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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 22 · 1 year ago

21. Niki Noto Palmer, TV Host & Reporter, Podcaster

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Her dream to be on a national stage came true, but it still didn't feel fulfilling. "When is enough, enough?" That's the question Niki Noto Palmer asked herself as she realized it was time to really look inward and decide on a shift. Growing up a boisterous child, she earned the "becoming a talk show host" superlative early on (in 4th grade to be exact). She took that and ran with it, covering everything from college basketball and football to hockey for ESPNthe ACC, the Atlanta FalconsFox Sports and more. She was living her dream of talking about sports on tv when she met her now-retired NFL player husband. When they started growing a family, Niki was faced with a decision she wasn't expecting. In this episode, we talk about whether being addicted to ambition is good or bad, and how you can still have a dream and choose to evolve.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes. Here's your host, Amanda Borgeous, Hello, welcome in. I hope you ere doingwell today, I'm pumped to share this episode with you. Nicky notopalmer issomeone that feels like an instant ally. When you talk to her, she has a load oflife experience working in sports broadcasting for multiple networks,leagues and teams like ESPN, the Atlana Falcons, the ACC Fox sports and moreshe's married to a retired N FL player. Yes, of course, we get into the storyof how they met. She has two gorgeous babies and she's reinventing her careerand spoiler. allerit looks a little different than she thought it wouldwhen she first started dreaming years ago. This chat with Nicky is very realand we dive into things like how ambition becomes addictive and whythat's not always a good thing. We talk about shifting priorities and how thatcan evolve over time. We get into her life as a Siland reporter and what shelearned about herself during that time and we discussed some new projects thatshe's working on, including a new potcast without further ado. Here is mychat with TV host reporter Podgaster and MC Nicki, notopalmer, Hey Niky. How are you I'm Great Amanda?How are you doing I'm good? Thank you so much for joining me. I'm reallyexcited to chat with you M. There's a lot. That's been going on for a lot ofus. You have a couple of projects in the Work Tho we're going to get to that,but I want to start by rewinding just a little bit um you've known that youwanted to talk about sports for a living. Since you were a kid which Ican also really do. Can you just tell us about that journey of discoveringyour purpose at a young age, sure it'. It's really unique right now, Amanda tobe a mom of young children, because, what's so interesting is now I have people telling Me Nicky whenyou were younger this is you talked all the time you never sat still. So thereare so many things when I that I how I was described when I wasyounger d that just has completely translated into adoldhood. Obviously,because that's just who I am so, I can take it back to even school childhood right I mean I never.I was very straight lace. coudhe two shoes, I you know was involved ineverything that I could get my hands on, and leadership rolls, but the only timeI ever got in trouble was for talking so thateen a TAT's alway, Ana Narrativeand my story, and I always loved telling the story. I was in fourthgrade and my fourth grade teacher. Oh my gosh shewas, she was so wonderful. Her daughter Actually Babysat me too growing up. SoI spent a lot of time with her, so she knew me pretty well and she would giveout her thing which she would give out superlatives. At the end of the yearand in fourth grade my best friend got most likely to be Miss America, and Iwas like oh my gosh. I want to be Miss America and then w she got to mine. Itwas most likely to host her own TV show, so it was really funny how a scene wasplanted in fourth grade, and I didn't really know it at the time. But again,when you look back on characteristics of your personality, there were so many similarities like Isaid that have just followed me into an old hood and talking and loving peopleand, of course, yeah loving, loving sports. It was this Trifecta that Iadopted early on and went with it. That's so funny, because fourth gradeis such a young age. where, typically like you have no idea, you don't evenknow what adulthood is like. You have no idea what your career options are.So for someone to like to label you as that and then you pursue that is, isreally munny yeah and you know it's really cool too, because now havingchildren, there are certain tendencies and my daughter specifically my sonsway too young, but there are certain tendencies of herpersonality where I'm already going okay, what is she going to be into?What is she drawn to and right now it's books and she's very creative like shelikes to sit down and draw and color, and so it's funny because you know somekids might gravitate towards balls or building things and tearing them apartand that's just not her. So it's interesting already now at three yearsold, you can kindof lean into that and and see what she's migrating to. So what was your first broadcasting job? So it's interesting because when I gotinto the broadcasting world so to speak,...

