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And So She Goes
And So She Goes

Episode 13 · 1 year ago

12. Rashida Gayle, Sports Marketing Agent & Founder, TwentySix Marketing Agency

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Last year, Rashida made history as the first African American woman to independently represent MLS and NFL athletes, at just 27 years old. How incredible is that? She has built relationships with many big name clients throughout the years like NFL Running Back Devonta Freeman, San Francisco 49ers Wide Receiver Deebo Samuel, Patriots Wide Receiver N'Keal Harry, and a few MLS players. Although it hasn't been easy, her work ethic and determination to succeed has propelled her at a time when the world around her is uncertain. In this episode, we dive into the importance of genuine relationship building, pivoting when necessary, and knowing your value. We also discuss the need for more diversity in sports marketing.

Conversations with real women who makesports happen, this is, and so she goes, here's your host, Amanda Borgeous, Hello. Thank you for tuning in fromwherever you are. I have had so much fun talking to some pretty bad asswomen lately, and let me tell you this episode is no different, just areminder, if you are enjoying these chats, which of course I hope you are-you can sign up to get on my emailist every Thursday morning, they'll pop upin your inbox and there's a nice little article, summarizing the episode and,of course, a link to listen. So if you're interested go to end, so shegoes pod DOT com. You can subscribe through the Popa Foor on the home page.So today my guest is Rushita Gale. She is a sports marketing agent and founderof Twenty Six marketing agency. Now, in case you don't know what a sportsmarketing agent does. Basically, her job is to help grow her clients brand,so she helps them thrive off the field or off the court. She organizesendorsement deals and appearances and really just allows them to find theirvoice to best promote themselves. Her client list passed and present includesNFL running back to Vonte, Friman, Nikil, Harry White Receiver for thePatriots, some other players from the Falcons and the Ravens in the MLS team,Atlanta, United Pirchina, and I both went to Florida, state and she's workedin sports marketing since then, now recently, when the agency she wasworking for experienced to hardship because of Covet nineteen, she saw that the perfect opportunity to go out onher own. So we talk about what it takes to start your own company during apandemic and how to navigate the ever changing landscape of the digital andsocial media space. Last year, Rachina made history as the first AfricanAmerican woman to independently represent MLS n NFL athletes at twentyseven years old. How incredible is that in our chat? We also talk about how herclients are feeling during all of this, her advice for those who want to breakinto sports marketing, and we also discuss the need for more diversity inthe space overall in terms of race, gender and age. Now, as if having onecompany wasn't enough, Rushita is also the cofounder of a non profit. Women'sorganization called Bloom. She talks about the purpose of that and, ofcourse, how you can join here is my conversation with sports marketingagent, Foshita Gale, hello, Rashita. How are you hey, Amanda?I'm doing well think you so much for having me. Oh my gosh, thank you for being here,I'm so excited. I love having fellow seminals on the show and Youare thefirst one go knows all Daygonos, it's...

