's amazing and that's so cool thatyou've found amentor in her, and I love that she is just as genuine as youwould hope. Someone in her position would be so that's amazing, Kaly. Thankyou so much for joining me. I really appreciate you sharing your story. Ihope that basketball comes back soon, so you can get busy again and we canwatch your work well. Thank you. I cannot wait forbasketball to return to get back to work and E man. I'm wishing you all thebest of luck. You are the best and things are all going to look out so many great stories from Cayley.There were so many times. I wanted to follow up to what she had to say, butfor the sake of time I didn't get to anyway. I hope you learned more aboutwhat it takes to travel and cover eighty two games a season with an NB, ateam and get I behind the scenes, glance into her life as a playerherself and how she's overcome adversity to make her dream a reality.Cayley is really fun to follow. On social media so check her out, if youdon't follow her already she's at Hali Griffin, oninstagram and entutter thatsC Ay, L E, I gh, as I said in the Intro, thank you for making this podcast apriority. This is a passion project of mine and I'm really enjoying gettingreal with so many Badass women. So thank you for coming along on thisjourney with me, because I'm doing this for free and putting my heart in soulinto it. I would really appreciate it if you subscribed and then rate andreview. So I know what you're learning and what you want. More of thanks forlistening.

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