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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 16 · 1 year ago

15. Whitney Holtzman, CEO & Founder, Social Victories

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

After holding impressive roles as a reporter for ESPNW, a Social Media Producer for the MLB, and working as an Account Manager for VaynerMedia, she set out to carve her own path. Soon after making that leap, she booked her first client and created "Social Victories". Almost 3 years in, she's helped multiple professional athletes create a second career for themselves, and she's even written a book about her journey. 

O conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes. Here's your host, Amanda Morgis, Tey theare things for tuning in there'sa lot going on right now. So I appreciate you taking the time to learnabout an awesome woman who is doing amazing things in the sports world. Ifthis is your first time listening to, and so she goes welcome, I'm a sportsjournalist, who's covered multiple sports in multiple cities, and I've metsome pretty incredible women in Sports, and I also look up to others who I'venever met. So I pread in this pace to share their stories, so I startedsomething new last week and I'm going to keep it up. I'm highlighting a womanwho realized a problem wanted to do something about it, and so she found asolution this week, the N, so she goes award, goes to Franci Gerard founderand CEO of a clothing brand called the sixes. Franci was five ten by the timeshe was in fifth grade and she struggled her whole life to findclothes that fit her, and so she created a cloting company serving womenwho are five, nine and taller by the way she was pretty well equipped tostart her own company. She played professional volleyball and got her MBAfrom Harvard t brand just launched in twenty nineteen, and if you want tosupport a bad ass, black owned fashion brand, you can find her on instregramat the sixes and y see now for my guest this week. Whitney Holsman is acourageous ambassador for being your truest self. She just recently wrote abook and she's. The CEO and founder of social victories, a social mediamarketing firm that provides so much more than Insteram helpd for herclients. In this episode we dive into why she decided to go out on her ownhow she helps her clients find success off the field which is way moreimportant for professional athletes than you might think, and what it takesto carve your own path and live a life. That's fulfilling here is my chat withCEO and Authur Whitneyholsman: Hey Whitney. How are you I'm doing?Well, Amanda, I'm so excited to be on your pocast. I feel so lucky to be ableto talk to you and to join the elite group of gas that you've had on so farin in launching this podguest, oh you're, very sweet. I appreciate yourtime. I know that it's been very busy for multiple reasons for all of us,including you so there's a lot to get to, but first of all you just publishedyour first book so cangrass on becoming a published author. That's amazing, canyou tell us a little bit about? You? Are the first you yeah absolutely well!Thank you for the kind words and there's certainly nothing likepublishing your first book during a piandemic. I think I already have thematerial for the second book after this experience right, but I first of file.I was never someone that I thought would write a book. I just assumed thatonly happened to really famous people, and I hope what my experience canthowcase is that anyone can be an author and everyone has a really interestinglife story and if you don't think so, you're probably asking the wrongquestions and you don't have to be at the end of your life, to write a book.I'm about to turn thirty three in my first book and my journey up until thispoint is already out there. So I was really passionate about selecting thatparticular title, because my book really encompasses my own career journey and I think a lotof life. I went through school and just my childhood kind of feeling, like Iwasn't great at anything and I didn't really blend in with most other people.You kind of feel a little bit alone, and I realize that I was meant to carbout my own path. I wasn't meant to fit in with other groups of people. I wasreally the first me and I didn't really have that realization until I ended uphaving some success in my career and I kind of found my groove, and not onlydoes it Crodiste book chronicle my career, Jo journey through the SportsWorld and tells me the stories of how I got my jobs and internships, and I hopeit inspires people to live the life that they were meant for. But I also want people to be able to chase chase their dreams andto realize that the things that may seem impossible to you right now arepossible, and I wanted to show the ups and downs of my life so that they wereable to see what it was like and to have a relatable journey while theyreght and chase their own dreams. That's incredible, and I think it'sreally it's really important that you pointed out that you don't need to beany particular person to write a book 'cause. I think a lot of people look upto authors as these people who have...

