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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 21 · 1 year ago

20. Caley Chelios, Reporter and Radio Analyst, Tampa Bay Lightning

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Although her childhood was very unique, Caley Chelios didn't think it was all that different from anyone else's. She grew up at hockey rinks, watching her dad play in the NHL for many years. Looking back, it's the reason why she's dedicated her career to the sport. Caley was hired as an on-camera Reporter and Host for the Tampa Bay Lightning in 2016 and has since expanded her role into the radio broadcast booth, providing color analysis for home and away games. Not sure if you've noticed but there aren't very many women doing color in the NHL. Caley spouts off a few of her favorites, the ones she looks up to and uses as motivation to press on in this male dominated space.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes. Here's your host, Amanda Borgeous, Hello, welcome in. I am back aftertaking a little brain break last week. Sometimes we just need that you know Ifeel like I need those now more than ever, but now I'm back and a'm ready toshare even more awesome interviews with you. If this is your first timelistening, this is a show that highlights top women in sports. That'sanyone from a broadcaster to a coach to a player to a CEO and everyone. Inbetween that being said, I am always open to recommendation. So if there's abadassed woman in sports that you want to hear from just let me know, my dmsare open on INS agreement, wit, er a, and so she goes pod. My guest this weekis Caley Chelios. We met through the hockey world. She and I started workingfor our respective teams. Around the same time, I was with the Rangers. She,of course, is with the lightning shes stayed in hockey and in a span of aboutfour years. She's done really amazing work and, of course we talk a lot aboutthat in this episode. Cayley is a reporter and a radio analyst for theTampa Bay lightning, and she comes from a very high performing hockey family.Her Dad Chris Chilios is a three time Stanley Cup champion and was one of thelongest tenured players in the NAGL. Her brother's play she played atsupercool. We talk all about what it was like to grow up in that sort ofenvironment and how it shaped her desire to get into broadcasting Cayleygot married last summer and she recently had a baby girl in April. Sowe talk all about that journey and what that means for her career movingforward. This episode is Jam Pack, So let's get right into it. Here is myconversation with Cayley Chellios, Hey Gayli. How are you hi Aanda, thanksfor having me on I'm great just hanging out in Chicago currently during thequarantine with my family and soaking it all in? How are you I'm good? Thankyou thanks for joining me, I'm really excited to CA. I feel like there's somuch to get into not only is hockeys starting, but so much any your life haschanged Um and I'm just excited to get into it. Typically, how I start is Ilike to Kinda go back to where it all began for you M and talk about yourchildhood and and how you grew up m. You have a unique story because yougrew up in a high performing hockey family. So what was that like? I? It was great. I mean it's, it'sunique now, looking back at it, I think when you're growing up and that siting,you definitely don't see anything unique about it. It's just kind of whatyou're used to and Um. You know looking back now and stillbeing in hockey and working in. You know the other side of it, just in ththe media side of it t it is cool, like thinking back to the Games and thepractices and the kind of events that my family was able to be a part of,because my dad played for such a long time professionally. So it it was areally cool experience. Obviously, having a childhood that was just aroundand inside every arena I played all my siblings played Um in our youth and then also my brotherswent on to play at the collegiate level of professional. So I love hockey and I definitely cherisha lot of the experiences I had, and it's definitely helped to make me who Iam today and inspire me to want to continue to be in hockey specificallybut in broadcast and pursue Um journalism and college, which kind oftook me to where I ended up with the Tampabay lightning and obviously thesupport and perspective of my dad has kind of shaped my hockey mind today. So it was really cool. You knowlooking at it now and it still, you know amazes me to be able to be a partof the game now in a different capacity totally, and I'm sure you see the gameso much differently today than you did growing up. 'cause growing up, you'dWatch Your Dad, and then you played yourself and now, like you said,studying it as a broadcaster, I mean how. How do you feel, like all of thathas just like blended together, it's lagether, so pevbly pretnever e? Inever stopped learning, obviously like every play. Every game, there's justsomething different. You know I watch for and being around great hockey mineson a daily basis, like my partner Dave, Michigan, the radio Voice, thelightning and rick packam brining blom, who do Fox boards play by playing colorlike I learn from them every single day and their stories, and it's amazing andit's funny Kinda hearing you know the other side of things to how media haveevaluated players. What they look for H,...