...exciting Um. How have you been lately?Everyone's, you know, getting used to quarantine by now and hunkering down athome is is everything okay for you, everything's been gone well, a'm, theless that my family is safe and healthy. You know I work from home, so it's notmuch of a difference. The bigger difference for me is I'm unable totravel. So working in sports or just marketing in general, you're always onthe road you gat different hotels, you're on so many different flights,and so that part sucks, because obviously we can't travel right now,but everything else is pretty good and I'm just thankful that I'm healthy andmy family's healthy, that's good. That's really good and you've beenpretty busy because you started a company during a pandemic. Let's goback to the beginning. How did that idea come about? Yes, I started a company during thePandemac who would have thought. Basically, I think you know once the MBa league decided to suspend their season. You saw a domino effect acrosstha country, especially economically within weeks. It was evident that theworld we knew was transforming before our eyes and so pivoting from me wasabsolutelynecessary in order to be successful and to ultimately survive, which I think, as will get into thePodcastis, that resulte independent representation, but essentially myformer company was severely impacted by the pandemic and they unfortunatelyeliminated their entire talent marketing division. So I saw this as anopportunity to execute a dream of mine, which was to create an innovative, ayoung, a modern agency, and that's how twenty six marketing agency came about.Our main focus is to maximize our client's brand exposure, but we alsowant to make sure that we're creating cultural and meaningful brandcollaborations. I just want to talk about your mind fora minute, because it's one thing to have this idea, I feel, like everyone,has a dream of some sort, or they have big goals for themselves, but once apin, demicates, like none of us, have dealt with anything like this before.So how did you get your mind right to be like okay? This is what I want to do.It doesn't matter that we're in crisis, I'm just going to turn this into mydream, I'm just going to make the best of this situation. How did you do that? So that's a great question and I thinkit's a personality you have to have in sports. You gain a pretty tosscanner,you have a Tuscan and you learn how to deal with situations that are not idealand so from me, coming into sports, one of my bigger focuses was levridge. Howdo I make sure that, no matter what I'm always representing my clients- andthat was a priority of mine, and so...

...when this happened, I knew that I stillhad my client relationships. I knew that literally, it was just a namechange for me, but I also knew that there was an opportunity for me tocreate something big, something great and provide opportunities for youngerprofessionals as well. So my motivation, I would say, keeps me Goin and keeps mein a headspace where it's always tryng to survive as an agent as literally thejob description. How are you going to survive? How are you going to make itin this competitive dog, eatall industry, so that mindset and that strategy comeswith the nature of the business and obviously Plata role in my decision tostart twenty six marketing? So let's talk about your work for thosewho don't exactly know what a sports marketing agent does. What is it thatyou do for your clients, so we're responsible for quite a fewdifferent M services? Whore we offer quite a few different services, sospecifically twenty six marketing, we're a full service marketing agencyand we offer a Pathora of services. Those may include marketing andnegotiations content creation, which is huge right now, endorsements andappearances brand building, digital and social media strategy, clients,services, thereis, so much that we offer but essentially providing ourclients with opportunities to monitize their brand off the Qort or off thefield in addition to building meaningfulcollaborations. So what is your strategy like? How doyou get players to trust you and by into your expertise and what you canprovide for them because theree there are so many others out there that theycan go with, but they've they've chosen, you yeah. So you know that goes back torecruiting, which is extremely difficult. By far the toughest thingI've ever done and I'm still faaling at it more than I'm succeeding at ItourIndustry's supercompetitive- and you know everyone wants to represent thebigger stars. I think standing above the crowd is essential to acquire highcalibere talent, and you really need to acquire high caliber Tylan in order tohave something to market right. So this is essentially why I created twenty six.I think our talent pool of of just athletes or even influenceseastports Etcetra, it's getting younger and younger day by day and the digitalspace is thriving. So for me, it's imperative to offer services thatmerror the modern marketing space that we live in and e, even though I'm offering all ofthese amazing services- and I have a great book of business- It's stillnever guaranteed that you 're going to sign a player because you're so good atwhat you do or your agency the biggest...

