Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 17 · 1 year ago

16. Justine Siegal, 1st Woman to Coach in MLB, Founder of "Baseball for All"

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Justine Siegal became the first woman to coach a professional men’s baseball team in 2009, the Brockton Rox of the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball. 2 years later, she became the first woman to throw batting practice for an MLB team during spring training. Since then, she has thrown BP to the Oakland A’s, the Tampa Bay Rays, St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros, and the New York Mets. In this episode, we talk about how she got those opportunities, spoiler alert, it took a lot of no’s before she got a yes...we also talk about what it was like being the only female on a coaching staff, her vision for the future of women in coaching pro sports, and her nonprofit to promote equality in baseball, called “Baseball for All". She also has a PhD in Sports Psychology.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes, here's your hust, Amanda Borgeous pay there I'm glad you're here it isyour first time tuning in this show features interviews with women at thetop of their game in the sports industry. As a sports broadcaster forthe past several years, I've been lucky enough to travel and meet so manyawesome women in sports that I decided to create a space to tell their storiesnow. This episode is very unique for me, because my guest is only the secondprofessional coach that I've had on the show. So I'm really excited for you tohear from her before I introduced justine. I need to give out my end, soshe goes award for the week this week. I'm highlighting Taylor Salmon founderof Katen's candle company. This is really cool. She realized there was ahole in the selth care market, and so she started a company that createscandles, but these are not just regular candles. She uses the therapies ofscent and sound to promote individuality, so each scent comes witha handcrafted playlist to accompany the vibe of the scent. The goal is tocreate a unique and effortless environment that instantly changes.Your mood, these benefits, include improved, focus, improved mood, stress,reduction, boost and confidence, and so much more. This is such an awesome idea.I love this. You can shop and support this black owned women owned businessat catens, CANDLECO DOTCOM and on instagram at Katen's CANDLECO. Okay,now for this week's guest, Justine Segel became the first woman to coach,a professional men's baseball team in two thousand n nine, with the brocktenrocks of the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball.Two years later, she became the first woman to throw batting practice for anMLB team during spring training. Since then she's thrown bp to the Oaklanddays. The Tampa Bay raise Saint Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros and the NewYork mets. In this episode we talk about how she got those opportunities,spoiler alert. It took a lot of nose before she got even one. Yes, we alsotalk about what it was like being: The only female ONA coaching staff, hervision for the Future Of Women in coaching Pro Sports and her non profitto promote equality in baseball called baseball for all, Oh and she also has aPhD in sport. Psychology here is my chat with baseball coach founder andkeynote speaker: Justine Segel, Hey Justine. How are you I'm goodhoware you doing Amanda, I'm good. Thank you. I appreciate you taking thetime to join me. I'm excited to talk a lot about baseball, especially sinceit's a sport that we haven't been able to watch for some time now because ofCobin nineteen. So I want to get right into your impressive career. When didyou start coaching baseball and how did you get into it? Well, I startedcoaching when I was sixteen Um. I decided first, I must say I planned onplaying for the Cleveland Indians, but that didn't work out. So I decidedI should become a coach, so it's sixteen Um. I told my coach that I would like to becoastless like him and he laughed at me and said: a man would never listen to ain our baseball field. So you know I just decided then toignore him and I started coaching right then, at summer camps and and anythingI could and then I coach collegiately...