I mean calling a game is so differentthan just watching a game but M, I think just having grown up played andhaving my dad coach me Um, going to all my brothers Games growing up and incollege and beyond that Um. Having my dad and I watch games together, mywhole life, you know anything I said if I commented or critiqued or you know Congratu it was. You know hewas never um shy. I'd ask him to during the Games whose fault was there? Whatwas happening, I don't get that, and he just always would tell me to be honestif I was wrong about a player or play, and I really think that helps so muchwith just you know without having to even think about it watching a game.You know I immediately, you know I have my my breakdown, my analysis in my head ofwhat happened or what didn't happen and penalties, and all that kind of stuff,and that helps so much as I got to the job that I have now with the lightningbecause it's KINDOF, like second nature, to be able to see a play and break itdown. But what's really challenging and what's challenged me that I love hasbeen being able to articulate it in a six or seven second span live on abroadcast. You know, there's a lot of players that obviously ave brillianthockey mines, but it's a lot different when there's a Mike and a red buttonand a light in your face- and you have to talk about it on the spot and it'skind, it's really an art to be able to do it. So well, which is why you haveyou know the amazing broadcasters, you love listening to like a Dokamricker, aRick Packum m. So it's it's great, how it's Kindo collited it's it's been achallenge, but a great challenge for me to be able to try to take what Iunderstand and know and make it more of an art form, and I still have so manymore years to go. I'm definitely on the younger end when we meet all the othercolor commentators and broadcasters in the field on terms of you know, goingfrom R to rink meeting the other radio analysts, which is a very fun part ofthe job. I'm sure m you mentioned so many things that we will unpackthroughout the episode. But first I just want to know. I mean obviouslygrowing up in hockey you ere around the sport forever, but when did you figureout that you wanted to study journalism and pursue broadcasting? When did thathappen for you not until way later, which maybe sounds bad but honestly,like? I was so I'm very like in the moment with things like in high school.I really was not thinking about what I want to be when I grow up like I lovesports, I loved playing that was KINDOF. My Mo in terms of like you know the future. I just neverreally thought about it. I look at like my brothers or I'm sorry, my husband'slittle sister who's eighteen years old and going to college, and she alreadyknows what she wants to do. What she wants to study like that was just notme. I just kind of I think thought I'd always be in sports, no matter what'cause, that's just what I loved and it it gave me structure and taught me somany things that I ended up using later in life, and I went on to play collegeLacrosse and about halfway through my time at northwestern university. I waslike okay, I need to get a job like in the near future. What do I do, and Iwas like I want to do- sports and honestly, my dad and I were watchingjust N, B C Sports, and we saw Katherine Tappin, who had watched on anI shal network, two before just doing the broadcast, and I was like that-looks really fun like I want to do that. That would be awesome. You kno I'velistened to it forever. I just never thought of myself in that space until Iwas trying to figure out how I could stay in the space and watching her andwatching a lot of great women eventually do it. I kinda was just likeokay, I think I' need to give this a shot and I'll need to go to school forit. I had no M Undergrad experience in journalism, so I went to a Master'sprogram at northwestern at medill and I did that for a year and I figured Iwile ill either be terrible at this and I'll know, but at least, if I put inthe ear- and I end up being okay at it, I can you know, figure it out and Iwant to stay in hockey and I want to keep doing what I want to do so we'llsee how the year goes and one thing led to another and, as youknow too, it was all about timing, Um- and you know I waited a few months-just not hearing back from anything and Kindo struggling for the first fewmonths to really get anything like feedback, even with so hard to get fromanyone- and I did. I listened to the interview too, with Katherine Tep and Iwent on T V, jobs, dot, com and all those you know handy sights that Kindo,let you apply all over the place and it was just so hard to hear back. But then,finally, I got like a nibble with H, lightning and, and you know long storyshort. It was great because I knew at least you know, my camera ability wassuper amateur and I definitely had a long ways to go that way, but I knew myhockey inteland knowledge was something I could hopefully bring m to thelightning and and strengthen you know, add some value in that regard. It'scrazy, I mean timing is so much of you know really any in anyindustry, but I think in this industry in particular- and it really just takesone person to open the door and be like okay, I can see who you can be. Let megive you a chance, but it's not always...

...easy to get your first opportunity thatI mean it doesn't always happen quickly. No, it's so hard and like, like I said,I was applying all over the place and if I didn't hear back where I wouldhear back from like anautomated, email or I'd hear back months later sayingthe position's been filled Um and it was just hard and then I would getfeedback too from like you know, just talent recruiters, that I'd met throughmy connections at northwestern. That would kindof give me a subjectiveadvice on how I can do this and that and everybody kind o says somethingdifferent, what they like and don't like, and it's hard to kind of findyourself when you're trying to be something or not. So that was one thingI kindo learned and I'm still learning is just be yourself. You know you don'thave to overcompensate for certain things you don't have to. You know, try to be whatever BOT. You think everybody elsewants at the end of the day, sometimes just being yourself and being genuinepeople relate to that and want to watch that, and it just translates so muchbetter on camera than when you're trying to be all these things. Thatyou're, not so, I learned a lot about you- know different people and andproducers and what they like and what I didn't like about parts of the industryand and what I did just from trial and Arr and failing the first, like sixmonths out of school, really Um trying to get a job, just O kn. I was farreaching, but at the end of the day I ended up just calling people cold,calling not for jobs but for advice and asking if they'll watch my reel and getcoffee with people. You know that I didn't know that that were kind enoughto get coffee with me. So that's why I always try and help anyone that askedme, because I was in that same boat not too long ago. Yeah it! That's that's soimportant too, to just you. Kinda, have to like check your ego when you ask forfeedback from strangers, because I don't know like what they're going tosay: Yeah you only just Ip you apart and then you're, like oh shoot like,should I be doing this at all, you be for sure. It's like even the wayyou look in your outfits. It was like getting Ruste for not wearing jewel,toned, shirts or wearing sleeves on my dress or not wearing sleeves, and itwas lik. Well whyt does it matter. If I were sleeves or not, it was just likelittle nitpicky stuff that I wasn't even thinking about and then on top ofit