...agency et. CETA luck has a lot to dowith it, and decisions are being made that have nothing to do with you. Sothat's what makes it really difficult, but I think staying the course andbeing consistent. andpersistent is key to being successful in the recruitingspace and, ultimately, bringing talent on that will trust you to do a good job yeah. I feel like building solid relationships andgenuine relationships like can make or break your business specificallybecause your clients need to trust that you are going to help them reach acertain goal, show off their brand a certain way. So I I feel like without being in an authentic client um relationshipthat none of that really works right. Yeah. Absolutely I would savrelationships is probably the most important thing in our industry. If youdon't have relationships, you have nothing and someone can be successful,just base off who they know, and it has nothing to do with their degree. It hasnothing to do with how smart they are, what they bring to the table it couldjust be. I know this person and they're giving me a shot, and I do well at withthis opportunity. So you know just going just reiterating what yesaidrelationships is so important in our industry and it's literally your way tosurvive. I want to ask how you got into this inthe first place, so we both went to Florida state, like I mentioned earliergonels. What was your first job out of college? So, let's go back to college, reallyquick. When I attended Florida State University, my sophomore year, I got ajob to be the administrative assistant and our sports marketing office. I'dalways love sports, so I thought like okay, when I was in high school, I wasthe football manager so pretty much. It's a pretty name for the water girlright and I wal Bet every game every combine every practice like I live andbreethe a south Florida football. Then I came to school. You know, went tocollege and realized that I, in order to be a warter girl, like you, have toit's not the same thing as it was in high school okay. So how can I continueworking in sports, but I don't need to be majoring and sports medicine inorder to be a part of the sports culture. So I was fortunate enough to get thatposition in the Sports Marketing Department, and I did that for threeyears. In addition to that, I also interned with the with the DA thedepartment as well, and so I, on game days would be executing activations. Iwas at Bolleyball, Dames Tennis Games, Softball Games, baseball games etCETERA and was really hands on with the Sports Marketing Department. So that iswhat gave me my start in working in...

...sports, and once I graduated fromschool, I was trying to find a job couldn't find a job was getting a bunchof internships that mirrored the same internship I was doing in school, andso I just decided to create my own agency with the relationships that Ihad right. We go back to a relationship H. I didhave those relationships withsome of the star athletes that attended our university. I would I would not bein the position I am today and even though I did not know they would turnout to be what it is now. I knew that building relationships was key in orderto get your foot in a door in sports, so that was really my first job. I alsohad a side job at Fedex. I loved that job. That was great, but I spent hours at the AthleticDepartment in the Sports Marketing Office and on game days, and so gettingthat experience really helpd me establish my agency coming out ofcollege. I love that I feel like it's. It's actually really great life adviceto go back to basics, for especially for people that don't know specificallywhat they want to do. So obviously you knew what you wanted to do, which isgreat, but not everyone does, and if you just like kind of strip back andand look at yourself and be like okay, what am I goo out? What do I enjoy? Ilike connecting with people, I'm good at it? I want to be able to dosomething that allows me to connect network, help, people and buildrelationships, and that could be so many different things and I thinksometimes people get so caught up in like I want to be a sports broadcaster,I want to be a sports agent. I want to be like, like super specific roles, butsometimes like our path is almost decided for us. If we just focus on thebasics of what we are good at and what we enjoy doing, I cannot agree with you b t more. I youknow, I wanta talk about a story, actually a situation that happened tome. I was so pressed to work in the football department like I was like. Ineed to get the football internship and, although I was working in sportsmarketing, I just feult. Like I mean marketing is cool, but like football iswhere it's at like H, I put it on a pedestal and I think I applied for theinternship three times and I never got the internship and I was devastated andI said to myself: okay, after the emotion's clear, I'm like what am Igoing to do, you know how am I going to work in sports? Meanwhile, I have A. Ihave a job in sports as we're speaking, but I'm just like not super happy aboutit. I Wan t work in football and I decide to just put my focus in theopportunity that I had as if you know what I have this sports marketingopportunity. They allow me to be hands on in whatever way, I feel asbeneficial to me. Why don't I just be thankful for this opportunity and takeadvantage of it and put my all into it. So at the moment you know ID struggledwith accepting the fact that I couldn't...