I went from I graduated from Alabamaand so my first well I I took an internship. Essentially the summer Iwas graduating for the Tennessee titans. I sil count that as my first job, I was in the immediate relationsdepartment and it was there in Tennessee, where I got a phone callfrom a previous professor of mine. She said, Hey, I know you're in Tennesseeright now, but there is an ESP n crew coming back to Alabama they're shootingthis show they need a production assistant. Would you be interestedbecause they need someone that has equity in the athletics department,and that knows campas and someone that is essentially just going to be areally great reflection of our our program as well, and I said e, let melook at the tihtand schedule and they happened to have an off or in a waygamethat week, so I wasn't needed and I was like actually, if the titens are awayso yeah, I can make that happen. I don't even remember if I got paidAmanda which narrative to in this business right andso I drove to Tescalusa- and I was a production assistant for this- showcalled Rotrit and they called me back. I guess two more games like for the SCChampionship and ultimately for the National Championship, which is bonkersthat I got to do that too. As a production assistant- and I remember Iflew back to Nashville after after those games and that justsolidified everything I mean, I already knew that's what I want it to do, butcoupling the experiences of media relations with the Tennessee Titans inaddition to production assistant and falling in love with the unscriptedformout of this show and the amazing interviews that we got to do. That'swhen I said. Okay, that's really what I want to do and I had already had aninternship in college at a local new station and I cid you not. I spent oneday in the news department and I looked at my intern director and I said I'm sosorry that, with all due respect, I have to go into that sports departmentand then I never looked back and then the first day on the job. So to speakof my internship, I interview Bobby Boud on the golf course and I neverlooked back so your first day. You got to interview Bobby Boutin Yeah, I meanit's, that's what I'm saying and as as a Knoll, I'm sure you're like. Are youkidding me? So he has Birmingham ties right andthat's where I was and it was the coolest and he was. I willnever forget that day. In that conversation, his kindness isencouragement for me to keep going and then sure enough after my time what thetitens ended. Then I went to the Atlanta Falcons, so my TV job started. It was a little mix of media relationsand then they gradually started adding in team reporters, because I was thefirst team reporter for the Atlanta Falcon, so that was back intwo thousand ten. So I still consider that thatmorphine of the titans and the Falcons and B and simultaneously being a PA forthis show, as my first experience well and what a cool thing to start behindthe scenes, and I love giving that advice to people than ask you know howdo I start in sports? What shoall I do, starting as a production system, is sohelpful, because not only do you learn the INS and outs of of a set andplanning and and there's just so much that goes into it. So then, once you doget that opportunity to be on camera. Not only do you appreciate those Paseven more, but you understand everything that goes into it absolutelyand you under you. You understand every aspect of the crew right and I thinkthat's something really important, and I mean- and I know you get this becauseyou edit your own potcast, you know that's actingoly. One of my favoriteparts is to be a creative producer and to bring something to life, and I justthink there's there's so much beauty in being a part of the idiation toexecution, and so much of that comes from behind the scenes as well. Yeah.Absolutely I think now, at least for me as I've gotten older. I appreciate thebehind the scenes more and actually want to be more part of it than I didbefore. I think it's hard when you are in front of the camera, because youhave so much to focus on that. You really do need that team of peoplearound you to support you, because I mean it. It takes an entire crew, asyou just said, so you you've bounced around a little bit um w with a coupleof different networks. What would you say has been the biggest challenge thatyou faced in getting great jobs and and moving from network to network? I think for me, I experienced such arat race. I experience F my own personal journey. I was never in a place very long. Ifelt like a glorified contractor in a...

...lot of ways and I I wish I would havehad an opportunity to you know after the the road trip ESPN little stop. Iwish I would have had something to where it was consistent with the sameteam and there's a lot to be said of hey. The good news is, we can throw youin a lot of different situations and you figure it out, but at the same timeI always envied those who had the same producer who had the same people in thebooth who had you know things like that, and I think that's something that that's something that I feel like Imissed out on. That was also, at the same time, probably one of the greatestchallenges I ever face as well. Yeah I mean there's always somethingnew going on. There's, always something to learn if you're covering a differentteam every week, even a different sport Um, but I feel like the skills youlearn doing that are extremely valuable, because now youcan adapt to pretty much any situation. That's that's honestly how I feel Ifeel like I have been thrown into so many situations that are incrediblylaughable. One is my favorite. It was an audition and it's it's so funny too,because I didn't realize it was an andition at the time, but I'll neverforget. I wasn't even handed the script for prompter until I went on, I want tosay it was maybe ninety seconds prior they were miking me up. I had no ideaman that what even I was about to talk about my gosh in my sports segment and and it went live and then it goes onyou tube and I'm like Oh my gosh. If people could only know- and it was fine,could it have been better absolutely just reading through it once or twiceabsolutely, and I still remember being like great so this is on you too peoplecan look at it and they're going to think that I've no idea what the heckI'm doing, but they don't know the backstory and sadly, I feel like thosetypes of moments still keep me up at night. You know, oh absolutely, I love how you broughtup that word back story because I feel like being in this business. I meanreally in any industry, but we're talking about sports media andbroadcasting. There's always a back story toeverything and in the age of the Internet, where things go vire all thetime. Everything's posted everywhere, likeyou said, your audition was on you tube like no one knows the backstory. No oneknows that you just got poured on thirty seconds before you wereinterviewing someone on the field like there's just so much. No one knows that,like a fan, just yelled at you for whatever, like there's so much thatgoes into being on camera and also covering live sports that sometimeslike I just wish tha t that was talked about more because youdon't you don't always know the back story, right, yeah, you don't and Ithink those backstories the back stories in those sidelinemoments is, is part of our storyline. You know and either in those momentsyou can fold and you it can be crippling or you put it in your backpocket and you're. Like you know what I'm just going to take this with me tomy next stop and know, it's only going to make me better yeah and it's actually, it kind of addsto it. As long as you have a positive attitude like it adds to the challengeof like wow thirty seconds before I went, live x, yzust happened, but I wasstill able to power through. I didn't forget what I was going to say. I stillnailed it Um to that end. What do you think is acommon misconception that people have about siline reporters I feel likethere are so many stereotypes out there. I think people probably underestimatethe prep work that goes in a game right, because not only are we, you know youalways hear where the eyes and yours were the eyes and ears, but we alsohave to be able to be incredibly flexible, with our words with ourdelivery and to crunch a lot of things in a short amount of time at any, giventime that your producer says hy. Are you ready? So I think that's one thingtoo that I I feel like I would always bow up and and flex when people wouldbe like yeah. But how much are you really studyind? I'm like? Oh, you ave,no idea and then even it's the day before. That's when we finally get tomeet with coaches and players the day before we're not even talking about aweek out for you to Pres. this is a day before type thing. We get the stats. Wecan get some really qool story lines, maybe the week of, but for the mostpart, it's it's the day before, because we're going to run with something thatis current, something that was said to us and implement that into the game. SoI definitely think it's just it's. The combination of your studying and you'repremping so much, but you have to be ready to think off the cuff and to beincredibly flexible and you'R prepping for words that maynot even be said cause they may not get...