it's got to be. You know you have to be and I was coming out of school. So Iknew my real wasn't strong in terms of my on camera presents, but I knew thatwas something that I could improve on with reps, and that was just somethingI had to do. You know there was no talking about it. It was just reps andexperience and that's something that comes with time, so you have to put inyour time and practice as best you can and then the rest should come. You knowyou do your homework, you do your job. Well, then it should it should comeovertime. Absolutely I mean I'm really impressed that this is technically yourfirst job out of school you've been with the team for what three seasonsnow yeah this would have been well. This was my fourth season, okay, so soere in the fourth, but umtruly you've you've expanded your reach. With theteam I mean there are so many different ways that you've been able to grow inyour role. It's changed since you got to Tampa. Can you just talk about allthe different ways that you've been able to grow in your Wole Yeah? I wasthe digital reporter when I first started with the lightning for for thelightning- and I also did a little bit of when the AFL was still Innerena.Football was still around. I did a little bit of storm coverage in the offseason my first year. That lightning did not make the playoff, so weimmediately covered the storm too, so I was able to kind of get in there, whichwas actually really fun. It Um it. It was a completely different sport,different feeld. The arena was way different Um and the fans and everything. So I wasdoing like live interviews in front of the crowd kindof like an inarena host, which was not typically what any of the things that Ido with the lightning besides some of the walk off interviews. So that wasgood experience too, but in addition to being the digital reporter, I hadaspirations and I had them in graduate school too, but I was kind of nervousand unsure of how I could make them happen, just not only being a woman butjust not being a former player, and I started to see more and more reporterskind of doing these insider analist rules, and I was Li. Well, I kind O. Iwant to do that. You know I want to be part of that. I want to watch the Gamesand break 'em down and and be a studioanalyst m. So I started talkingabout that with my bosses M Prevervan, Notsemburg and RV P bill wicket and youknow just kind of our digital team about wanting to be a little bit moreinvolved there, and I was fortunate enough to be they were super supportiveof that and they offered to Kindo. Let me start doing the three on threetournaments and the development camp over this summer. Two years ago now Ithink Um for the younger players coming in forDev, camping and all that stuff and the...

...draft. So I started doing that and itwas great I mean. Obviously it was not great. My first time doing it and I wastrying to talk a mile a minute and fit everything I ever knew into six seconds.Alway soundd, ed terrible, but it was an awesome start. And then I have myplayby play partner Dave to thank for opening up a huge door, and I wanted to you know: do it for thelightning as well, because my partner Dave has been doing it by himself foreighteen plus years covering the team Um, and so I I really wanted to join him, but he was the one who reallyopened the door for me and insisted well. Why don't we try Caley for thepreseason games and see how it goes. I got my shot. My first game was atCarolina Um and I think I screwed up his firstscooal call to start the game and it was terrible and I was superembarrassed,but it got better and better, and you know I the Intel and the understanding wasthere. It was just my ability to be able to translate what I saw on to thebroadcast with something Dave taught me so much about Um, and he really isincredibly his a brilliant mind, Um and a brilliant hockey mind as well a greatperson, so I have so much of where I am right now too to thankhim for because, even though I'm not perfect- and I have a long ways to go,he just e opened up the door made me feel confident and you know notinsecure about being a woman in the field and and being young and beinginexperienced. He kinda just said you know, watching him he's been doing itfor so long. I figured in twenty years, hopefully I'll be, as you know,intelligent and a is Um at grade at you know, being an play byplayer, color commentary as Davis and as everybody elseis. So you know I hadreally supportive team around me. As far as the lightning goes players.Coaches, everybody was super supportive and kind, and maybe a little surprisedat times when I'd run into certain people in the industry. You know arounddifferent rinks and they were a little surprised to hear. I was in the boothwhen I'd say that doing the radio, so it it was really cool and honestly, I'mso happy that I had the chance to be able to do it, because I want to keepdoing it for as long as I can and and eventually hopefully get into TV too.It's seriously amazing, I don't know, I don't think I've ever considered thatfor myself, mostly because doing color in it of itself is verydifficult, but for radio you're painting a picture for an audience thatcan't see what you see so, not only do you have to paint this picture sat theyunderstand, but you also have to do it in a very suscinct way. Like you saidit's an art like that is not easy to do. Do you remember like how you preppedfor your first radio broadcast like how did you even I'm sure you had manyconversations with your partner but like there's just so much that goesinto it yeah? Definitely looking back was like so nervous for it and, like I just there was like little details. Ididn't know, and I was so concerned about my voice whenI first started not only just being a female, but sometimes I tend to like. Ican talk a lot and I can be super excited, but sometimes when I'm doingwork- and I wanna make sure I come across like that was the other thingwith being a female is like well, people are not only not used to hearinga woman's voice, probably doing this, but I need to sound, really intelligentand I would question you know like. I shouldn't have to question myintelligence as I'm on the broadcast. I need to just focus on doing my job andat times I think I tried to change my voice too much 'cause. I was like well,you sound too monotone or you sound to whatever, like don't get so excitedhere, you're going to sound like a legally blonde girl, you know likegoingor Sonda own the broadcast, and so then Dave was like you know again. I go backto him, but he's really really helped me and done so much for me, but he justkind of helped me be like. I wouldn't worry about your voice just yet. Youknow like keep worrying about your delivery and your the little things.You know what you have right now is invaluable, but what you can work on isyour voice overtime. So that helps me a lot. You know in not stressing andthinking about my boys, while I'm trying to like you said too, like in six or sevenseconds, break down a play and make it exciting and fun and engage fans. Youknow that's what I should be thinking about, not insecure about my tone or mysound, because it is what it is. You know you can't change that. You know too much what what you canchange is your you know, inflection and your delivery and everything which ismore important, so um that helped a lot. I mean the prap like, like you said too,like I prepped so much for games, and I still did like even up until this year.Sometimes I weig overprapps, because you use like five percent of the twentypages that you brought in there just ar and all the confacts and everythinglike just like every other reporter, so...