...get the slopal internship, but it endedup working now, like I couldn't have asked for my path to have been betterdirected sports marketing absolutely gave me the foundation that I needed inorder to start a marketing agency. So sometimes we may feel like. I want todo this thing specifically, but you have other opportunities around you inyour blind you're blind to them, because you're so focused on one thingand that's the thing about sports. You have to open up your mind and bewilling to try different things, because you never know how thatposition or that experience could help you in the future. Absolutely very well said, and youcould limit yourself like if you are set out to accomplish one specificthing then, and you don't have an open mind, then you know you might not evensee like you said, you'd be blinded to other opportunities and I truallybelieve everything happens for a reason. So if, if one thing doesn't happen,that's because something else is supposed to Um. I love that you you've had an open mind but, like fromthe beginning, it sounds like you've been focussed on making the best ofevery opportunity and just putting your head down and working ashard as possible to get the job done. Last year you made a history as thefirst African American woman to independently represent MLS and NFLathletes at twenty seven years old. That's pretty incredible when you hearthat what does that mean to you well, thank you. It's very muchappreciated I. It was a huge honor and it's cool, but I don't want it tostop there. I really for me it's reallyimportant to continue providing opportunities for younger professionals,so that bear ears continue to be broken and it becomes normal to have a diverseroom in sports. I think that is something that not happening as quicklyas we all would want it to, and so it's really cool to get the honor of beingthe first African American orjist, like maybe minority women, I would say torepresent independently emelescent nd f players, but I would like for there to be a diaverse representation across the Board in Sports, and I justhope that I can provide opportunities for younger people and make peopleaware that there needs to be some focus on diversity yeah. So what does thatlook like right now in terms of being a sports agent, when you look around theindustry, how many women are in similar positions, not a lot man? I can count on my handshow many women are successful in our field. It's just O male dominated space.It's really tough to break in, and it's just the Big Voyce Club, you knowand you're a woman trying to get in. So I've always been around men, my entirelife. I know how to handle those...

...situations and so from me it's prettyeasy, but it's still unfortunate not to be able to see more diversity, not onlygender, wise, but race, wise, even age, wise as wow Um. You know, I think that th it needs to change and usually whenI'm in a room, it's mostly Cautasian men, so that definitely can be disappointing attimes, but I'm hoping that I can be a example of a hard working individualwho can't contribute to the space. I love that a and you are you're anamazing example Y. ' e you're paving the way Um, there's a quote that I'veheard that I cling to all the time. It's if you can't see it, then youcan't be it, and so I'm sure you've thought about this, but there might beyounger girls who look up to you and they're like if she can do it. I can doit if she can start her own company and represent all these athletes, then Ican do it so you're doing really amazing work and truly your clientsthat you do have can see the advantage of having a woman represent thembecause not to Tut our own horns, but as women like we have stuff to offerthat men can't offer. Absolutely, I think, knowing your differences and holding inon that is key, don't don't feet up yourself, oh because I'm a black personor I'm a woman or I'm too young, don't let any of that define the hard workthat you're going to put in and use your differences to your advantage. I'MA big! That's like my biggest thing. How what makes me different fromeveryone else in this room? Okay, Great! How can I use this to my advantage? Ithink if people approach situations like that, they would see the beautyand their differences and not cretique themselves, because they're differentyeah. Definitely where does your sense of self confidence? Come from? That's a great question. I think how Iwas raised really played a part in that. My mother was a phenomenal woman. Shewas an executive at a construction firm and she just was always someone Ilooked up to and she just had. She had three children and she was doing it alland I still don't know how she did it all. I have no kid and I'm still tryingto figure it out. Okay, so ononce become an adult you're like wait.How do people do this? Nobody want me to do this, but how are you guys likemaking it? You know? I think it's it's so interesting Um. So I had someone tolook up to, especially as a woman. My father was really involved in our livesas well and really pushed us to be great. So I think my foundation, myfamily, provided a really good...