...to you on a certain topic, which Ithink is the most frustrating part, because you do all this prep and youmight have this awesome story on this one player and all you're waiting forus for this player to make a big place. So we could talk about hem and it neverhappens. And then you know you never get to tell that story. Yes, I know. IGosh yes, those moments are like I put all of this work and effort. It wasgoing to be great t a. We knew where the family was sitting in the stadium yeah, all those things no out thewindow. ANYTHING UP AND KINDOF goes out the window too yep absolutely so.You've covered many different sporting events for different networks. What aresome of your favorite memories that stand out? Okay, sorry about Joon, I I'm sure you havepolenti. No, I think for me, so covering basketball consistently wasnever a thing for me. So to have the final four here inAtlanta was incredible. I got to work with NCAA tcom. I was their reporter. Iwas interviewing, you know, M Petino and I'm trying to think of all the other mcoaches that were there anyway. For me, that was really cool because it was inmy home town. You know that was the that was also the the Dome where I gotto cover the Falcons that year and it just it felt like home for me and tobe able to cover basketball being in such a football or golf dominatingworld. Like that that was kind of a lot of what I did that was fun for me,because I was just never a sideline reporter for basketball at a consistentpace and then, in addition to that, I got to do the frozen for Um for NCAADOC come which is so funny, because these are two things that happened a long time ago, but I'll still, neverforget them and the frozen for and look I to process this I'm from BirminghamAlabama is not football. Is Everything in baseball hockey is I mean I don't even know ifit's an afterthought truly in Birmingham, so for me to experience thefrozen for atmosphere was something I'll, never forget. It was just sospecial m and what's so cool and I'm sure you get this, but college iscollege athletics. There is just. I have to be careful when I sayinnocence, because now there's so many things that are involved e, but thereis still such an innocence that you know when they make it to the final forthat championship game. Those moments are just unmatched, no matter whatsport you're playing the energy, the atmosphere, the diehards and for me toexperience that with a sport that I'd never experienced before was reallyreally cool yeah. I completely agree with you on college athletics, Thereis,nothing like it there's just this extra fire that doesn't exist in professionalsports, even though obviously professional sports is completely orextremely competitive. But I don't know: There's there's something differentabout college sports and I'm glad that you got to cover hockey becausecovering hockey is is a lot of fun M and I hope that it made you a hockeyfan a little bit. It did that y. u you say that because I foundmyself that year watching you know the draft and I'm like. Oh my gosh. Iremember these guys. They went to this school that I covered and and hockey isso fun. It is so fun to see in person. I think for me growing up. I justdidn't have that opportunity and then my gosh, I moved to Atlanta and thethrashers are here one year and then they take them away. So I just haven'thad that that hockey opportunity and the frozen Bor was such a blass. It ithands down one of my favorite memories. Is there a sport that you haven'tcovered? You know I've never covered gymnastics which you know with me goingto. I I graduated from Alabama and gymnasics is huge in the SEC, so Inever got to cover gymnastics which would have been a lot of fun and then I never covered bolleyball,which I played in high school and volleball still to this day, one of myfavorite sports, and so I I hate that I never got to cover bolleyball, probablygymnastics. Those would probably be the two. I would have so much fun doing so,while you're traveling and you know working all these different sportingevents. At some point, you meet your husband. How did you guys meet so the the short version? Amaliaerorersthere's, never atuar vergion of these stories. I know it always happens thatway. No, the shore version is he he was playing for Atlanta. I I honestly this is the gods, honesttruth. I really did not know him when I was working there. We always make jokesabout it, because you know he was the...