...you use like hardly any of it, and Ihate when I have like great nuggets and then theressnever an opportunity to usethem, and I have to go to waste. I've always wanted to find a way to reusethat right, like there's so much imor now n, like how can I bring this backor how can you mention it? So I can bring it back shortly after B'cause, Ireally loved this nugget Um, but yeah. So I mean I I did so muchproper. I talked to Eddi. Olczeck too, is also a family friend, because he'sso great and he's been doing it so long, and he also said for those of you whowant to for people want to do radio like it's a great place to be becauseyou do have to paint the picture. There's no T V, there's nothing elsethere to show fans so that they can visualize that you have to really betheir eyes and ears and that's a great way, especially if you're starting outM to jump into it, because it forces you to kind of challenge yourself alittle bit more, and I love that about it. I definitely wasn't ready for T Vand I still like, I said, have a ways to go, but it's definitely helped moldme and understand like better ways to communicate and Um talk about the game and a little bitmore artful ways. That's so awesome, I'm so excited for this opportunity foryou, I I can't wait to see. Are you going to continue to do it this season?I know the season's a little a little wanky but yeah and pretty Wong, not no, only because typicallyPhilospozedo, who still does the color commentary for all the lightning homegames. He typically does the playoff, so he'sgoing to continue to do the playoff games with Dave and, as far as I know,it's going to be at Amily, Orena they're going to be broadcasting. Itsocial distancing from a safeway but I'll still be doing some analysis. Game previewsintermission hits between M periods on the radio, so I'm not going to be doingthe playby player color or anything like that, but still participating inthe lightning radio. So that's good. I'm excited about that. Just Wat, theway things kind of turned out and eventually t'll get turned over tonational broadcasts. Yeah. Definitely S! I don't know if you know this, but I'mfrom Tampa and Tampa Yeah. I I think we talked about thisbefore Um, so the lightning was my first introduction to hockey Um andit's kind of funny, because you know I've always been a lightning fam.Because of that- and I worked for the Rangers- and there are so many rangerslightening connections. So it's like it's fun to be a t fan of both teams M,but tampas become a really cool market. For Hockey I mean the sport has reallygrown there over the years. The team's been really good as of late and what'sbeen your favorite part about covering the team and living in Tampa yeah. Ithink that Tampa's definitely like the best or one of the best non traditionalmarkets for sure. Obviously it helps to have a team. That's been reallysuccessful in the last few years, but I just think the ownership, the playersthey've really built like community in a fan base justaround you know what they they've just been like great. Like Ilive on Harbor Island, I can see the arena in my backyard. I mean it's apretty cool concept having hockey in the sign wearing you flootfoptiondshorts and going fishing and going to the Ring Click. There's just so much tolove about it, and I was KINDOF surprised at first coming down there athow many players, especially betteran players, um players that you mentionedto with the connections to the Rangers like Ryan Calihan, Dangerarty, guys whoabsolutely loved it when they got down there- and you know Calahans stillthere and still doing a lot of charitable work for his CancerFoundation, drardhe kind of stuck around and did a podcast with thelightning the block party last year, which is still continuing, yeah Hewas, a great he was an Athomedician and everybody loved Him Yuho on the team. Yeah exactly you know Um, but it it's been. It's cool. I meanit's very different. I never expected to be in Florida N, my first job Inever expected to be covering the lightning, and it was just such a fine, excitingexperience being able to go down South and live walking distance to the rink.There's no traffic, there's great food. I think the culture the communityaround the Tampa area, especially, is as great and it's growing there's a lotof young professionals, and you know there's a lot of snowbirds too, thatare hockey fans that come down and and they obviously have their hometownteam, but everybody roots for the lightnae. I mean there's lightningsignage, all over the place. Our Marketing Group does a great job, butthe fans really like every restaurant, Um, there's just so many differentplaces around Tampa that cheer for the lightning and it's it's cool. Ourplayers love it. I think the fans in the playoffs, the last couple ofseasons, have been great Um. There's a lot of excitement around the team withtheir success and that's definitely helped drive it. But I've had anawesome experience working for the organization, they're very classy Um. They were one of the best. I mean it'scool, like you're working for a top...