...this incredible story to tell and theydo but but really we KI. We kind of all do so. What was the publishing process?Like I mean you, you said you weren't, reallysomeone that thought. You would write a book and then now here you are o. Howdid that come about yeah absolutely, and I think you know I will say theother component of my book is that it contains all the lessons that I thinkyou need to know in life and in business, but that no one had evertaught me in school. I had to learn them the hard way throughout my careerjourney, and I wanted people to have all the important lessons that I thinkyou need to know in one place so that they could pick up the book andhopefully that would streamline their own journey and t y. They wouldn't haveto learn those lessons, the way that I did and they could learn them muchfaster. But essentially I was just chronicling M, all that I was doingafter I I launched my own business and want full time with it and January oftwo thousand and eighteen and I would put out content on Lindin an instrogramjust sharing the different initiatives that I was participating in and thepolishing company happened to see the stuff that I was doing unlinked in someof the speeches that I was giving and they sent me a note and said: Have youever thought of writing a book which I I sort of laughed at like absolutelynow? Like was Hus me message, men for someone else and they they. Basically after the initialmessage they sent me. I hopped on a call with the main contact there and wehad a conversation and then I talked to the CEO of the company and I think it'sreally important to partner with people who make you feel like. You can be ahundred and percent yourself, and that is a feeling. I look for inpartnerships, and I had that when I talked to both of them and everythingjust went very smoothly and they had me ultimately put together an outlinewhich they said please put together. One page outline and mind ended upbeing about twelve and they said well the gonuses at least half the bookswritten now and then it went before a vote and I remember itwas the Thursday before Memorial Day in two thousand and nineteen, and theywere going into their meeting at about five thirty at night, and so I expectedto hear within the hour and by nine pm I hadn't heard anything. So I thought.Well, I guess you know this wasn't meant to be, and it was silly to thinkthat I was someone who would write a book and man about an hour later roundten pm, they called me and said the vote was unanimous to bring you on asan author. So then it was like. Well, I guess I'm writing a book now and Ithinkther e, no n for anyone who's interested in writing a book havingthat outline ahead of time really helped a lot, because you start to getnervous about what am I going to put in this chapter, or am I going to forget what I wanted tosay t this particular journey in my life and having that outline to ladderback to kind of put me at ease and and really helped guide me, and I had toturn in a chapter a week during the book writing process so pretty muchfrom June to October. I didn't really go outside, because I would we wouldedit the previous chapter on Monday and Tuesday Bo back and forth with theeditor and then Wednesday. I would start the new chapter and it had to beturned in by Sunday at midnight and you're talking about a whole part ofyour life and so to fit that in in four days, was, was certainly a challenge.But I was really invigorated by the process and I think it was an importantlesson to when something is meant to be, to kind of trust that it will work out gosh that is seriously so inspiring forthose of us who want to read it. Where can we buy it Owell? Thank you. Iappreciate it. So it's currently on Amazone. If you type in you, are thefirst you and my name whitneholdsmen. It should pop right up and it's on,prime, so I can be at your doorstep. The next day there's also a be book orkindelversion as well on Amazon. So I would say: That's the best spot allright. Well, I'm going to go order it. Thank you. No way can't wait to hearwhat you think and yeah. I think when I just looked around at what was outthere and thinking about my own journey, I came from a very supportive family,but I had to have tunnel vision to go after what I was meant for and no oneelse around me really felt like they understood who exactly who I was, andthey don't only tell you in school. You can start your own business and createa pass for yourself. Those for things again. I had to learn the hard way andI wanted people to read it and to realize that there's just such pressureto do what everyone else around you is doing and do what may please the peoplethat you're closest to, and I really wanted to put something out there thatshowed that no one has been you before. So no one knows, what's in your gut andthe right decisions more than you, I want us to as a society to start makingdecisions for our own lives and our own happiness, not for those around us. Well. I also want to thank you forbeing brave enough to even put that out into the world, because writing a bookis scary, like you have no idea what people are going to think you don'tknow if anyone's going to buy it or read it, and even though it' it's notabout the money or even the recognition. But you know you want to share yourstory and you have a purpose Um for...

...sharing your story and it's just ascary thing. So I applaud you for being brave Um and this kind of segwaysperfectly you mentione, you know carving your own path and starting yourown business. That's exactly what you did M and we're going to talk aboutthat. The meat and potatoes of what you do is social media and to talk about the state of our country.Right now. Social media has been so interesting right now, it's just crazyhow it's become so much more than sharing vacation photos and promotingyour career and what it has been for the past handful of years. I mean whatwe've seen now through multiple social platforms is that things can be sharedto inspire actual change to show case the world in a way that makes us thinkand makes us grow, and this is something that you have to payattention to on a daily basis, because this is what your business is. Yeahabsolutely M. Well, I think before we had the protests in the black ladesmatter movement, we had corona virus, and so it's been a number of things ina row that have been really interesting and unprecedented for both me and myclients. Yeah, I mean it's so crazy because no one knows howto deal with this, because we've never experienced anything like this beforeUm. So I do want to talk about how you'vebeen giving advice, Toyour, clients, let's give a little bit of background.First, you have your own social marketing, consulting firm, calledsocial victories, so you basically serve as the chief marketing officerfor professional athletes. Um. How have you I want to get into how youstarted, but first, let's stay on this topic: Th the pandemic Um. Now you knowwe're dealing with the blacklives matter: Movement M. What what kind ofconversations are you having with your clients in terms of how you are helpingto guide their presencs online during a time like this sure? Well, I think what I really keep in mind is that Ihave a true partnership with my clients. I care about them like family, and Ialways say that they are my champions and I think for everyone, it'simportant to find champions in life who open doors that you can't and when itcomes to business or helping them build their brands or working on marketing.They defer to me when it comes to how they feel about the black lives mattermovement. I really need to take a back seat and listen to what they feel onthe issue and listen to their perspective. So one of my clients, whowas on the bucks and Rams we have our own podcast, called energy captains andwe're recording an episode. This upcoming Lee just about how he feelsabout this entire movement, and it's been really interesting, becausethey've also asked me what I thought about. What's going on, and I thinkthat we look at the country, D, e watch, the news and there's so much divide andpersonally, I've been superappreciative that my clients and I have really beenon the same page and I think more than anything, I just wanted to make surethey were Oky during these times and to see how they were feeling. And if therewas anything I could do to help it's really about them and me being asupport system. However, I can do that yeah, it's really important to be aleader, obviously, for you at any point, because you have your own business andyou have clients that look to you for guidance, but during a time like this,I think it's important for a lot of us to sit back and consider how otherpeople are feeling and sort of assess our own belief,system and kind of see how understand how we can best support theblack community. Whether that's you know our friends, our neighbors orecolleagues coworkers thelist goes on. I think it's been an extremely importantlearning experience for me, and I've had to have some uncomfortable, realconversations, which I'm actually thankful for and Um for. Someone like you, it's interesting,because your clients need your assistance. Yet in times likethis, you ere leaning on them for guidance as well. So it really is arelationship yeah, absolutely, and I think for me. Ifeel incredibly grateful that M in two thousand and sixteen for a year Iworked for an organization called rise, the rots initiative in sports forequality founded by SIMEROSS, who owns the Miami Dolphins, and we have thecommissioner of every sports league in the head of every TV network on ourboard, and our mission was to eradicate races up so before this whole thinghappened. I spent a year working in this space and when this all hit, Ifelt very grateful that ahead of this curve, I had done the work, because Ithink then you're able to show case that it really is part of your heartyou're, not just jumping into a social...