...number three Tiean or the number twotied in point b. He wasn't the guy that I was interviewing. I was interviewingmcryan and Rotty whyte and toniaganzalas people like that. So I really you know we did notcommunicate, however, that year, when I was their teamreporter, this is right when twitter started taking off right. This is twothousand and ten so a lot of people. Some people had already been onto ither, but it really started taking off around this time. So part of my role was, I followed allof the players and we were kind of monitoring hey. What are they sayingnumber one, because we're going to use them for postpractice, soundbites ndand ask them about things and interviews. In addition to make surethey don't Sey anything done right, Ahe, consin, and so he had said something about HarryPotter and I just made fun of him and I basically called him out and to thisday I still have yet to watch or read any of those books, but now it's out ofspite than principal, and so he turned around and he made some joke and basically was like hey. Youwant to go see the premier with me not like this huge Er. Like you know,Aharry Potter was coming out to the movies. He wanted to go, see the movieand I was like no a first of all. I I work for the Falconsecondwll. I have a boyfriend right now and third, like absolutely not- and Ieven remember going to tell my boss in Hey- I don't know how this happened,but so, and so just ask me to Co to this Moy and Iju. I was so embarrassedbecause I was like oh my gosh. I don't want to get n due, like I didn't askfor this, and so anyway, it was really funny andthen fast forward. The next year and thewalkout happens, I'm put on a climson spring game and he was one year out ofClimson and- and you know I mean with the Spring Games. My Job is totspecifically interview specifically interview, alonmy playersthat might be roaming. The sidelines and you know the fun colorful interview.So I sent him a message and I was like hey: Are you going to be at Thi SpringGame because I'm the sidelon reporter- and this is this- Is Kindof? What I'mlooking for and and Oh yeah, by the way, do you have any friends that are comingor do you know any of the players that are coming and so sure enough? He waslike ca I'll, be there I'll give you I'll give you an interview and and I'lltry to wringle up some other guys. I was like great thank so much so springgame happens and I never follwed up to. Let him know that I wasn't on that gameanymore and I actually got switched to Mississippi state last minute, yeah and then and then our paths crossed later. Youknow, I guess it was around an off game that next fall season, and I was offthat that weekend and I went to a a Falcon's game. I was helping thecheerleaders on the sideline wit some stuff and we just sort of connected,and I think we went out twice and that was it. You went out twice and that wasit I mean it was yeah. I just we I I knewvery early on yeah and our lives were so crazy. At that point, I think forboth of us finding someone that understood the crazy that wasn't in it.For you know, I wasn't one of these girls that waschasing m. You know his teammates or anything like that. Ye H, in additionto I told him, I was like look I've. Never I've, never dated a footballplayer. I you you guys are the ones that I interview. I kind o want nothingto do with you, and but he was just different. He was so different and,what's really fool is now that we've been oknow marriage six, seven yearslater and two kids Um, some of my former colleagues from the Falcons arelike. Oh I mean if we could have picked anyone H, that's who we would havepickd for you and I was like Ol. This is sweet, so it's just this cr it thiscrazy. You know yeah, that's the short, that's the short version of it Imanda. I love that story. It's like adifferent version of yeah. Well, I pursued you for a year and finally, yougave at y exactly, but I mean what a crazy way to start a relationship toolike he has a plane career. You have your own career. How did you guysjuggle all of that? It was actually this really beautiful blessing. We hadthe exact same schedule, so I say that because I would be gone Wednesday toSunday typically and our off days, Wer, both Monday and Tuesday, so actuallyKinda worked out and then we felt like we had these teacher schedules right.The bulk of both of our work was in the fall, and then we have a lot of time onour hands after the fact, no graed. Of course, I was still working and doingthings piecing it together, but it wasn't this consistent, eight to fiveMonday through Friday gig. You know what I mean so yeah it was. It was thisbeautiful blessing of we would you know if I was on the road? I was alwayscoming home on Sunday nights. If he had...

...in a waygame. He was always coming homeliterally right after the game, and then we both had our Mondays andTuesdays off and most of the time we just sat and stared at each other anddidn't mow, because we were so tired and then other times we would. You knowjust hang out and anyway yeah. It was areally beautiful blessing that we somehow ended up having the exactingschedule, which was selful yeah. That's so rare! That's completely! That'sthat's not normal! So I'm glad that you recognize that as a blessing 'causethat doesn't always happen Um and then, when you had kids into the mix.Obviously, that's like a completely different ball game where now you'relike okay, so we made that work, but now we have to figure out how to makethis work with both of our careers yeah. We did, and you know we both kind ofwalked away. He retired- and I I kind O- walked away from aspiring for thisnational position. If you will- and we bothwe're we're homebodies at at the core- and I think it took me a long time toembrace hay- that's not a weakness and it's okay, meaning I can still havehigh ambition and achievement and knowing that settling so to speak, tostay in Atlanta, because I know that creating roots and having a little bitof stability in a city for our family. For, however, many idears, that means alot to us is okay. So in two thousand, I guess it was two thousand and fifteenor sixteen that's kind of really. When we made that that switch and we movedto Atlanta and, like I said he retired, and then I started focusing on regionalstuff and trying to figure out this Atlanta trajectory. You know of what mycareer could look like staying in the city, I'm so glad that you you bringthat up, because it's so hard for anyone, but I think specifically forwomen, because for those of us who want to be a good wife, be a good mom and bea great professional in whatever we're doing, there has to be some sort ofcompromise. So once you came to that realization of like okay, I can't Ican't do everything and not that you're, giving it up but you're, just