...team, you're working in a great city,that's growing great ownership m and then it's just beautiful there at leastsix or seven months of the year up until summer, lenste offers and so getout of there. During the summers- but I it was, it's been an awesome experience.I love working for the team. You've been extremely busy in the last fewyears. you start with the lightning. Then you get engaged you get married.Now you have a beautiful baby girl. No, this is sort of a loadef question, butfrom an outsiders perspective, it just seems like you've, been able to thrivepersonally and professionally in such a short amount of time, and that's noeasy feat. How do you make everything work? TAT's very nice of you to say I wouldnot say it's like, maybe from the outside looking it. It may seem likethat, but I just I don't Kn, I'm a very all or nothingperson in my personality and it's like I've wanted t you kno. Iwanted this amazing job. I got this job and it's a great opportunity. I love itand then I also have a husband who I love dearly and we've been togethersince college, and we both you know we we both just love, what we do you ohe plays in the NFL and he's been playing in for four seasons. Now I'vebeen with the lightning now for four seasons and we both just found purposein our jobs, and we made the long distance work and and he would spendthe off seasons in Tampa with me, and it was great Um and then you know he weboth like when we were younger too in college, always talked about wanting abig family. But as I got my job and things changed, and I was working a tonand traveling, I just thought. Maybe I would be able to start a family laterin my thirties and there's not a ton of women in our field too, who have kidsyoung and are able to still travel to the extent that we are without gettinghelp. I talke to Shannon Hogen to from theislanders about her experience being pregnant and still working and kind ofbeing a boss for the islanderes on m SG networks about her experience and andso that kind of helped. Me Too, as I was pregnant this year, but basically II don't Kn W. I got engaged and then when we got married it was like we gotpregnant in less than a week and things really changed my God his way so yeahit was. It was pretty crazy. I won't say it wasn't, it wasn't unexpected,but it was still kind of a shock and a little bit unexpected. For me,especially M, and by the look on my husband's pate, I had to wait like twothree weeks to tell hem because he was at football camp, so I had to keep likethe biggest secret in my life Af. She preferred two and a half weeks and itwas nuts, but he was definitely getting like daddy fever. I could tell he'salways wanted to have kids like that's just he knew t of anything. He would bea great dad and he is so we did get pregnant and then we had the baby andUm she's, absolutely beautiful and we're so happy. Everything worked outthe way it did, but it was kind of like an all or nothing thing. You know weget married and then we had a kid like in less than a week. Wewre pregnant itwas like I didn't, really slow down to really take in the whole first year ofmarriage and everything we just kind of went Gogogo and I went back to work forthe lightning pregnant. He went back to work, um playing for the Green Baypackers this season and ended up going all the way to the playoffs, which was crazy inlate January early February. So it was a long time to spend apart. But youknow with great things, comes a lot of sacrifice too, and that's really whatwe've been doing. The last three or four years is sacrificing some of thetime all the holidays, pretty much, and you know ability to be around family,but we love what we're doing. And now we have a beautiful baby girl, whichWLL probably change a lot of things for US moving forward. But you know we alsowere not expecting a pandemic. So now, if they were Ben Glan o exactly it waslike throwing the pandemic, and it was like okay, iave, officially I' like tothink I I can. I have control over a lot of things, but then there was justkind of like nothing. You could do about certain things, including thepandemic. So now we just take things one day at a time and keep trudgingalong, but it was like well now I have a career, hopefully and a goodfoundation. You know if I ever have to leave or come back at any point downthe road. You know we both have our jobs and everything have reallyhelped us be where we are and hopefully moving forward. You know we can justmake it work with kids. One of my favorite pictures of you is you, withthe radio had set on in the booth, with your big pregnant belly, and it's justit's just so amazing, because I've never been pregnant. I hope toe one day,but I just like there's the hockey season is such a grind when you're likejust taking care of yourself so like let alone being pregnant and like noteven being with your spend all the time.

I truly don't understand how you ereable to do that. Like I give you so so many props, I just it's it's crazy tome like. How did you do that? I again, like I didn't think about like wheneveryou picture youre pre. I guess like I, never really pictured pregnancy butobviously I'd never thought I'd be away from my husband or where I was at thetime traveling, but I just didn't think about it and then you know it goes by so fast now, looking at it, but at the time itdoesn't feel like it. I think I've thrown up in every major arena thatwe've been to, including Sweden. I think I was vomiting during thenational during the U S National Anthem in Swet, and I waspuking in the bathroom right behind the booth 'cause. Unfortunately, I was very,very sick in my pregnancy for like six months it was not just the first. Youknow trimester. It was like almost the entire thing up until the last month,Um wet atte otetion it, but it was hard like the travel like everyone. That'sthe great thing you know about pregnancy, everyone's supersweet andaccommodating, like everyone was always asking me how I'm doing I no longer hadto carry my suitcases like anywhere. Basically, everyone was grabbing hem.For me, everyone was really supportive,especially when you're with a a plainful or a group full of guys. Youknow everyone, no one quite understands what you're going through. So everyone,fortunately for the lightning, was as supportive as possible and helped me aTine but um it. You know. For me, it wasactually great because I obviously carried the baby, so I wassuperconnected to my pregnancy. What I didn't think and realize was howdifficult it was for my husband actually because he was so removed andhe wasn't with me every day. He couldn't really see or feel the baby.Like. I got too m during the pregnancy and so being in Green Bay. He had todeal with some injuries and, and that sort of stuff and being byyourself, I think, was actually a lot harder for him than it was for me'cause. I was just surrounded by a lot of people that were helping me in apart of it, and I was traveling so much that the time was flying Um. So for him. I think it was a little bitmore challenging, but it was great Um. It was cute too, like my bump reallydidn't emerge until I was about six months, seven months pregnant, so somepeople at the arena were just like everyone, just stares at your bellywhen you are pregnant like no matter what, especially like that's allthey're looking at when they first see y they're, just like belly Um. So it was funny. Like some peopledidn't know, I was pregnant and then weere just like. When did you get tenmonths pregnant, basically elike right up anter? I was about to have the baby,so it was amazing and it was so much fun being around the rink and cool tobe able to be pregnant and still working and still doing it and feelgood enough to to keep going. So it was great, I mean everyone else wassupernised like I said in supportive the whole time I was pregnant and andeventually, when my husband got there, you know he helped a ton 'cause we hadthe dog and- and he picked me up- I no longer had tooh. That was like one of the best pirks to. I got parking privileges where theLa Ark, so I no longer had to walk in the Tampa heat to the arena. The way Inormally would, that was a huge part to it's a huge perk. You should just staypregnant. All the time had said I said I was need to get pregnant. One moreseason, get this parking access again, but noall joke's society. It was. It was a really pretty unique and coolexperience O we able to be pregnant and keep working and and do that D. I knowI talkd to Shannon Hogen too, who, as pregnant with her time, going to theplayoffs her baby, I think, also was born in April mbut. She, I think shesaid she only missed like three games, and I was like ie missed a lot morebecause of the pandemic, so I had like a whole month of bedrest almost beforeI had the baby, so for me it actually. I did get some time off to really getready, a and prepare that must have been so interesting because for a while,your mindset was oh shoot. I'm going to have this baby before the playoffs likehow am I supposed to marrs work and then all of a sudden the world stopsand the playoffs are not a thing. So then you just have time to be home andbe pregnant and then welcome your newborn and your husband's home duringthis as well right yeah, I mean he would have had to leavelike three days after she was born just to go to spring training for football.So, even though you know it, it's such a difficult time and it's it's sad.What happened to so? What's happened to so many people and businesses in theway. This whole virus has affected everything, but if I have to take asilver lining, like everyone else has really it's been time with family andmy husband and I have never spent the kind of time that we've had together Um,then we did t during this quarantine and what better time than when you'rehaving a baby to be together every day. The way we were Um, she was born in midApril and he was supposed to leave for camp by like April eighteenth orsomething. So I can't imagine if I were...