...foundation and it's honestly aprivilege right. So many people don't get the opportunity to have such astrong foundation, so I'm absolutely lucky I'm blessed. I have had thefamily that I had and deraised the way I was raised and that really instilldsome strong confidence in myself. I agree, that's huge, that's very, veryhuge. So you start a company in the middle of a pendimic or at thebeginning, it's a weird time. No one knows how tonavigate this. No one knows when it's going to end Um, you know, aside fromhealth and safety, concerns everyone's worried about job security and and justtrying to make things work. What has this time been like for you and yourbusiness? I mean sports they're not being played, so I imagine you've hadto sort of get creative to keep your clients doing what they do off thefield and and still helping to promote them. Yeah, absolutely we're living in a newnormal. My clientse are pre, pretty much leaning into social media tocreate authentic dialogue with followers and pretty much like curve.The potential tone deathness right in providing wholesome entertainment, Ithink, is key, being authentic, engaging with your followers andletting them know that you're aware of what's going on you're sympathetic toit, and you have a good understanding ofwhat people are going through, but you can still provide wholesomeentertainment, its key. I think that you know just paving theway for athletes to hit the marketing ground running when the wheels begin toturn is going to be he so amplifying their social media platform, so thatbrands think of them their top of mind when opportunities do come about, butright now it isn't the time to cash in so much unpaid opportunities, but tobuild with our fellow humans, our society and just people who are goingthrough a really tough time. You know, I think unemployment the numbers werereleased today was thirty, eight point, six, almost forty million inunemployment, so having an understanding that you can't just bepitching companies, hey pay my athlete this or this iswhimy athlete should bepaid that it's not the time to do that. In my opinion, it's very insensitive,and so we want our plients to focus on building their brand and their socialledia and their digital platforms, so that when that opportunity does comeabout where they can cash inon opportunities, they are a top of mind. Yeah I've had conversations with otherbrand marketers, specifically in sports and they're. Like you know, we're justfocused on being a good community member right now, because you know we,we want people to know that we are human and we're all feeling the samefeelings and, like you said it's not as important to pitch or cell, but tomostly just connect an and be human to that end. What are your clients saying?How? How are they feeling about all...

...this I mean I'm sure, we've we'vetalked so much about relationship building, I'm sure you have greatrelationships with your players and you're talking to them constantly bynow they've settled in 'cause. It's been like this for some time, but how are they feeling that's a great question and not onethat you know anyone usually acts like hore the athletes doing they're Goodou.I think they find it just as unusual. Most of our clients that we representare either in season or supposed to start tas or their osseason training,and so I think the teams are still trying to figure out how they're goingto make that happen, and what a shortened season looks like there're,so much in the works and so much unknown, and so are athletes, althoughI think they're taking it well, are still trying to figure out what itmeans for them. You know what it means for their career and how they can't beeffective during this time. So, just like for US sports marketers, it'sdifficult so maneuvre this base, I would say, I'svery similar for our athletes, they're just trying to keep their head abovewater. I think they're financially secure, but just in terms of time,there's a lot of free time in theyre unable to go to their facilities andtrain and just hang out with their teamates.So it's definitely interesting for them, but I think they're taking it. Well, that's good to hear 'cause! I I knowthat there are a lot of unknown Um, whether it's someone that works on youor side of sports or, if you're, the actual athlete Um. What do you think the future of sportswill look like? What do you think will change the most after this? I know it'skind of a loaded question, but I mean I guess, even in terms of just like howwe're branding ourselves and and how sports are being promoted, I feel, like things will change once this is over yeah. I think postpandemic right 'cause,that's about to be a thing. Yeah it'll be really interesting to see how helegs and teams adjust to this new climate. I think it's something none ofus hav experience before and we're all brainstorming and trying to figure outways to provide solutions to what is now like the new normal, I think for awhile people will not want to be in crowded SFACES, which would beinteresting to see how teams and Leag Responso not having fool stadiums, butI also think that the digital landscape will see a massive growth in usage andentertainment and engagement. I think everyone is transitioning digitally andI think that is absolutely going to play a role in our new normal, butessentially I'm guessing like everyone else, but as I have no idea f what that'sgoing to look like, but I know for sure that things will be different yeah. Imean you've seen a couple of different...