kind ofshifting focus that must have been hard for you,because you spent your entire young adulthood crepping and focusing on thiswild, crazy dream, career, yeah, nd. What's so cool Amanda is thateveryone's story is different and that's what's so great. Is that I lovecelebrating everyone else's story? You know the fact that I'm not living onthe west coast or New York doesn't mean that I'm not content and I think,there's a really big difference between contentment and complacency, and Ithink I went through this. I mean it was a little bit of a grieving processand healing process of going okay, a lot of things that I used to think thatI want. I don't want anymore, meaning I don't want to be moving a ton of timesin my career. I want to stay put here in Atlanta and that that's going to be part of mystory that I can control and I'm OK with that and they're definitely, likeI said, was a grieving healing process with that and the Self Talk of sayingNicky. That's! OK, your worth isn'ndictated by the network thatyou're on your worth, isn'tdictated by you not living in you know on the WestCoast or in New York and again what network you're on, and I think that forme once once I went through that process of grieving or healingwhatever it was and all be honest. Kids helped that Umkids having my first child really helped that, and I was still doingregional stuff and once I had her and my husband, who again I mean he he's anathlete trying to figure out his life too. You know it's not that it's justabout me either, and so he had to take his healing process of I mean my gosh.He had been in that world for what almost twenty years- and that was allhe knew so for both of us. We were both entering this really intricate world ofocrab. What now, in addition to hey, we want a family, what's it going to looklike for a family moving forward and so back to when I had my daughter thatsolidified so many things nd, and you also have to understand too AMAA. A lotof that comes from my own upbringing of my parents were divorced when I wasreally young and my mom was a single mom and she worked all the time and shetravelled all the time, and I just remember how that made me feel you knownot to slight her by any means. But I just remember going not only do I want a big family, but Iwant to be present because i'afall...

...short and a lot of other stuff, but forme being present and raising my own kids and not relying on you know ittakes a village, but I feel like I just need a preface that was saying. I justwanted to be present. So those were all things that that Kindof came into themix and my faith plays a huge part and my decision making and my discernmentand I just knew that the other stuff would sort itsef out and and it alwayshapd yeah and, like you said everyone's different, but I think there is anadded pressure in this industry, because it's such a public career thatmhm there's a lot of outside pressure to keep going and to be bigger and tojoin a better network and to have a a bigger role, an a more front facingrole and get these big interviews and host. These big shows and wellthat'sall amazing. It's it's also. Okay, if at some point you're like actually mypriorities, ave shifted- and I you know- I don't want to move around a bunch oftimes. I don't want Ta, you know do this and that I I want to put my familyfirst, but it's a lot. I mean we live in this world where everyone comparesthemselves to one another and instogram can be so unhealthy at times and it itreally takes. I think it takes more strength to step away from a careerlike this. Then it does to continue on because you put your own you, you setthe bar high in the beginning. Like you said you wanted this national career,you know like, and I can relate Tonala you just Ke, you put your head down andyou move here and you move there and you take this job and and it takes atoll and when you step back and you're like look actually, you know, I want toput something else. First, that that takes a lot of guts it. It really does it does. I I mean I, it really does butt at the end of the day when stability is something that you've always cravedfor your family. It kind of makes it alittle bit easier and you know I actually I don't know if you've beenreading or Paulaferis has written a book calledcalled out and she was an anchor on GMA cohost of the view, and I really Ireally respect and admired that heck out of her and her whole book is basedon how she left two dream jobs to pursue her true calling and that'sKindo how I felt- and she talks a lot about you know, and it ind deeply resonatedwith me of how work could become this addiction, because you- and I both knowthere is a there- is an a Goronalin rush that comes with our profession. Myhusband experienced it as an athlete doctors, insurgeons experience it whenthey're, you know about to do some epic surgery. That requires their fullattention and it's like that in a lot ofdifferent professions. However, in our business I could easily see how you know and of course my indentity wasso wrapped up in it and I say past tense because it's not any more, it'sit's a big part of who I am, but for so long my identity was was wrapped in it.In addition to it has addiction tendencies rightbecause it goes back to that rat, racept, okay, the next big job, thenext big city, the next big game, the next big person you get to cover thenext coach you get to talk to the next there's, always something next, whichis okay, because you know ambition and achievement is important to me. But atsome point I had to look at myself and go nicky. When is enough enough- and I remember talking to one of my friendsabout this- because you know people that aren't on the inside- if you willof TV, might have seen me on at e SPN game and Goman like she made it, and I still remember, I got to do aFriday night, ESPN game and that's what I wanted. But then it was like okay,but how do I get to that game n decade and backing? And at some point I go Oky?What else do I have to prove because I feel like I still have all of theseunique gifts and skill sets that I can still share with people and experience the profession in a waythat I want to experience it in a location. I E A home where I want toexperience it. That is equally important to me not toanyone else which that's something that was part of a healing process too. Butto me it's crazy. I guess I realized thatambition was addictive before you actually said those words, but for somepeople it can take away from other things like there are some people, menand women who can figure out how to balance it all, and you know it's noteasy, but they they figure out how to move around and still have a greatfamily and still have a great job, and that's amazing, but not everyone'sbuilt that way Um and it's really...