...him. I wouldn't have been able to leavelike that. Just now that I've had or and been around it's just I mean Idon't like leaving for like two hours. If I go for a walk or something so Ican only imagine how challenging that would have been um so yeah we had, andI was I was kind of bummed too 'cause. I was like, Oh God like. I don't wantto miss the playoffs. This is going to be weird like how do I jump back intoit, and so many things have to go into it. I wanted to breastfeed and part ofyou know, being the mom. You have to decide or you're going to nurse. Areyou going to formula because you need to start saving milk if you're going togo back to work, and so I had like a freezerfull like way, full of so muchmilk planning on like making it to the end of playing off somehow and then youknow everything like you said it just kindo went wonky and changed and all ofour plans changed. We ended up going to Chicago for our family to be as safeand secure as possible around family Um for the time being, until we're readyto go back to Florida- and you know, he's ready t to go back to work too so it was. It was a crazy time to bringthe baby into the world, but also kind of a surreal time for us to be able tospend months together, which we've never been able to do w. Our firstvacation was our honeymoon after we got married, so we just haven't had thiskind of quality time together before, and it made it so much easier for mehaving him around twenty four seven for the baby, so I didn't feel like I wasalone in that aspect at all. That's definitely the silver lining, and allof this is all of the quality time that people are getting with there'respouses in their family, and I mean, like you said how sad was it that hewasn't able to be around for the pregnancy, but now he's getting so muchquality time with his new daughter. I mean you know, you'll, never get thistime back. It's it's so amazing that you're getting this, despite obviouslyall of the sad and terrible things that are going on Um. I don't ask thisquestion to stress you out, I'm just curious when you plan to go back to work. Iknow that we don't really know what that means. Aside from the currenthockey bubble, that's about to happen with the extensive travel that usuallygoes into a season like. Would you consider bringing her along? I that that's like the million dollarquestion for me, as how can I contin, but it's just circumstances like you,said, there's still so much unknown and we don't really know what it's going tolook like until maybe December. If there's a vaccine, my husband and I youknow we're taking our family's health really seriously, especially with anewborn. I mean my whole perspective changed after we had her and how wedeal with the virus and being around family and quarantining and socialdistancing, especially with how crazy it is in Florida right now, um so ybefore the pandamic excuse me, I was trying to think about how I could makethis work and we thought about you know having family around whether it's in Florida or if we you know, had to get help,whether it's a nanny, we could possibly make it work, and I don't know you knowDanny's G, both of our jobs, my husband's name's, Danny our jobs are sodifficult to predict because they're so unstable. In some ways I mean I'mconstantly traveling practice schedules are never set in stone, as you know,interviews, sometimes you're, waiting hours until MHM, and then you have yourgame days. It's like a full day, eight to midnight sometimes, and it's just a it's a lot of uncertainty,so I think we would certainly need some help um if we wanted to both continueto work the way we are but we'll see too. If my husband's career, you know,I don't know if he'll play, if he'll get cut, um, what's GOINGTO happen downthe road, so we kindo just have to play it by ear and wait and say, like I usedto try to predict everything that was going to happen and try to control itand after getting pregnant I've just kind of let things go, take a day byday and so far you know everything has gone okay for us in terms of our healthor safety first and foremost, and then our careers. You know I'm still reallyhappy that I still have my job with the lightning and that I'm able to workfrom home right now. Virtually the way all of us are and then moving forward.If we get into you know what it's, what we're typically used to seeing, I'mhoping you know she can do a little bit of travel with me, but for the mostpart at least we'll have our home base in Tampa and my husband may or may notbe there. We might have our nanny, my mom might come down there, we're stilltrying to figure all that out too. It's like a crazy feeling. You know all theemotions and everything that go into motherhood and hard to imagine, leavingher, but also hard to imagine. You know not continuing to work Um and do whatI've been doing 'cause. I love it. I'm trying to channel your calm energy,because I mean we have so much going on whether you know you are a mom or youaren't to mom or what like whether you're, working or not working like. Ithink this pandemic has caused a lot of us to really like sit back and thinkabout specific things in our life and what we want and don't want movingforward, and...