...mediatrend, and I also had an educationabout what works or what is hopeful to heal. In these times that I was able toshow my clients, hey. I have already worked in this space. I care so much.These are the things I learned about. I had my own talking points that I hadbeen educated on, because I had taken the time to accept a job in this space.Already I like that, you use the word trend, because that's the biggest thingright now, I I mean you, you work in social media. Iyou know sort of do but not really Um. I I just want to encourage people tonot treat this as a trend Um in one of in my last paast episode with my friendKimberly Martin, who works for e SPN. She she was expressing her frustrationabout how these topics aren't new and the black community is, is reallyfrustrated that that we're treating these topics as if they're new andtrends are huge and social media, where one person posts something and it goesbyral and everyone else is like oh well. I need to do that too. You know, I wantpeople to see that I'm jumping on that trend too, and I guess like in yourworld trends, are really important, but but right now is is not a time to focuson being trendy yeah, that's very important, and Ithink, as I've seen the past couple of weeks on unfold, it's really easy forpeople to pust something on social media or to jump on and share theiropinion. But more than anything I want them to really mean it. That's whatmatters the most and when I was at rise, one of the biggest takeways, if not themost important takeaway from the issues we worked on, was that there are a lotof people that want to be right. When something is in the news, they want tobe right and they want to be a part of it and they want to have their voiceheard and it's not to say necessarily that they don't mean it. But we don'tget very far just talking about what side of an issue you're on it's so muchmore powerful. If we all come together and unify to create solutions, we canall agree that this is an issue, no matter what side you're on and if wespend our time and energy working with the other side and listening and hahaving empathy to create solutions. And I can talk about some of the specificthings we did at rise. But I think that's just so much m of a better useof our time and people get caught up in sharing their opinion and wanting tojump in the conversation and thinking that's enough. But we're going to be somuch better off if people instead putting the work to create solutions.What are you actually doing to help this issue and I think that really helps kind of weed out somepeople. But it's just an interesting perspective, Tor interesting questionfor people to ask themselves because until that concept was introduced to me,I wasn't really thinking about it. 'cause, it's just so easy and natural,especially in the age of social media, for people to just share what theythink and that doesn't really accomplish anything right exactly it's.It's helpful to use your voice to show support, but also you need to bewilling to do the work outside of social media. Okay, that's absolutelyright! Yep! So, let's move on to your business. You R, the CEO, which isawesome to say, but you didn't ow O, have your own business, so give us alittle bit of your background and, let's start with your first job out ofcollege yeah. Absolutely into that point. I remember I went back to speakto a high school class and a kid raiced his hand and said well. Have you alwaysbeen entreprernaurial, I'm like by the way they don't call it call it thatuntil it works when everyone else is going left and you're growing right,you're looked at as a screw up and that's why it's so important that youhave to believe in yourself and the decisions you're making, because youmay not get that outside support or satisfaction right away. It wasn'tuntil many years later that people have called it really nice things. So I wantpeople to be reassured that you know it takes some time for, for it all to payoff, but um I so. I grew up in Tampa Florida and I know you're from theretoo, which I'm Sol pumped about yes and I went to h University of Florida an tobacktrack a little bit when I was growing up. My mom used to havemeetings on Monday nights and she said to my da ICATES, the one night of theweek that you're in charge of putting the kids to bed and she'd come homeevery Monday night and he'd have my brother and I, under each of his armsand we'd, be watching Monday night football. So football was ingrained inme from an early age, we went to Bucx Games growing up and I would come homefrom school and all I wanted to do was watch sports and it was the only thingI could say I loved. So I knew I liked sports and people, and so I said, okay,what Jodbes do I know about to combine both of those- and I said well I'll- bethe sideline reporter. On Monday night football and my parent said: could youpick a job with more than one opening and I said well sure I'l I'll do Sunday nightfootball? Also. So now I just doubled my option, so they probably wereTerrifiedandan thought they'd have to support me for the rest of my life, butI think it's an important lesson to pick a north star. That was the contextI had at the time I was in high school...