...in two thousand, a eight for three years, a an assistant coachat Sprinkfield college and then my first pro job was than two thousand andnine with the brocken rocks in the Canamlegue. How did you fall in lovewith baseball? What made you want to play? I grew up playing the game. Justlike my brother, I I remember tbl and Um. We had season tickets for theIndian. So once we moved from La to Cleveland, my grandfather was taking mybrother and I to all the Games and Um. Well, I don't know if they were all thegames, but they seemd like a lot of games and certainly a tradition wherewe'd go and watch the game and eat everything we could and GE a bobblehead for the ride home, and so it was just fun Um. It was just fun growing up like thatand and playing and when it got harder. That's you know it all changed like twelve and underwas all fun and the thirteen and up was just all struggle. Why was it astruggle? I was thirteen. When I was first told Ishould quit playing baseball because I was a girl and I just decided that didn't make any sense to me,because I was good at it and I loved it. So I kept playing, but you know Ialways had to ask for permission. If I could play- and I was often told no andI had to find another team and Um it was, it was hard. It was hard tohave people so opinionated about whether you should be playing the game,and so I loved it. It's almost as if the moreyou try to take the game away from me, the more I loved it yeah it's funny, because I playedsoftball as a kid, and I mean I wasn't really any good, but at the time Inever even thought about playing baseball because, like you said t thosewere the rules. Girls play softball boys play baseball. Why do you thinkyou had the courage to stand up and say? Actually you know what this isn't right? Well, I think it's help that I startedin baseball, so m that made sense to me. I was playingbaseball and it never occurred to me to switch to softball. I had been asked bydifferent teams to come over, but I was a baseball player. That's what I was Iwas going to play for the Cleveland Indians. You know, so I think I just felt that it was just strong toask me to quit. Just because I was a girl. My brother was a year youngerthan me and we were often on the same teams and- and I was better than himand yet he was never asked to quit. You know- and this wasn't lost on me so asmuch as it was just baseball- I I kinda had to persevere to go through it. What was your relationship like withyour brother growing up, especially if you were better than him at baseball?Well, I was better at home than all sports, because I loved sports. I meanm when I think of my childhood, I think of myself on my bike riding itsomewhere and you know climbate trees, throwing things whatever it was. So I mean I don't know if that was easyfor him, but I certainly worked harder than him he's a lot smarter than me if thatmatters, and he grew to be like six three, so hecan beat me in quite a few things right now, but um you, we played catch andwe'd go out in our front yard, whether it was soccer r, whether it was baseball, I mean there'sso many arguments about who as to go, get the pall. You know, did youmiscatch it or was it a bad, throw anea chase it into the bushes? So I have alot of good memories. With my brother, around Um sports and just growing up in a way that you gooutside and play so we've mentioned a little bit about baseball and softball.For those who don't know 'cause, I...

...think a lot of people. A lot of girlsgrow up, having the option to play softball, not even getting the optionto play baseball. So what is the difference between baseball andsoftball, with softballs underhand underhandpitch a larger ball um? The field is shorter, the bat is longer and lighter. The easiest way to think about it isthat your favorite Major League team is playing baseball and they're, not playing softball. So ifyou have a softball background, then then- and you watch the twins play- youcan see that they're similar games, but they're two different games andspecifically for me, I was a pitcher, so m, going over to softball was like achanging sports completely yeah. I mean that underhand pitch is extremelydifficult to master and, like you said, I mean if you have a baseballbackground. That's that's not even the same thing, so it is interesting how alot of us grew up around both sports, knowing ones forgirls ones for boys, people kind of assume it's similar, but it's notreally yeah. I actually think it's unfortunate because if we continue tosay they're the same sport than Fastpich doesn't get it's it's full due.You Know Fasti, I a very fast GAM and you know you see these ely pitchersthrown and it's just like it's incredible and that's something thatmatters in the Olympics when when we were originally trying to make anOlympic bid, if you remember, if you wouldcall, Um baseball was trying tomake it bid and softball was trying to make IGS Pid as two separate sports, and so now that's changed. And now it'sbaseball it' softball. But I I just think that softball deserves its owndue, not comparison to baseball and baseball. Does its own thng, it'sSoltfull as its own thing, but like of course we can have Shar fans andrealize that there's you know shared abilities, but um that', THAT'S KINDOF! How I feel, Ithink, I think, softball's a very quick game and- and I know lot of people wholove it and not just girls, but around the world. Men play a lot of Faspaghyeah. It is important to mention that there's nothing against softball at all.It's just that girls and boys should be able to play either or whichever theyprefer. So, as you mentioned earlier, Justinein two thousand and nine, you became the first female coach of aprofessional men's baseball team. The brockedin rocks in the CanadianAmerican Association of Professional Baseball at that time. What was it like?Being the only woman on the coaching staff? It was rely difficult. You know,I think um it wouldn't mean it was amazing. Youget to go to work and put on a baseball, uniform and you S to stay N, a firstbasebox and games going on and you're in your partof it all and you get your baseball car and he interact with kids like Icouldnot be more grateful for that opportunity. Um, but as much as I wasready for the opportunity, meaning I've always been the only girl, they were the first team to have a awoman coach. So for I I would think collectively as a team. It was moredifficult for them to make an adjustment where it wasn't difficultfor me, because I was so used to it. So you know there was sufferringopinions as to whether or not I belonged on the team or not once you got there. Do you feel, likeyou proved to people that you did belong there? No, I think I think, hadyou know y. He had a group that thought it was great. I was there yet a groupwhe didn't care and he had a group who...