...teams, role out ideas for you know iffans are allowed back in the stands when Games return, you know like howthey'll enter an exit and there's just there's, there's so much, and it's likeyou said no one. No one knows, and I think that's the hardest part Um forpeople that have to plan ahead it it's almost impossible to do so. Let'spretend for a second or not in the middle of a pandemic. Things are normal.If a young person came up to you and asked for advice on how to become agreat sports agent or how to break into the business, what advice would yougive to them? So everyone wants to be a sports agent,let's Tart there. You know I di too. I wanted to be ierfor an agant as well,and I'm a sports marketing agent, but that's different from a contract sportsagent, but I think what young people have to have a understanding of isvalue right. What valley do you bring to the table? What sets you apart? Whatmakes you different and like what really makes you different? Not Oh, I'mgoing to help players not go bro different. I think it's a line. That's always usedlike hey, I'm going to change the industry by helping players to keeptheir money. Well, I don't think that's enough of a value to bring to makeyourself different, so I think that you know bringing valueto the table and having a personality that can accept more nose than yesisiswe would be successful in sports. If you hear a hundred knows that is commonright, you're not going to always hear yes, and so how quickly do you give upis going to be a question that I think young people need to ask themselves.It's a really really hard industry. It's a really tough industry and mostpeople will not make it. You know that is the reality of it, but as long asyou know that Iam all for you giving it a shot like as long as you understandthat I need to be valuble- and this is super difficult and super hard, but Ican do it. Why not? You should absolutely go for it, but just know that it comeswith a lot of heartbrakes, I would say and disappointments, but if you areconsistent with it and you work smart and not just work hard but work, smartyou'll see some success in sports and also be open minded and don't limitYourseuf be open to working in the ticket office, be open to working inthe PR office. Whatever you think will give you invaluable experience to bringmore bow to the table, I think, is important yeah absolutely. I have experience onthe broadcasting side and it's very subjective, and it can get you downreal quick. If you get enough nose...

...to really um get bummed out and and value others opinions more than youknow, you're worth M, it's it's very tough and the good thing is, as wementione before is for people that want to work in sports tere. So manydifferent ways you can go. So if you are set on becoming a regular sports agent or working insports marketing and being an agent and that seunds, like you um I for some reason that doesn't work out.I mean there are so many other avenues, but I think another aspect of your job is having toadapt. I mean in this digital age. Things change all the time like socialmedia platforms are popping up like every other day, and you have to likefigure out how to navigate those and and work them correctly and find theright voice for your Brai like there's, no right or wrong way to do it. Youjust gotta, like think on your toes and and figure out how to make it work. Absolutely I totally agree pivoting youhave to pivot so much in sports. It's insane so getting comfortable in doingthat is important, because I think it allows you to understand that nothing is wont to say the same, andthings are constantly changing for reasons that we don't know and when youcan stay ahead of the carve and ahead of the game. It'll keep you in sportsfor a long time and it'll really help you stand down and hopefully make adifference in the sports industry. So when new platforms come out, thisjust remind te me because I know that Tekh Tak is a huge thing and I refuseto fill myself dancing an boast on the Internet. But when platforms like thatcome out and you have ideas and you're pitching them to clients, have you hadexperiences where your clients like? No I'm not doing that? Yeah absolutely. But you know that'sone reason why we only recruit specific Talente, because our talent needs tounderstand that the world is changing constantly and so keeping up with thetime is impor Ann and I think, as you get older, you're Likeno, I don't wantto download tiktok. But that's why I love working with younger professionals,because I think they are excited and passionate about all the new changes inthe different ways that you know this generation or or younger generationsare influencing the space, and so they get to teach you actually what's new,what's popping Wha's cultural and so giving our athletes the ability to honein on those opportunities and just get some insight and knowledge. We hopethat they take that information and they're able to utilize those platformsand do well on them, but we absolutely get guys who are like? No, I'm God, I'mnot thinig, that e Ta o Video D, it's okay for them to say that, but theydefinitely end up missing out if they...