I I like what you've been saying youjust have to take it at day at a time like there's, just no way to predict,what's going to happen even tomorrow, and we've seen that first hand withwith sports, not returning and then returning and you know now we have thishockey bubble, that's happening, and I mean thinking about these players too.I know that you can relate to them having to leave their families m. A lotof them have pregnant wives or young kids at home, and they have to leavethem for months at a time. It's just it's a love stress on everyone andeveryone just kindo has to like do their best to try and stay sane andstay okay Um with that being said, let's get into a little bit of hockeyfor a few minutes. What should we be paying closeattention to while watching hockey in this format? This is something thatwe've never seen before. Yeah, I think it's going to beinteresting and, like we've been talking about every there's so muchunknown with the pandamic there's so much unknown for uz from the media,fromt players. Coaches, I mean we really don't know what to expect goinginto this playoff. It's a completely different experience being able to havethis kind of time in a way to to get ready for the playoffs theexhibition game leading up to the round robin format. There's not necessarilymaybe the same emphasis I mean. I don't think that players are necessarilyoverly concerned about the ceatings and the round robin only because I meanhome advantage isn't going to be the same. Having that last Um shift changeis going to be important, but I don't know that there's anyone overlyconcerned about the ceating as it relates to your opponent, Um you're,going to be playing all four teams. It's it's going to be weird for ththose teams in the round robin situation. Kind of, like I said, T it's kind of it's uniqueyou know and that it's cool that they're going to have this kind ofpractice. Time, which I think is in advantage, especially for the lightningUm and those teams, in the top for they're, going to be able to reallytake the time to get ready and- and maybe, unlike some of these playingteams, they're going to be able to be a little bit sharper, get the rust offsooner with the extrapractice time in the exhibition style, the Round Robinmight get them ready for the playoffs Um y, I think t t they have to takeadvantage of that, whereas some of these playing teams, it's also prettycool, unique because there's really nothing to lose. Here I mean they havean opportunity to win a Stanley Cup and regardless of the format ones thepuckdrops. I don't think that their compete is going to be any different. Idon't think the physical play is going to be any different, whether or not theintensity level that they're going to be able to play with because of thelack of fans will be interesting. I don't know that that's going to be thecase, obviously W it remains to be seen, but I do think that'll be interestingto see how that does play a role if at all, in with which the intensity levelthat these players are playing with are because so much of that you know, comesfrom the fans and being able to take the fans out of the building. You knowif you're down a game or two in a series, is it a huge part of the gameso so much unknown? But I think in this new format, it's it's going to beinteresting to watch. I think for the lightning and, like I said, those topfour teams in the round robin it's going to be advantageous for them tohave the extra time to really prepare and practice. And you know it was allpretty much coming down to the systems and and that sort of stuff when theygot back. But now I think a lot of those those players m. You know who erethey signed. Coalman and Gudro at the trade deadline. Bagosian a lot of thosenew faces to some of these teams or younger players, theyve they've,already familiarized themselves and kind of got backright into the Groove,and now it's just a matter of details and we'll see which team moving forwardcan can pay attention to those details and really come together in what hasbeen such a stressful, odd time Um. You know when it matters most during theheat of the playoffs. I want people to understand how impactful not havingfans is, especially in the playoffs, and I know that the MLB has had cut outin the stands, which you know. It's like it's fun, but it's it's not thesame. So for that reason I mean there are so many reasons to be interested inthis new format. Um, not only because sports are back and Nokis back, whichis exciting, but there's just ther're so much different before they left forthe bubble. What were lightning players and coaches saying about their feelingstoward returning to play? I think, before going to the bubble for the mostpart M, it's IT SEEMD, like everybody, was still a little bit on edge. Like T,I wouldn't say, coming back to training camp felt like any other training camp,where everyone's pretty excited you're kind of hanging out with the guysmaking jokes all that kind of stuff. I mean everyone was definitely relievedto be able to unify. I think over this and come together to play hockey andsupport each other, their community and just be around each other again for thefirst time, but there was definitely an underlying tone of kind of like well.What's the health risk like, I think...