...really felt like you know. It was just wrong morally wrong to havea woman on a baseball field and acpacity there was. It was two thousand and nine.It was very different than today or when I was with the as doinginstructional as in two thousand and fifteen you just you were really work,it's only six years in between, but you were really working with like anothergeneration between those years. So once you become so you so your second,your second sort of Gig you're, again the first woman to throwbatting practice for an MLB team Um during spring training for theCleveland Indians, which is the team that you said that you wanted to playfor. How did that come about and how was that Experience Different From thecoaching experience in two thousand and nine again, you o I'm so grateful forthat coach experience and being an assistant, baseball, coach and, andthey getting t have a propportunity. Is You know a dream, but um I decided Iwanted to throw vadding practice. It was an idea I had in high school.Actually I watched I wa. I always went to pregame to watch what the teams did.That was always like the last one to leave and so on. Um- and I saw this guy come out to Moun athrow baing practice and how Wa to me, I thought he was old. Oh, it wasprobably like forty right, but when you're in high school at thought he wasthis old guy and I thought Ey. I can throw that. I can do that and so, whenI was thirty seven I thought. Oh, I should get on that dream and so econtacted all the major league teams, an ae I could throw to them and Um. Really one person got back to me andsaid Um that he believed in you know women doing anything he had daughtersand but that I couldn't go for his team and I was so excited ecause. I thought.Oh One person is red, my email then there's hope, and so that I I went tothe winter meetings and I um. I ended up meeting Joe Madden. I was introduced totoomatid and he said maybe and then my other friend Um Tim Brown, who was a sportswriter withYahoo. He introduced me to billy bean and he said the rays were going to. Letme throw be PN, would the as do so and billy bean took five seconds and saidyes, and it was truly one of those moments that wash over Yo, where yourealize you're, not crazy and your dream's going to come true. So I wentback to the Indians and said: Hey. Can I make history with you um and they said yes and I ended up goingto the Indians. It was during spring training. I Fon the age twice, one, theColosseum and and in Oakland A and it Wen training, and then I few to the metand the astros the rays and the cardinals and um I had my daughter Jazzin with me. Hiwas thirteen through it all and it was just an absolute dream. I mean like themovies. It was a lot of pressure to perform and I prepared myselfaccordingly but um to get all these mador th uniformsbeyond the field. You know thro against these major leaguers thatyou've beene reading about 'cause. I was still kind of like a fan back. Thenit was really it made always like everything he woulddream it to be. Welan, what a cool experience for your daughter to seethat her mom isn't taking no for an answer: She's going from team to teamto team just trying to make this happen, and you finally did make it happen, andyour daughter was there to see Um, I'm sure there have been many teachablemoments in your journey for your daughter, and that must be extremelyspecial for you. Yeah I mean, obviously...