...going into college and at that pointsocial media hadn't been invented. So I didn't know it could be a job and Ithink for kids in high school now we're growing up your job may not be aroundyet so just trust in your path and an PIC. What you know that you like themost and go afhter and see what comes your way and then I went to Universityof Florida, where I had internships with the Rayse Turner, sports and ESPN.So I guess an intership could be considered a first job and then rightout of college. I started working with t e spw ther, women's Iditiative, so social media not really a thing incollege. I relate to that as well. Um, at what point did you learn to love social media and look atit as of business? Yes, I think passion has always drivenmy life. I just think that life is really short. That is something I'veknown from a young age, and I talk about this a little in my book, but Ilost a lot of close relatives really early on from middle school to highschool and it totally refraimed my whole perspective in life. I couldn'tsweat the small stuff anymore. I realized that life was precious and Ijust didn't want to settle for anything that didn't make me happy. So it wasimportant to me to do what I loved and I realized, is inmy first job out of college- that on the side I was tweeding about sportsfor fun like that was something that I just loved doing and, IncidentallyEnough I happen to stumble across a posting on Craig's list, for an openingto be the social media coordinator and Major League Baseball, and when I sawit, I thought I can't believe someone's willing to pay me for this. This iswhat I do for fun, so that that that passion has kind ofdriven all the business decisions I've made in my life. So that being said, I think a lot ofpeople have feelings like that. Where they're like, I know what I want to do,I I want to you know, be the one that's steering my future ont to being control,but not everyone has the nerve to jump off the cliff by themselves. So, atwhat point did you make the decision to not work for someone else, but insteadcreate your own business yet so it was a process, and I thinkthat when I hear a lot of people tell their stories about starting Ounbusinesses, it's some happy go lucky story of every all that stars talineand I just went forn. It sounds like crossing the finish line of a marathonwhich I've never done and probably never will. But I mean that's how t Iwould assume that death the same you for you haven't, and my storey was verydifferent. I think, as my career journey went along, my prioritiescompletely changed, so I started out wanting to go after the big name.Companies and that to me at the time was successbecause I think they sounded really good to other people, and then Irealized pretty quickly that I was living life for other people and notfor myself. So I started as time went on kind of tuning out the outside worldand listening to what my heart wanted the most at each turn- and I think,what's important and especially is coincidental that my book came outduring a Piandomac, because I talk a lot about transition times and thatthey happen to everyone in the bad moments and my careers story and prettymuch everyone else's life story has has a lot of down moments as well. It's notjust a highlight reel and I think it's important for people to understandthey're, not alone when they go through those and transition periods do end,and so, as I hade gone through four or five jobs, I started to realize thatwhat I wanted the most was to live back in Tampa N and be near my family andsee them, because I wanted as many moments with them in life as possible,and I wanted to do the work I loved, but I wanted to be able to create myown schedule and I think the constant theme that I kept having in the jobsthat I was at was that I loved what I did. I had success. I there weredifferent parts of each company that I really really enjoy, but I was missingthe independence and the ability to fly, and I think I I really didn't likeworking under buses. I had a lot of bosses that my gir managed and I didn'tfeel like I could breathe or be myself. It was suffocating. I'm someone who mywork is part of my soul and I found that there were a lot of days that werenet negative and I just decided after my last job that this theme seemed tobe consistent and what would happen if I were my own boss, and so I wrote downthe things that I wanted the most in life and you know I listed them outpreviously. But when I looked at the list it was really the only option withstarting your own company. So I thought well, why don't? I just give it a shotand if it doesn't work out, corporate Americais always going to be there. Butthis is the time to try. So I decided to take the leap of faith which I'mlike security, so was very outside my nature and very scary, but I think Ijust figure that not giving it a shot and alwayswondering what, if was more detrimental...