...important to recognize what works foryou and your family and what you're prioritizing it's funny, because I cancom. I completely relate to everything that you're saying, especially thewhat's next okay. This is great. I love this o one, the next and even thoughwe've been talking about that sort of in a negative way. There is a positivepin on what's next Um, specifically for you, because you have a couple Fprojects in the work that I do want to talk about. Both of them. Life is just so nuts, whether there's apindemic or not Um trsalways, something going on, and you have two little onesand you've got some other sidegiks happening. So first tell me that you'renutrition coaching journey this is so interesting to me. Yeh We youare sostate to bring that up. I also feel like I need to go back and profast andsay I hope that doesn't sound negative, that's not my intentioO, I think. For me, it took a long time for me to be vulnerable and to go through thatprocess of saying talking myself out of that rat race and and really trying tofigure out my worth ind it all and still wanting to achieve and haveambition, but also, at the same time, not letting that go back to become myidentity D nd. When I read Paula's book and she used the word addiction, itreally hit me like a ton of Brokson to where I went. Oh Man has this become an addiction in my life,because sometimes I felt like that's all I wasfocused on. So that's what I really want it to be Um careful with of how I communicated that,because I still to this day I mean I can't imagine being in anotherprofession. I really can't it's there's there's nothing that compares to it andI still love it so much, even though it looks different and that's a good thing.Absolutely it's a great thing. Maybe negative was the wrong word to use andmeant that we were speaking about it in a way that can seem detrimental.Perhaps if you become addicted to the what's next, what's nextyess and- and I think that we all thrive onthat in a way whether it's in our personal life or professional life Um,but sometimes some people need to take a stepback and realize that that's notwhat their focus needs to be on. So we'll take me negative word out of that. No T! It's okay! I think it's just yeah,it's one of those things where I'm like. Oh my gosh, I've just had this epiphanyof Um from yeah anyway ar we can move on. No, it's totally fine, there's justthere's a lot of mental awareness that comes with any sort of shift in yourlife, whether it was out of your control, or you made the decision toshift M and it's different for everyone. So I appreciate you being real andsharing that part of your life, because I know that at one time I'm sure it wasextremely heavy and there might be days where you even are like wait. Did Iactually? I actually still want to do that or you know, let me figure out.You know what to do now. So yeah well, Tas othing too, for people that are init and that this is me being real too. I think we might be. You know in acontract and on a network they might be more careful of what they say about howthey're really feeling or what cor experience was like, and so for me, Ikinda have nothing to lose and I just had so many conversations withpeople who kindof had a similar experience of Oh man. If I'm notcareful- and I D- If I don't have my my ish and line ie my family, my moralcompass, my my faith in tiscerment towards decisions- um it can get out ofit- can get out of hand if I'm not careful, yeah, absolutely but nickyyou're, not completely out of the broadcasting space bemause you're,launching a potcast which is so exciting. Welcome to the bodcastingworld. It's a blast! You're going to love! It tell me all about your newshow.You are so kind well. First of all, I love your show. I loved listening to many episodes before Youe had meon as aguest, and thank you I mean something: That's never going to change. I loveconnecting with people. I love understanding what makes them tickhearing their story and specifically for my podcast, it's called sidelinesand storylines, and it was this createve baby of an idea that I came upwith three years ago and I can't tell you how many notes in my phone that Ihad of ideas and concepts and you name it andI'm sure you have the same thing and it was always in the back of my head andnow being in this professional and personal space. You know I m I'mworking from home now I was anchoring local sports in Atlantauntil the pandemicat and and we have yet to go back on air. So there's that and it just it forced me into thisplace of going.