...being with my daughter, is everything I had her in college. So I've had her.We've been together. In my whole adult life, and even when I was with theBrocken rocks Um, you know I would sometimes have to pull r out of school,because there was no one to watch her and then we get home at midnight andthen Kinda did the same thing. The next day I was always trying to scramble tofind solutions, but Um, I don't think, there's anything betterthan a mother daughter, baseball sort. No, absolutely not so. She playsbaseball. I'm assuming well she's twenty two now, but she played basebal till she was ten,but it wasn't her sport actually she's. Interestingly, nowgetting into it, but what she learned is that if you pursuewhat you're, after, if you're willing to give it everything you have, thenyour dream can come true, that your dream job is possible that you justhave to keep working. It's like what are you going to sacrifice, make thatjob happen and she learned that thats all possible. You know when people tellyou, you can't theres, there's the possibility that you canand UH. So she just grew up with that idea and she grew up without this anyLIK gender stereotypes that might confine her as she pursues Hor passions. I think that's, what's really coolabout her generation now, which which gives me a lot of hope for the futureUm just knowing that they grew up in a space where it is normal for women tosucceed, M, and I think that's really special, because I know thatgenerations before us. It was the exact opposite. So I'm hoping that you'reexperiencing the same thing, not only with your daughter but with kids, thatyou coach too well with the kids like coach, like the kids or the men, is ae very different experiences Um, but uh. You know I started baseball forall, which is a non profit for girls to play and coach and lead and Basefall,and I started because, just like I was told when I was thirteen, I should quitbaseball. Amazingly, there are still girls being told they should quit justbecause they're girls, so we um we're stopping that narrative. We're doingour part and we help community stark girls, baseball teams and we crkbaseball events for the girls to play with one another. Most of them stillplay with the boys, but for them to meet other girls who play is keepingthem in the game longer they no longer feel theyre alone. Sothe cool thing that I think about your non profit baseball for all. Youstarted this when you were very young, you were what just twenty three whenyou started this yeah. When I had my daughter Jasmine, I just thought if shewants to play, I want to give her a better opportunity. I was tired ofwaiting for those opportunities and, if you wanted to play, I didn't want toifface the discrimination that I faced, so I actually started as a fourteenwoman's league for a year. You know that wasn't the answer that Itried to send my pro team I put together against men and that wasn'tthe answer. Then I felt you know what would I have loved as a kid and that is to play with other girls to to not feellike I'm the only girl out there do not feel alone but to feel part of thecommunity and that eventually, you know, became baseball for all which is now. You can look around and see fivehundred girls playing baseball from age, eight to eighteen in ctimose,nine out of twenty two year C players work came out of our program, so ourgirls really have role models everywhere. They look when they come toour programs. That's amazing! As of...

...right now, there are really only ahandful of female coaches in Pro Sports, but we've seen growth over the past fewyears. What do you think the future will look like in terms of womengetting more opportunities like that? I think. First of all, I thought it waskind of funny that you said only that there's only I swent so many years as b one you knowlike hitting my head against the wall, trying to get an opportunity and takingany opportunit Y. I could whether it was a good one or or you know whetherit's two weeks or you know three days I I would take anything. I could try tocontinue to pursue my passion, but at the same time break a barrier. So it's very exciting to see the amountof women that are coaching right now. I think that with analytics and EPISOM biomechanicstheres, you know you can go ahead N and get a jobcoaching. I don't think it matters if you're a man or a woman, I think youhave to go and become overqualified still. I think that will be for a longtime, but it's it's now real. You can look at Rachel backabic withwith the Indians, not the Indians, the Yankees and she went and did a driveline. N Internship. You know she first started with Ha team in strength andconditioning she taught herself Spanish, like it's. It's go get over qualified B, but it's alsoa real possibility. You don't have to bang as much against the wall andwonder now. You know it's possible. Did you and I'm sure you've experiencedthis multiple times m? Unfortunately, but I guess I'm just trying to learn onceyou were part of a baseball organization. As the onlywoman as the first woman, there, people obviously questioned you and yourability because of your gender. But aside from that, were there were peoplediscounting you because of other things, or was it just? They saw. You werefemale and you didn't really have a chance to prove yourself because ofthat sure. So my college days o Springfieldcollge. It was not an issue that I was a woman. It was different, but once Iproved I knew what I was doing. I was very well accepted and my other pro opportunities with theas at the instructs. I did some independent ball. I was in Aficathe,Mblee, Campin and n some other things Um. I would say that that I didn't have anytroubles, so it was like just a new generation of of young men who wereused to having women as athletic trainers. They were used to competingagainst women in their high schools and so on so yeah. I still had a proof thatI knew what I was doing, but they were, they were open to having a coach who could helpthem verses, sort of like the sparoy. She can't possibly help me becauseshe's, a woman, Um Werds I've always considered being a woman like anothertool in my tool box to help people um. So I things have just changed over timeand I've been really accepted and I have very few like stories of where I haven't been Um.I have plenty of like where I wasn't able to get opportunities, but when Iwas accepted on the team, then I was with team Israeli semental performance,coach and and actually ended up coaching in a Dogout, an uniform. Youknow, I can't tell you any time where I was't treated with respect. Well,that's good to hear Um. We definitely have a long way to go in terms of morewomen being a part of pro sports, but I feel like as as we progress as theyears go on, it gets a little bit easier and we probably have you tothank for paving the way when you first...