...to me than giving it a try, and therewas always going to be another job out there. If it didn't work out. It's sointeresting. You use that what, if sentiment, because I I feel the sameway, but some people are the opposite, where they would rather think what, ifthan to jump and fail, and I think that it's it's really important to realizethat for yourself like it's okay, if, if you don't want to make that jumpbecause you're too scared that that's fine like you can stay comfortablewherever you are and you'll probably be fine, there's nothing wrong with beingthat way. But it's really important for someone like you to to honor, what'sbeen on your heart for so long and to make that jump, because you wouldregret having to look back and think hm what,if I had gone out on my own yeah, absolutely, and I think more thananything I learned from my previous jobs that I wanted to fill my days withonly good things and good people. I think that is ultimate happiness and Iwasn't going to have that control unless I was in charge. So, let's getinto the logistics. If I can speak correctly, it's awesome that you wanted to startyour own business. That's great, but there's a lot of work that goes intothat. There are a lot of specific details that I'm sure a lot of people don't know about and maybe have nevereven considered so walk me through when you got your first client sort. So Idecided and again everyone has to make decisions for what they feels best forthemselves. But for me I didn't want to spend any money until I made money. Youhear a lot about COMPANI starting out and to have investors and seed money,and I think that can work for a lot of people, but I also want people to knowthat you don't necessarily need funding to start your own business. I justcommitted to being conservative. So when I decided to start my own company,the first things I did were to waunch my lanch o social media channelscompletely free and I wanted to make sure the company name was availableacross all channels. So I first grabbed those handles and then luckily by thegrace of God, my Dad Steve Oltsman, who shod out to him as a business lawyerand he helped me get the paper were in place and up and running and have mefilled out everything that I needed to fill out to officially launch the business and have it beofficial. So that was something I didn't even know you had to do, but I'dlearned from him that that is really the first part of the process. So if hewas able to help me out for that, and then I happened to be sitting at alunch and a friend said: Hey, my husband is: is looking for somesocial media help that his sports agency would you come in and share someof the advice that that you tend to give out to the different people youwork wish. So I said no problem. I was really help helping out a friend'shusband when I was in there. They one of their clients is Phil Mickelson andthey said well. Do you think you could put together a strategy of what youwould do for him so that we could see it, and I said well, no problem. I havemy own business, so that's when I went home and officially launched everythingand made the business a reality, and so that way everything was set up when Iwas doing work for them, and that was my very first plient and I think,what's important about my story. Is that when you are in a certain role,but you work for another company, people see you as being an extension ofthat company. You know I was whitme and I worked for E, SP and or major leaguebaseball. Whatever company it was when you have your own company people lookat you in a ned light and they don't they're, not necessarily going to thinkof opportunities for you until theyas the expert in the space and see withsomeone who is now on their own. So there were a lot of people out therethat needed my help and wanted it, but never thought to approach me because Iwas tied to another company, but as soon as I was back on the market orfree agent or R er able to take on clients, people then saw me as someonethey could hire. So I think that perception is really important thatpeople aren't necessarily going to knock UNDOUR door. If they see you ahundred percent tied to another company. That's so interesting! I've neverthought of that, because I think a lot of times you think youwill get opportunities based on the company you work for when reality like.Sometimes you just need to look inward and and know that you have what ittakes to do the work. You don't need the title from Xas Company to besuccessful. You know you can do it on your own yeah and I think that's whatthat exact sentiment is is what I've told people ind my biggest realizationsince going out on my own. The reason I spent so much time in other companiesand I'm grateful for that experience. Every chapter was worthwhile, but Ithought I had to be tied to a company to do the type of work I wanted to doand to do what I loved I, I never really thought I was capableof doing it oown, because a lot of...

...times those environments or bosseswould tear me down, and then, when I had my first Clim my first couple oftlines people, starten loving my work and they were very appreciative andthey thought it was great an I was like. Oh maybe I am capable of of doing thison my own, and I had a moment last year where I was walking into th, the Dolphin Stadium Hart RockStadium, and I I had two clients on the jets and the dolphins were playing thejets that day- and I remember thinking walking into the stadium that, on thebiggest stage I have two clients that are my own. It's not me being tied toan organization that represents them. I did this all by myself, and here I amworking with clients, doing it more of what I wanted to do than I had donewith any other company, and I made that happen just with me and by myself. Whatafilling feeling? That's! That's truly amazing. I I do want to get into thatwork that you do for your athletes. Your services are incredibly valuableto them off the field, but it's interesting because they have a careeron the field, so you have to find ways to showcase them off the field and alsoprepare them for, what's after football or what's after the sports, they're,currently playing right, yeah, absolutely younailed it, and I thinkyou K O when I wen. When I started my own company, I thought okay. Well, Imean I do endorsement deals for them and help them with social media,because that was my level of experience up until that point. That is what Ifocused on and I knew I was good at. I think it's important to get startedwith what you know, but also be open when clients come to you withadditional ideas or people. Ask if you have capabilities or just as yourjourney goes along to be open to adding more skillsets to your offering. So Inow only do maybe twenty five percent of what I thought I was going to do inseventy five percent has been adding different skill sets as the journey hasgone along. So, to give you an example, essentially when I started doing themarketing work for them and like I said it was really focused on social mediaand endorsement deals, I started to really get to know them and to careabout them and they became like family to me, an overtime they would come overfor Thanksgiving or I would help them renovate their house whatever it mightbe, and I I in our personal journeys together, I realize that basically, a lot of people help themget to the height of their career and a lot of people want to be around whilethey're in the spot lay but the minute it ends all of those people disappear,and now they're much later into life than most of us are when we figure outwhat it is that we want to do and there's no one around to support them,and that made me sick to my stomach, and I think I also realized that if youare Labron or your Patrick Myhomes, there's probably people coming to youwith offers for endorsement deals. But there's a lot of other great guys outthere who have amazing stories to tell and if no one is being proactive forthem, they're going to miss out on ways to maximize their career and make moneyand ultimately build a life after sports. So H, what what my purposebecame in my journey was helping them figure out life off the field and lifeafter sport. So a hundred percent of myanavel clients have second jobs, thena normal person would have in real life, and that became so much more importantin the core F of what I wanted to do, even though I started out as just doingtheir social media. An endorsement deals, that's so important, because Ithink a lot of sports fans say that they are fans of certainplayers, but they don't even think about the fact that you know a aprofessional athlete is in their prime, really young. So let's say like earlytwenties, I think- and you could probably speak o these numbers morethan I can, by the time most to the majority, not not all of the stars,especially not the stars. The majority of professional athletes are out oftheir prime meaning they might get cut or they're completely out of the legaltogether anyweek by thirty ish. Thirty, three thirty four around there. That's when normal people like us arelike really in the thick of our careers, so they need to have a not a bacco plan but a second careerfor when their first career ND, so you're, almost acting as like, as atherapist like trying to get to the the souls of these players to be like okayfootball's over hockey's over baseball's over. What do you want to dowith the rest of your life? Exactly, and I think the scenario you describedis really the best case in Arro, but there's there's plenty of players outthere who are on a number of teams for training, Camp or pre season, and mostpeople don't realize in the NALL. You don't get your big salary until you'reon the rost or weak one. So you could be on every single team during trainingcamp and only get paid a few hundred or a few thousand dollars, and never thereare people out there who have. Some are internships who are making more thansome of these ENAF l players so to even...