...people were players were concernedabout whether or not there was going to be an outbreak during some of thesemolunteer workouts in this training camp, leading up to the bubble and sofar you know so good, for you know the lightning and I think the Bruins justbefore theire time to go to the bubble. You know there were some concerns. Thelightning obviouslthe had to shut down facilities earlier in the summer, butnow that they're there, I think the biggest concern was just the validityof the tests and making sure once they're in the bubble that they're assafe as possible, and it sounds like they're, pretty pretty reassured thatthey are going to be as safe as possible once they get there. Ifeverybody does their part, so players, I think, were just leaning on eachother to make sure you're hammering home the message of do your best andmake sure you're doing the right things outside the arena. You're gettingtested every day- and you know people's health and and their family's health-is on the line. If you decide to do anything negligent or maybe just notreally consider consequences to you know going out to certain bars or areasthat may be infected or hanging out with people that have been infected. SoI think most players are feeling pretty good about their once they're in thebubble, but leading up to it. I think just there's a little bit ofuncertainty, a d and maybe some nerves about any player Um. You know not doingtheir job, but for the most part, obviously with the the test resultsthat have come back, that the leagues has nounce they've done a prettythey've been pretty successful yeah for sure I was going to mention that. As ofthis recording I mean so far, there haven't been any negative tests. I'msorry any positive chess, well anypasgood, yea so far so good yeah, sofar grade and and Um, I'm sure that's a huge relief too. Imean there's. This is really it'll, be interesting to see just kind of how thebubble and the way they'v structured the protocol and everything you knowhow it all comes to play in the end and other teams are obviously like myhusband's dealing with the NFL side of it and it's a much more complicated andlong term and difficult situation to try to navigate through, and I think Iwill say I do think Theannigel's done a pretty good job at keeping playersinformed, Um and also coming up with a pretty safe way to be doing whatthey're doing obviously different circumstances, because it's a shorterduration. But it sounds like players are, are excited about it, it's crazyfor you too, because you are involved on the Nh l side of things and yourhusband's involved with the NFL, and everyone has different protocols and,like you said, everything's changed since you've had the baby. Obviously-and you have this family to think about and take care of, and there's just somuch more that goes into it than just am I going to be covering a team or foryour husband? Am I going to be playing for a team this season like there'sjust there's so much more, and I think people need to remember that whenthey're, you know complaining about you know what like, if they want sports toreturn to watch on TV like, of course everyone does. But it's it's it's heavy stuff. There's there'sa lot that goes into it um, but I don't want to end on a sad slash, depressingOAS. We close out a couple more for you personally and professionally or eitheror. However, you want to answer this. What are your goals for yourself forthe rest of the year for the rest of this year? Um I mean my goal is to justput my family first and all the decisions that I that I'm going to makemoving forward, or obviously going o impact, my husband and my my daughter,and with this kind of rare time, although it's you know, been kindodepressing and sad and difficult. It's also been such a blessing and Um unique opportunity to be able to havethis kind of time together without having to go to work and travel. Youknow for over forty games and a f work, a full on HL season, so I'm going to, I think my goals right now are just tocontinue to do what I'm doing stay in hockey stay happy. You know do our bestto stay healthy and you know eventually hope for a vaccine, but I'd love tokeep working and with this work from home situation, it's actually workedout really great for me being around the baby, our dog, my husband, I N WI'm used to seeing my parents and family, maybe once a year at Christmas, I hadn't seen my brothers since mywedding last July, until I saw them after the baby was born in June. I gotto see them, so I just want to spend as much time with family. I think thequarantine has really taught me how important that is to me and kind of helped me. You know reprioritizeind andassess what is important to me and that's definitely going to be spendinga lot more time around family and and with my daughter D, my husband as muchas possible. 'cause time flies, and I...

...learned that when I was pregnant andhad the baby and now it's like she's already three months old and I can'tbelieve it so my biggest call, I think, is really to appreciate and enjoy thisfamily time and then as soon as possible. When I'm ready, you know,don't take anything too seriously and don't have too many expectations formyself but jump into work and do what you love when you're ready on my ownterms and and when my husband Um feels comfortable too with everything.I love that that's that's all that you can hope for, and that's all that youcan do it's a that. We can do and it's it's yea great, exactly exactly,there's so much out of our control that we do need to try and stay calm and control what wecan control and kind of, let the rest go which I'm preacing to myself rightnow by the way, 'cause is not ousy to do it's not easy. Okay, Cayli! Can youleave us with a woman or probably in Yew York case women in sports whoinspire you sure, Um, I guess as a whole, I mean I love thispodcast Iv love listening to a lot of different women. You've had on it,including Um Tampanative, Whitney Holdman, she's great just came up withher new book. I love following heron, her social media and seeing where herlife and career has taken her and then, as far as the hockey world, I loveChris Tempson and Catherine Tappin. Those are two women who would stand outto me a lot and and obviously some of the the former team USA team, Canada, caller analysts. If you look at what Iwant to do with my life and women, who are doing a great job at him now,including Kendalcoin, who I've been excited to get to to know a little bitbetter when we've played the sharks Tan when she's come to Chicago. I've bether a couple of times here too, and I was there for her first M B C game oncolor when the lightning played Pittsburg in Pittsburg, and it waspretty cool to to see her transition into the Tinto the field and have thesort of influence that she's had on young women in hockey in the sport ingeneral. So it's moving and growing and a ND. I think a lot of those women,especially those F for hockey, have have been the drivers for it yeah.Absolutely it's so cool to have women, especially in hockey to look up to, andyou are someone that a lot of us look up to as well fare what you're doing so.Please keep that in mind as you push forward what you're doing is meaningfuland I'm so happy that you'v found so much success, not only professionally,but your little family Um is amazing and I hope that you stay safe andhealthy and I will be watching from afar. Hopefully you will get to figure out what yourrole looks like once we all figure out what hockey looks like this season. Iknow I thank you Amanda. I really appreciate it and I love the pod cast,I'm going to keep listening t any time you ever need anything you just. Let meknow ihave plenty of time now with the baby to fit in more fun stuff like this.So it's been great and I wish you the best of Lec, two moving forward. I lovethis. The spot gass, like I said some great guests and awesome conversation. I respect cayly so much for so manyreasons. Working in hockey is a serious grind and she's proven that. Not onlycan she handle her job, but she wants to do more and she's capable of it. I'mso excited to see how far she takes her radio analyst work. We need more womenin that space and she is killing it also becoming a new mom during apandemic trying to jug a life with a newbor while working from home planningyour life figuring out what your husband's job will look like in apandamic I mean it's insane and she somehow finds a way to handleeverything with such grace. I'm really proud to call her a friend. I hope youlearnd a lot from Cayley. You can follow her on social media, at Cali,jellios on twitter and at Cali chellios underscore nl on instogram. Thanks forlistening.

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