...got started, incoaching in baseball and we're dealing with this today now morethan ever, um in more ways than one really. How do you think we can work toovercome societal norms to promote equality? I mean you, you deal withthis every single day in sports or in baseball general. I think yeah. I guessin Sports. I don't know it's it's it's a hard question because we're in a veryinteresting trying time right now on multiple fronts- and you know, you've worked really hard toovercome societal norms, specifically in baseball being a female m justworking to promote equality. So is there a secret recipe to overcomingthat and and to continue um on that fight, something that we can practicedaily? That's a really good question and verydifficult question. Um. I can tell you that you can't do it alone that yeah you have to make friends. Youhave to rely on people Um for opportunities as well as for support.So even when I, for example, through batting practiceand got to meet Whith,Jom, adden and Billy Bean. Well, that only happened because a year earlier Iwent to winter meetings just tho network, and when I went networked, Imade friends for the whole year we talked and then the next time I sawthem they were able to use their connections to help me. I think that the way women are higher,particularly in sports or pro sports, it can't be the same checklist as asthey have potentially for men. For example Um. I don't know a woman who's played D onbaseball, but I do know you know a woman who got a masters or PhD NBiomechanics, so you have to kind of start to think outside the traditionalbox, not because I don't want to say I'm not trying tocompare men or women. I just think it's time to look outside the traditionalbox of a check lists where w we just kind of have the old boys club and thiss what we've always looked for and the people we hire and now look beyond thatM. I know that as a female in baseball, I actually get a lot of people come andask me Questos a lot of players come and ask me questions it's like being afemale with my experience and the bi. By give, is he comeas to Steen forhealth? You know like they're, not conquorable asking. There are othercoaches who have Ma have played in the major leagues, so I've have had hittingquestions to H, girlfriend questions, Kno Nigini it I've gotten it because peopleare very comfortable with me. They really respect the path that I' taken,and I think that's true for all women, no matter where they go f. If you'reworking hard enough and you're authentic an and you can get thoseallies around you, people are going to respect you there'll always be someenewho says something awful a in your day, but that doesn't have to be the norm.You know, I don't even think that is the norm anymore. I think there's a lotof men who now have daughters and they want their daughters to like be able to do anything they want. Ithink a lot of men have kind of woken up, instad could be said yeah, and I think it's reallyinteresting. You pointed out that players would go to you to ask specificquestions because they were either too embarrassed or for whatever reason,didn't feel comfortable asking another mal coach and that's another way thatgender plays a role. It really so many different industries being a woman. Youyou have this like motherly, I don't even want to call it an instinct. It'sjust like. Sometimes guys want to talk...