...make that initial roster is really hardto do so. There's a lot of players that have affiliations with teams either onthe practice quad or before the season starts, and they they never see theirnfl salary and really never made any substantial money in the first place,and and so for those guys, it's even worse y. If you have have a career andyou get to play a number of yeurs on a team. Obviously you have to figure outa second career but you're already better off than a lot of other athletesout there absolutely, and there are a number of I'm speaking to the NF L,because I know that's that's, who you primarily work with and ihaveexperience covering the N F L as well. But there are a lot of players who getsigned as underacted Fr agents, and so they don't get a signing bonus. A draftbonus like other players, get, and I think that some people, don't theydon't think about that. They just assume if you plain the enafellyou're,a millionaire and you're set for life, and that's not the case absolutely andwhat I say to the athletes I work with because you have the nail in the headis that you can't define yourself by something: that's temporary so fortheir whole lives they've only known themselves as a football player. That'sall anyone else is referred to them by so when that ends, who are they? And sowhat I really do is is help them figure out who they are authentically, whowhat it is that they e are really talented at what they're passionateabout and and to help them find opportunities, whether it's wellthey're playing or jobs after that are part of their soul, so that they'regoing to love what they're doing and it's not something. That's going toander be taken away from them, because, if you're doing what is authenticallyyou, then it can't disappear, and so I help them figure out that first, sothey're selecting opportunities and kind of the next pase that are reallygoing to be long, lasting and I always say to them when you are on a team.Really anyone will meet with you if, if you're on the practice squad, the thefourth string punter you're famous to the people around you so but the minuteyou retire, you become a movepoint, so you really have a short window tomaximize the ability to network and to figure out what you want to do off thefield and life after football and people want you for opportunitiesbecause you're a football player. So you have to really use your off timewisely because that's when the biggest percentage of opportunities are goingto come your way, so I tell them not to look at its por. SURFA ball,specifically in a situation is their purpose, but look at it as theirplatform to their purpose. Gosh, honestly wite. This is really importantwork and I feel like we need to use a different word other than social mediamarketing, because not that that's important but like that doesn't fullyencompass everything that you're doing for them. Have you thought about that? Well, I have one athlete Camera Lynchan and he calls me corporate mom and SASWHAT. I ultimately is great. Wall got really bad when hestarted calling my parents corporate GRANDM, an GRANDPA OO. When I we oungobut. I think ultimately, I kind of had to fess up to myself and say look. Istarted this as a social media company and then atgrew to marketing. Butultimately I helpd these athletes become the best versions of themselvesand really when you look at it, if you are in the field of marketing, you canread situations, you can read companies and you can help them grow. You canhelp them find niches. What you're doing is helping the company showl caseitself in the best way. So if, if I do that with companies, why can't I dothat with people and it's so much more impactaful, because you feel likeyou're, really changing and affecting lives, especially in a field where thepeople who are working with these athletes on a regular basis in general, don't seem to nearly careas much or the they're to get the paycheck and then they kind ofdisappear. So I realize in an alarming way that there was this white space andit was so important to the future of these athletes and no one was fillingit, and so I felt like that. I had no other choice. I know privacy is important, so don'tTese names, but can you share a success story? I'm just really curious abouthow you've been able to do this and and impact Lides in such a big way. Yeah.Thank you. Well, I feel, like that's, that's a lot of credit and I, when Isaid I wanted to fill my days with good things and good people. I've been luckyenough to find lifelong partners, and my clients are really the best peopleand they support me as much as I support them, so they really deserve alot of credit but ill. Give you an example. So one of my first clients isa guy named Brandon Copeland, and I met him when I was in a previous job Ho sawsome of work. I was doing for another client and he sent me a message onAnstcram I'd, never heard of them, but he had a Detroit Lions Jersey in thispicture. So I thought well, this must be someone who plays football and heasked if we could hop on the phone and we started talking and he he startedtelling me that he only lives on fifteen percent of his salary, and Icould tell he was a really good guy. He had all the attributes of someone whowas going to be newly successfuon was...