...don't hop on earlier, and then theyjust are a part of o, because everyone has to talk. I want to have it too.There drea needs to be some authenticity and honing and on yourbrand and what oes that ma? That means trying new things out. That means beingcomfortable in front of the camera, no matter what platform Youare on yeah, absolutely and there's nothinglike younger people. Talking about platforms to make you feel old, likeI'm almost thirty, and when ta first came out, I'm like Oh, I feel like,like my mom 's, like what is this nonsense like what's going on, so itisn't Bor to Lear Wa lovy before I let you go. You have cofounded another company aswell, it's called Bloom and I would love for you to share about that yeah. Absolutely thanks for bringingthat so bloom is actually a non profit organization. Women's Organization, atthat I started it with a good friend of mine, Jasmine Johnson, who is counciland an entertainment company. We hang out a lot in Atlanta and we justrealize like Wai there's so many dove women that we're hanging out with likethese hangout sessions need to be meaningful. So we started bloom whichstrives the promote wellness on personal developmen and service amongprofessional women. We really want to encourage women to embrace their powerand their purpose and their value by living just lives that they love whilemaking positive contributions outto the world, and we really believe thatcollectively by drawing on the wisdom and creativity and network andresources of all the women that we know, we can all dloom together. So that'swhy we started, and we've done really well, we're really excited to continueholding in on our purposse and our passion and building a network ofstrong, innovative young professional woman wow. I love that so much seriously.That's that's so amazing that something like that can come about just from youhanging with your friend afd being like. We need to make this a thing. Peopleneed to join US ND and come together. How can we learn more about that and bea part of it yea? Absolutely I saw on my Instigram, which is just Foshita Galin my bio. I do have our at women that Bloom Tag. That brings you to our BloomOrganization instragrampage, so you can either visit my page or at woman thatbloom and in our bio we usually have our membership link right there. But if we don't, becausewe're hosting an event or something you can just send us a DM and we'll sendover that membership linke to you, so you can fill it out and we'll be intouch. I love that that's so cool! Okay!RICHITTA! Can you leave us with a woman...

...who inspires you? Maybe someone thatyou look up to or even someone you work with that I could potentially have onthe show on this show: Wow, okay 'cause. Whenyou first asked mem the question, I'm like Oh yeah, Micha, a Bama da Ma. I can retir the tar rig she a litte harder to get, but yeahtotally still little ourse show, I would say, Nicol Lynne. I thinkshe's done amazing things and the the sports space. She was one of thefirst B women or, if not the first black woman, to represent a top fivepik. She represented clinning Williams last year in the dram in this year. Sherepresented another first Bron pig and she also represented the quarterbaks we played for OklahomaJalynhertz. I believe I think she would be really cool to have on the show andcan get some good insight on what is like to be a contract agent, very cool yeah. I I follow. I followher and Um. Everything that she's doing is is really awesome, so GISETTA. Thankyou so much for sharing. This has been of pleasure. I really appreciate yourtime. Good luck with the rest of the pandemic and also everything thatyou'll be accomplishing postpandemic lots of good stuff in there stayingopenminded. Even if you think you know what you want. Let me tell you that isnot easy to do. Also her mindset of staying resilient and having theability to pivot in crysis is really admirable. It's hard work and shereally is killing it. Also. I like how canda she was about how hard it is towork in sports ND. In order to succeed in this industry, you need to establishyourself and know your value and as Cheseas it sounds. I think that appliesto many parts of life. Anyway, I hope you enjoyed my chat with Rashita. Ifyou want to follow along with her journey, she is at Rashita gale onsocial media, and if you want to follow me and the show you can find me at, andso she goes pod also if you would be so kind, please rate and review the showfor me, I do all of this for free, so your review is more helpful than youthink, and it allows me to see what you are enjoying most. I do read all of myreviews, so who knows maybe I'll give you a shout out on the next episodethanks for Listening.

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