...to girls about specific things. Theythey know that women have a different way of thinking than men and that couldbe really advantageous to have females in in every department M in a baseballorganization, in a PR in any professional sport, and I think thatpeople are starting to understand that and realize that that's actually abenefit for their players. Yeah I mean I'm, I'm big Yosay diversity on a staffmatters. You know the more diverse you have the more chances you have onreaching people from where, where they are, where they came from the peoplethat they're used to to being around Um. So some people are very some people.Some players don't have healthy relationships with men in their lives right and someare very close to their mothers and some aren't and that's not an issue atall, but they liked that this guy came from the same town t they did or thatthey struggled growing up. You know so I just feel like you have to havepeople speak Spanish. You have to have people with all different brackgrounds. If youwant to meet every player where they are and if you can meet them, then youcan win. You know you can come together and win, so it it's being a woman. It's for me.It's being a woman. I also have a PhD in sport psychology. You know, so I would say that they know that timesI'm called DOC. You know someone will decide to call me doc Um, but it is. It is very. It was veryinteresting me, the first time with the as when I had a player come to me withhis hitting question. No, my background's pitching, but he gained tome with his hitting question and did not talk to the other guys who hadplayed in the major leagues, the other coaches, and I was like this is exactlywhat I thought could happen. If you have a woman on a staff- and I I don'tunderstand why you would, you would run a team without a female and stuff. It'sjust another way to reach your absolutely you treated this recentlyand I love it. You asked what is some of the best life advice you've receivedfrom a coach, so I want to ask how you would answer that question. I askedthat question. I didn't even think about it. Like myself, I couldn't comeup with an answer. I think. For me it was mainly actions. You know whether itwas a coash who supported me or didn't, and so my advice is to watch what yourcoaches do see, how they treat people see how they treat their families, seehow they treat their time Um, because you want to know who you're, modeling and and M. I think you can learn a lotby watching people's actions versus to sort of hearing what they're saying soas a coach. What sort of life life lessons? Do you try to teach yourplayers 'cause? There are a lot, especially as it relates to baseball. Ithink that don't give up, I think Thats Jus, a big one, don'tgive up if follow your passions and if you it may not turn out H, exact whay,you thought it would. But if you follow your passions, you can't go wrong. What do you think it takes to be agreat leader, empathy? I think great leaders have empathy and the ability tolisten or desire to listen, Uto somability, but a desire to listen andlearn and serve. You know always welling always willing to say. I may havegotten that wrong, but here's how we can do it together. That's huge andsometimes having empathy is not the easiest. You almost have to learn howto even imagine yourself being in someone else's position to then knowhow to help them, how to listen, how to learn from them. So I I agree with you,I think, being ampathetic is extremely important, especially if you're in aleadership position. So for those who are maybe considering getting intocoaching really of any kind 'cause. I think that this advice could apply toany industry, any kind of coaching.

What advice do you have for someone whowants to be a coach? If you want a coach, I would get a degree. We get a degree in M biomechanics, UH, analytics, Um Psychology, even a sportpsychology. I mean anything. That's going to help you. You K W you kind offigure out what it's going to be. What's kind o your thing. Are you goingto be an expert in movement? Are you going to be expert relating to peopleand pretty good at movement Um, because that's kind of what I think you shouldget your background in if Om, an education standpoint and then juststart coaching to just coach whether you have to start, you know your youthlevels to Um carring, the water jug at a college level or community collegeand just be willing to keep going Um find out who ar your your coachaffiliations like for us, like the ABCA's, huge gigantic baseballconvention, and I know we have a lot of softball coaches who have started tocome over and do that. You know that's a time to network. That's a time tolearn everything you can um, but at least three times a week. Istart my morning just watching videos pitching videos of someone else,someone else teaching how to Pich I've got a notebook m. You know where I'mtaking notes, so I can just c constantly be better. You know. So ifyou want a coach, no task is too small. You know bewilling to build your your way up and Um and again just don't say no. Youknow when I went to my college and I want to pea coach. Iwas originally denied, and so I went to college across town and they gave methe job and th. When the first college found out that I had got, you know Iactually had moved to go to Springfield they're like oh well, we'd love to haveyou conk coach, her you know. So sometimes you have to somehimes. Youcan't necessarily go through the wall, but you could find a way to go aroundit or to bend it or you know what I mean it's it's not always a straightanswer, so you have to be creative and would think that's true, not just incoaching but in any job that you're going to pursue yeah, definitely and not not taking thenose as if to be a sign that you're not supposed to do this. There are waysaround the nose. You just need to find one. Yes, you just need one opportunityto get in the door and and see what you can do. So I think that's important too,that you you've mentioned that a couple of times too just there are going to benose. So at least as long as you know that heading into it, then you can, youcan find ways around it. There's also. I just want to to say there's a lot ofwonderful man out there who want to help um and of course, there's morewomen gain an places of positions of power to hire ut. There's a lot ofwonderful men, wha woe'd like to help. So if you don't ask you can't get a yes-and I know you've heard that before, but it's completely true when you'repursuing your goals and your dreams, it is true it it's hard because sports in in most all aspects of sports,whether it's broadcasting like what I've experienced in or or coaching R orplaying, we all kind of look at it as a boys club, because that's that's whatit's been, but I'm glad you pointed that out because in all facets of ofsports there are great men who are willing to be allies for women who arewilling to give us opportunities and it's important to recognize them,because we wouldn't be able to do what we're doing without them. So I'm gladthat you brought that up. We spoke about baseball for all a couple timesthroughout this episode and I just want to learn more about it. So you startedthis years ago. You now have tournaments, and you said five hundredgirls participate in this M. Tell me...