...really special, but no one had heard ofthem. Yet so, essentially you I had decided those were the type of people Iwanted to surround myself with and and partner with, because I just knew theyhad everything inside that mattered and it made a great partner and he said tome on that call. Are you sure you want to take me on I'm a nobody? Well,basically, we started doing a few things for free, a few interviews andwithin a year he's been on every major. He was on every major news outlet atSPN New York Times C NBC he's on their investment council. Now he's becom afinancial literacy professor at Penn in the off season, he's now entering hiseth season in the NFL, and I will say when we first had that discussion, hehad been cut a number of times or had injuries. He was, he would tell youprobably he was still a little bit finding his way and within about a yearof us working together, he had a number of offers off the field and it was hischoice and he he just signed with the New England Patriots for this year. Sonot only has it helped his football career, but he has become the financialliteracy Gugro in the NFL, and I think one moment that really struck me likewe made it is the week of the NFL draft last year. He was on the home page ofthe SPN, and this is a guy who was undrafted, but he has just done so muchto build his brand and to become the face of financial literacy and the NFLthat he overtook all the other stories that were happening draft week. That isso cool and he is smart for doing this. While he's playing, because I feel likethere are some players that wait until they're not playing to be like. Oh,okay. Well, guess I better figure out what I'm doing now and he you know,took the Initiai to reach out to you and put the time in where now, if, ifhe happens, to get cut, he's not scrambling to find something he's notfreaking out, he's he's got it coveared. So that's amazing that you two havebeen able to work together in a successful way. Absolutely- and I thinkone other small moment I had that- I just felt like okay. This is exactlywhat I'm supposed to be doing. Is I had another client who originally hadwanted to play longer in the NFL he played for four years, but because ofthe work that we had done and we had built so much of his life off the field.He decided to retire because he was more excited about this next chapterthan he was about continuing to play and put his body in harms away, and Ithought well. This is how I know that I've done my job because he's moreexcited about off the field opportunities than he is about planewow. You really are a corporate mom, because the way you talk about them,too, is like you're, proud of your children, and it's it's really great.That's all yeah I feel like I have Ali, have five different kids, who all needdifferent things, have different personalities all at the same time, soI really do feel feel like a mom. It's it's interesting. Even yesterday I wastalking to one of Hem and he was putting together marketing presentationof his own and he was asking some questions about general terminology andthings that are so second nature to me, and I just realize that no one sitsdown and talkd talks, these guys about the simple things that are common senseto the rest of us in the business world. Even even how to write a resume. I meanthat's not something that they learn. So it's kind of made me smile becauseobviously they're beasts on the field, but some of the times when they come tome, I do feel like I'm raising a child, so you've received multiple, impressiveaccolades for your work. You were a forty under forty nominee. Two YearsStraight, you were a twenty nineteen business woman of the yearnomine andI'm sure there are others that you can tell me about too. But I say all ofthis to ask: What does success mean to you it's funny, because s when you have nominations or or youget awards initially, you're really excited and you get tied into those and,of course they're great. But you realize too that when they don't workout D and when you don't win them, you have to ask yourself: Are you stilldoing everything you set out to do when you realize again they're nice to have,but they don't really mean as much as may be a thought they would and for me,I successs is, like I said, filling my days with good things and good peopleand being able to have the freedom to spend every day. However, I would likeso luckily again I work with clients and I say to them: Hey when I'm havingtime with friends and family, because for me I finally found a role where mypriorities can ladder back to my schedule. So my family and friends arethe most important people in my life and I will drop everything for them.They matter most, and I think I was frustrated in other roles, that I hadto pick and choose what events I attended being able to be there forpeople, and I always say you know: People talk about work, life balanceand I say to me that is really addressing what is ever whatever ismost pressing at the moment, and I am...