You have everything at your fingertips,you're in the drivers seat. You can still have conversations on a differentplatform and still make a difference, and bymaking a difference I mean it's called silines and storylines, and the wholepremise of the show is talking through sideline moments. Right and I tot Imean physically being sidelined by maybe you've got fired, maybe somethingyou tried failed. Maybe you got a divorce, maybe lost a baby, thesethings that are real and they're vulnerable and they're hard to talkabout, but at the same time that's what makes yure your skin thicker. That's what givesyou an ability to walk in a room with a different level of confidence because you havebeen through some stuff and you have bounced back and it's all a part of your storyline now. So that's reallykind of how I came up with the concept, and it was really from my own healingprocess that we've talked about of going. You know when I still mentor andtalk to young girls wanting to get into this profession D. I'm like you, haveto know going in that you are going to get knocked down ninety nine times andyou've got to get back up once, and so that's really what drove me to to the name, to the concept and to theconversations that have been so fun to have. These are such important conversationsto have too because I feel like if we struggle alone, we might assumeother people are going through something similar or have gone throughsomething similar, but it's not until we hear that someone has gone even ifit's something different than what you might be going through, just to be ableto hear a real conversation like that and be inspired is so critical,especially now, even if you take the pandemic out of our current world, I'mlike the Internet is so scary, like N, it can be so unhealthyand, like I mentioned before, you're constantly, comparing yourself to otherpeople- and you know Instogram- is such a highlight reel where you know youmight look at. I might look at your instr an be like Ohy, not Shehas got itall together. She's never had anything hard happen to her in her life and anthat's just not true for anyone, so I applougyou for having thiseconversations. I think it's extremely important at any point, but I think nowespecially yeah. It really is, I think, what's so beautiful that has come outof this horrific situation of just being in a global pandemic. Is that I feel that people are being real morethan ever yeah. I love the creative ways that we have been brought into. People'sbasements include theie are homes in general andBedroomwell. That's where I'm recording right now I mean thes anchors. These late nightshow hoses, it's been so unique and cool to see and hilarious to see,thereare kids coming ont on their wiy things that show how human we are, and I think thatthere is just this way of this new wave right of humanity. I feel like that.That's going on right now that is so beautiful and should be applauded, and I've just always been that type ofperson. I it's hard for me to be friends with anyone that isn'ttransparent or vulnerable or just flet out real, and I think, sharing struggles is incrediblybeautiful and powerful, because it only makes us stronger and that's probably what I've enjoyed themost coming out of these stories. You know it's: It's hearing, hey thishappened, but guess what happened after that? You know and there's just so muchjoy that comes from the setback to come back story. Absolutely. I think it also not onlygives us a new perspective, but I think it also helps us appreciate otherpeople more once you realize the struggle that they've gone through andhow they overcome it, or even, if they're still going through it. I thinkit helps sort of not only relate to fellowhumans, no matter who they are, but also it just you root for peopleknowing that, like they're, not perfect, I think we hold a standard, a reallyhigh standard for other people in general, whether they are celebrities,athletes, Um, anyone that has a public a public career. We hold them to thisstandard of like Oh, they make a lot of money, so they must have a great lifeor m they've, never had any sort of struggle, and once you humanize people,it really changes your perspective and and how you see the world reallywithout being said. The point of the show really is to highlight awesomewomen like yourself, who are making a name for themselves and sports andwe're seeing more and more women getting opportunities that we've neverseen before, like in coaching and scouting, and play byplay etcetereneedsamazing. How encouraging is that for...

...this industry? Oh I love it and youknow Ma I'll, never forget the first game I ever did for Esp N. Iwas so nervous. My play I play was Bethmelens and bath is one of the mostmarvellous human beings. She is a bulldog in all the right ways and sheis so gracious and all the right ways- and I remember that experience molding me in away ofjust watching her studying her watching how hard she works and going this is so encouraging on so manydifferent levels. So, for me, witnessing that first handwas really really cool and I I think it is encouraging. I think that you know there are a lot of. There are a lot of men out there thatare coaches than never playd the game. You know they're learning, just likeeveryone else. So why can't? Why can't females go down that route too? Youknow that's something where I'm like Holda. Well, you didn't play either. Sowhat makes you special right, hit's so true, Knoso yeah, but that that firstgame that I did with Beth was one of the most encouraging experiences thatIvehad. How can we better support each other? I feel like on the outsidepeople. Think females in this business like they think that we're all eachother's competition, but really most of us, understand that there is space foreveryone. Most of us see and understand that we're all in this together. How?How can we spread that message and like let people know that, like we are hereto support each other yeah? Well, I think it's still having conversationsand I think it's reaching out to people even if it's a cold email of someonethat you haven't seen or spoken to in a while and just saying, Hey like you're,crushing it because he here's the other thing too aanta. I felt like when you're in it sometimes sometimesyou're so busy right you're on the road you're, just tired, you're, exhausted,add kids into the MEX and there's not a lot lest for your own. Take right and Ifeel like we are humans on earth and we are made and created not to fill ourown tank but to fill other people's stanks, and I just think that's soimportant I'll. Never forget you know doing games where I felt like I had ahorrible game and then Shelley Smith sends me in email. She said Hey. I justwant you to know like you're doing a great job, and I was like oh my GoshElley, like you have no idea what that meant to me an and how H forhow long I held on to those words of affirmation- and I think that's what'sso important- is continue to have those conversations and you don't have tohave it in in a public setting. You know what Imean like you, don't have to put it out there just physically, so people cansee it, but Myou have someone's number of tepttom. If you have their emailaddress, email 'em- and I just think that Um, you know what's really cool-is a social media- has brought out this beautiful side of Um. It's on, I hate using the word Sorority,but but it is like this wordy grouping, if you will of women and our industryand social media, that that is, a great thing that has come from socialmedia ishow we can stay connected and sure the the public affirmation is great, but Ialso don't want people to forget about that private affirmation as well. Youknow those intimate things of you know when you see them. I don't know whenyou think of somebody just just sent em a message anyway, it doesn't have to beon a social imediate platform, decersion eeplaform's great of course,but I think one thing that I try to take.Anto consideration is going okay, but let's get back to theintimate communication as well, you know picking up the fon sending upsending a tax Um yeah that type stuff. I think that's so that's more important.Now more than ever. I think, because I feel like with the presence of socialmedia. It's allowed us to be connected, but at the same time it's allowed us tobe physically disconnected if that makes sense, yeah. No, it definitelymakes sense, and I feel like just remembering that everyone's human, Ithink there is an intimidation factor where, if I see Niki on es p n likewell, she hos' way too big to even read an email from me or a DM FOM me likeI'm not going to reach out, even though she inspires me, and I want her to knowthat she's doing a great job but truly like it doesn't matter how big youthink. Someone is we're all human and we all need encouragement at some pointin our lives. So I think just remaving that intimidation is important, no matter who it is, I think justreaching out and encouraging people is Um. It's it's a really big step and,like you said it it's something that is...