...about this organization. Well, we runprogramming nationally. Essentially, we create awareness thatgirls are playing baseball Um. So if you go to our instagram or ttwitter, you know you're just going to see stories about girls playing justbecause, as you mentioned dearly, a lot of people think that girls playsoftball only, but we want people to know that girls m also play baseball,but we also want the girls themselves. You know we're very much a leadershiporganization. We tell the girls are never too young to be leaders and thatwe expect them to come back and give back, and so we can have fifteen yearolds, teaching ten year olds and nineteen year olds coming back andhelping run all of our events Um, because we wanted girls to know thatthey're perfect as they are, and they don't need to fit into a box Um, because so many times they grow up.Tust say why, when are you going to switch girls? Don't do this when youknow wh? When are you going to do the right thing and we want to tell thatthey're already doing the right thing, they're already being who they are andand following you know, what's inside in their hearts? So that's reallyimportant to us that girls know who they are know that they're believed in and we D use baseball to teach thoselessons, and so we have events and UM programs around the country, we'realways trying to grow so to grow. All we need as a volunteer to say, Hey I'll,lead this area n this in this state and Um, and then we could teach her how tofind the girls to put programming together and given the challenges youhad playing baseball as a young girl. How special is it for you to be able togive back and help these young girls have a space to play, a space that youdidn't really have? First, I'm jealous. They know all these friends and youknow you watch th Gras and you know now all their baseball teammates are alsoat the birthday ar ND xactly. How I wanted it. That was exactly what it'sabout. Um, so it's it's very feeling to be able toto help the next generation and to help these girls Um, and it's it's just such an honor, apart of their lives and a part of their journey. Well, I hope you know howimpactful your work is, because it is really amazing that these young girlshave an opportunity to play. So I hope that you realize how important yourwork is before I let you go justine. Can you leave us with a woman in sportswho inspires you? I would say right now: BILLY IANVILLIGAN, King T's, obviouslya leader Ti'm, always inspired and anytime. She like likes one of mytweets. I always get really excited and tell everyone there's just what I wish is that g.There are so many incredible women in and out of Sports, and I wish I hadgrown up knowing about them and I think it's it's fantastic thatwe're starting to celebrate all the women womean accomplishments in general,because growing up, I didn't know there were all these bad ass women doing allthese incredible things. I just kept writing reading. You know textbooksthat that featured men, and so it's reallyexciting to see see girls growing up with so manyfemale role models ECAUSE, I didn't have any growing up, and so it s it'svery exciting to me, and it means everything really M, as we move forward.Definitely well, thank you for the work that you're doing for young girls andfor women who look up to you um what you're doing what you have done, whatyou're doing and what you'r you will continue to do really is amazing. Sothank you and thank you for your time. I really appreciate you taking sometime out of your day to talk to me. I know that there weresome upcomingtournaments for baseball for all that had to be cancelled because of thepandemic, so I hope that that gets to...

...resume quickly for you and for all ofyour girls. Thank you and you can learn more: a baseball for all DOT COM or bimeonto it or just seem baseball. When e could continue the jet, I'm so glad that justine took herexperiences as a child to fuel her as an adult. Otherwise, she never wouldhave made history. She never would have felt compelled to get back and cread anorganization for girls to play, baseball and learn that they belong.She never would have inspired women everywhere, who have been told nobecause of their gender, so justine. Thank you so much for the work thatyou're doing you can follow, along with Justine's journey onto it, or atjusting, baseball and Justine seagul on Instagram, and to learn more aboutbaseball for all, go to baseball for all docom and don't forget if you wantto wake up to new episodes of this show in your inbox, each and every Thursdaymorning head to my website to subscribe, and so she goes pod dotcom thanks forlistening.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (43)