...able to do that in this rule and to methat success, because that way, every minute, I'm spending my time exactlyhow I want to be sometimes that o work at off hours and sometimes a Tuesday attwo o'clock, I'm going to lunch with my dad and I those memories are soprecious and I'm never going to get that time back and so being able to bein a dynamic where I can spend my days exactly how I want that is success in adream. Come true to me. What is your vision for yourself professionallyheading into the future? I feel, like that's a very loaded question, becauseyou started your own business and you've adapted to so many different things that havecome your way and you sort of moulded yourself into something that maybe youdidn't even know you would become when you first started, but do you have aspecific vision for yourself in that way? Yeah! It's a really good question.I mean I e found what I love doing in that I really love working with thesports world and helping the athletes and in companies within the sportsworld become the best versions of themselves and sometimes that's withmarketing, and sometimes that's with teaching and methods and a lot of thestuff I talked about in the book. So I would say that's the more concreteanswer, but I could never have imagined that I would be where I am at thispoint, and so I kind of always say that job opportunities are a lot likespouses. It's really hard to predict them. You just have to know yourselfwell enough to know it's right for you when you see it, so I think you knowfor people you should never settle. You should never be unhappy on a regularbasis in a roll. If you feel that way, there's something better out there foryou and, of course it requires some patience, but you have to know exactlywho you are and what you want for yourself again, you are the first useof what is that person want the most, and so when opportunities come about,you know that OK, this is it. This is what I've been waiting for, and this iswhat I meant to do. Even if I couldn't have predicted this would come aboutand it all comes full circle. I love how you brought it back to the buck.That's amazing! Before I let you go inny. Can you leave us with a woman insports who inspires you wow there? There are so many of them M. I I when Iwas at e SPN. I helped launch o series called power players which featuredwomen who worked on the business side of sports, and that was really cool forme because I didn't know those roles had existed. No one shows you on T vthe Front Office and that there are women inside who have jobs in sports. Ijust you only see the broadcasters and one of the women that I interviewed wasAmy Trask, who was the first female cl of an NFL team, and not only did shetotally break the glass yealing, but she's never stopped being kind. If youfollow her ontowitter, she responds to everyone. I just sent her a copy of mybook to be able to show her that she's in it, and I think what I admire mostis when a woman in sports is a really good person and it's great what they'veaccomplished, but that they lead with kindness in their heart, so she' she'san example who really stands out to me. That's awesome. I do follow amy. I doalso look up to amy and I will try to get her on the show and I illlove howyou spoke about kindness, because a lot of gas that I've had on this show talkabout being able to pay it forward, because most of us are inappointen ourcareers, where we're able to give back and give other people advice and andjust share our story, which is exactly why I wanted to have you on, and soit's really important for not only these incredible women that we look upto, but also to take time ourselves to give back. So I do want to thank youfor being on this show and sharing your story and I'm so excited for your newbook. I'm going to go order it and I just want to think you for doingawesome work, because the work you're doing, even though, if you met someoneout- and you said- Oh, I work in social media marketing on the surface. Itdoesn't sound, maybe that meaningful or that important, because you know it'ssocial media, but what you're doing is so much more than that, and I'm soexcited to share this for people to understand that well. Thank you. Ireally appreciate that, and I think what I realize in my own journey isthat what I love the most is not just using the tools that I've learned inlife to help with marketing, but I love using the lessons. I learn to helpPeople Anto to speak at schools and to teach people, and I just realized theimpact t I can have of making someone who was in who's in my place that I wasin years ago right now, it makes them feel not alone and that's kind of mypurpose and I think, still to this day, I'm really in uncharted territory. Interms of what I do, and so even having conversations like you with you, youknow is so inspiring to me and and meeting other amazing women like youwho are so confident and authentic and who were willing to take the risk to tostart their own businesses and their...

...own ventures as well. Is So reassuringto me, because you don't feel so alone and there's not a lot of people thatyou can look to to lean on or to feel validated by R or to partner with. Andso you know you are one of those people who is so inspiring to me, because youmake me feel like I made the right choices in my own journey, especiallybeing another Oman yourself who who took the leap of faith and was braveenough to go out on her own nou or someone who constantly inspires me andis a reminder for me that you K ow. It is OK to do that and it can lead toultimate success. Wellwell. Thank you for saying that Iappreciate it. I think the common theme is that no one really knows whatthey're doing. I 't think everyone just kind of goes for it and and hopes forthe vest, and I think, as long as as exactly what you've been saying thiswhole time as long as you stag youre to yourself you're genuine, and you reallyjust go after. What's on your heart, then you can't go wrong. SIC, O! Thankyou for sharing wit me. I really appreciate you, oh my gosh. I feel thesame same way about you sending lots of ehogs and intil. We can do it in personand I think I would just say to people from both of our stories that noexperience is a waste and your God is paying at you. You should go for it dand hopefully this conversation well inspire some people, especially duringthis time, maybe been thinking about you know, taking that legal faith andin this Pivit or this transition period we're having we give them theopportunity to do so. We can find inspiration from so manydifferent people in so many different industries, but I think what's soinspiring about Whitney' story is that she really is no different than you andme other than the fact that she chose to jump. She chose to follow her heart.She chose to be herself to see where it would lead her and she had no idea thekind of success she would find. I'm so happy that her decision to jump haslanded her, so many victories personally and professionally. If youwant to learn more about Whitney, you can follow her oninstigram at WhitneyHolmsman and you can buy her book on an Lasan just search for you are the firstyou if you want to follow along with this show, you can find an ontutter, aninstogram aand, so she goes pod and and so she goes pod dotcom thanks forlistening.

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