...more valuable than you might think.Well, and it's super important too, to have that. It's super important for ye to havethose people around you right, because we would be nothing without. We can'tdo it all on our own. We might be able to physically get there on our own, butemotionally it can get lonely and it's hard it'shard not to have those people around you're, saying hey like let's, let'sput that one to rest get back out of tomorrow or Hay, you did a great jobtoday and it's not some Rando at home that is taing on in you know a andputting up something on Ancestory F of you on TV, it's someone who intimatelyknows you and might have known what you have gone through the past two days inthe past month. You know- and I think that's why it's even more important tostay connected with people an and also when you ask how they're doing really ask howthey're doing nonot just a surface level Hemanda. How are you hey mano?What have you been struggling with lately? How can I you know? How can Ibe thinking of you or praying for you or what do you really need right now?You know yeah, that's huge and we need people like you who are doing thosethings, because it does take a lot of mental and emotional strength forsomeone else to be there for someone else's struggles, because we all haveour own struggles too, and sometimes we can't compartmentalize. You know a lotof people that are struggling might not have the capacity to realize that otherpeople are struggling, and sometimes it can help you to reach Aup to someoneelse and talk through their struggles as well. So thank you for doing that.This leads perfectly to my last question and I'm sad that it's the lastone because there's so muc more than we could talk about who is a woman whoinspires you, a woman in sports who inspires you? I'm sure you have plenty.You can name a few if you would like, but that's how I like to end the show.Oh Man, where do I even start? You know it's tough right, oh gosh, I you know this is probably so I've always been inspired by RobinRoberts. That's like she has always been someone that youknow when people ask the question of okay, if you could interview anyone whowould havebee. My first answer is always condolys Arice, coupled withDolly Parter, not at the same time, of course, for different reasons, and thenI'm like I gotta have Rother Robis in there. I am so inspired by her and herjourney M, specifically even just not even the cancer thing and who she is asa woman but being on camera. You know at a timewhere I mean she's, just an O g. In my opinion- and I just I love her. I loveher zest for life and she is someone that I wish. I could just give a bigold hug and sit down, have a cup of coffee with and ask her a millionquestions. That's who I would want to sit down and talk to o I'm in Fireguyde.Well, you know: What's really cool is now you have a podcast where you canreach out to Robin and be like Hey Robin want to come on my show Kno. Iknow she I do. I get Giddy at the thought of just sitting down and beingable to talk to her one day. I think her career is incredibly insiring andevery time she talks it's hard not to just lean in and listen. I love her.She is amazing, I'm going to give you one chance to plug your show so todathis day that we're recording is the day that your new podcast launches, soit will be live by the time. This episode is released, which is superexciting, so tell us where we can listen and if you want to plug yourfirst gast feel free, but it's okay, if it's still a secret. Oh No! It's fine,so siline anstory, lions, launched August fifth and I went ahead and I putup three episodes. I have one of my friends interview me and my story,which obviously gives a little background of why I startad the thingin the first place. In addition to I had two of M Y, my friends colcubliche's on ESPN and Sandra Golden, who is the queen she's a Nolle by the wayAmanda Nice loves ferseminals. She is the queen of Atlanta, radio as BHE lonefemale voice and Sports Radio in this town atwas one of the first people I ever met and is just such a gift to me as afriend inamentor. So those are my gues. I have some really fun ones coming downthe Pike, I'm so excited, and you can you can find it anywhere that that youget your potcast sidelines, hand story lines, and I am so honored that you askme to come on your show. Oh thank you nicky, I'm so excited for your new show.I'm excited for your journey and podcasting it's in adventure. You willm struggle with certain things so reach out. Whenever you have a question oreat advice, it's a lot of fun. I wish you so much success on this new journeyand in this next chapter I'm so excited to listen to your show, and I hope thatyour family stays safe and healthy. I...

Man I thank you so much. I am just sograteful that you asked me to come in your show and again you were doing aphenominal job interviewing some amazing women hearing their stories,and I am just fortunate that you decided to talk to me for some reason, as I'm sure you can gather, nicky losescompassion and humility she's. The perfect example of why I started thisshow in the first place not only to highlight women and sports, but sheerstories of authentic women who build others up, no matter what they're goingthrough in their own lives. I'm also so excited that Nikie is joining it onpodcasting. I've really enjoyed interviewing for and hosting this show,so I'm excited to support her in her new adventure, as Nicky mentioned, hershow is called sidelines and story lines, and it is officially live now,so go check it out. As always. Thanks for listening to this show and I'llcatch you next week.

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